Computer processor speed comparisons: PassMark — CPU Comparison

How to Compare Different CPUs the Right Way

The Central Processing Unit (CPU), also known as a processor, is the brain of the computer and is thus its most important component. Unfortunately, comparing two different processors side-by-side can be tough, which can complicate any purchases you might make.

Thankfully, there are many sites out there that make CPU comparisons easier. In this article, we’ll tell you exactly what matters the most and what doesn’t when comparing different processors and how to compare processors the right way.

Clock Speed Isn’t Everything

Clock speed and cores are the most heavily advertised aspects of processors. Clock speed is usually noted in hertz (e.g., 3.14GHz), while the number of cores is usually advertised as dual-core, quad-core, hexa-core, or octa-core.

Are you curious about what makes a CPU better than another and how to compare CPUs accurately?

For a long time, it was this simple: the higher the clock speed, the faster the processor, and more cores meant better speeds. But processor technology today isn’t dependent as much on clock speeds and cores because CPUs now have several other parts that determine how fast they can perform.

In a nutshell, it comes down to how much computing can be done when all parts of a CPU come together in a single clock cycle. If performing Task X takes two clock cycles on CPU A and one clock cycle on CPU B, then CPU B might be the better processor even if CPU A has a higher clock speed.

Overall, you can’t just rely on clock speed or cores, which are the two most heavily advertised aspects of processors.

You should compare clock speeds only when you are trying to decide between two CPUs from the same family and the same number of cores. What this means is that if you’re looking at two quad-core Intel Core i5 Skylake processors, then the one with the higher clock speed will be faster.

For any other scenario, the clock speed or cores don’t always indicate performance. If you’re comparing Intel Core i3 vs. Core i5 vs. Core i7 processors or Intel Core i5 vs. Core i7 vs. Core i9 processors, then clock speed and number of cores don’t matter. And if you’re comparing Intel vs. AMD or an AMD A10 vs. AMD A8 vs. AMD FX, then clock speed alone won’t tell you much.

Check Single-Threaded Performance

The dirty little secret in the computer world is that even though you’re buying a processor with four cores, all four of those cores might not be used when you’re running applications.

Most software today is still single-threaded, which means the program is running as one process, and a process can only run on one core. So even if you have four cores, you won’t be getting the full performance of all four cores for that application.

That’s why you also need to check the single-threaded (or single-core) performance of any processor before buying it. Not all companies explicitly release that information, so you’ll need to rely on third-party data from reliable resources like Passmark.

The good thing is that you can use Passmark’s CPU benchmarks list to compare different kinds of CPUs with just one click.

Moreover, if you’re not a geek and want to explore more, we’ve already covered a detailed guide on what PC benchmarking is and methods to benchmark your PC using different processor comparison tools.

Cache Performance Is King

The cache is one of the most under-appreciated parts of a CPU. In fact, a cache with poor specs could be slowing down your PC. So, you should always check the cache specs of a processor before you purchase it.

Cache is essentially RAM for your processor, which means that the processor uses the cache to store all of the functions it has recently performed. Whenever those functions are requested again, the processor can draw the data from the cache instead of performing them a second time, thus making it faster.

Integrated Graphics Matter, Too

Intel and AMD have combined the CPU and the graphics card into an APU. If you’ve ever purchased or built a gaming-oriented PC, you may know the difference between an APU, CPU, and GPU.

Because of recent technological changes, new processors can now usually handle the graphics needs of most people without requiring a separate graphics card.

These graphics chipsets also vary in performance depending on the processor. Again, you can’t compare an AMD to an Intel here, and even comparing within the same family can be confusing. For example, Intel has Intel HD, Intel Iris, and Intel Iris Pro graphics, but not every Iris is better than HD.

Meanwhile, AMD’s Athlon and FX series come without graphics chips but cost more than the APU-centric A-Series, so you’ll have to buy a graphics card if you’re getting an Athlon or FX processor.

In short, graphics processing on CPUs is still quite confusing, but you still need to pay attention to it! The best option is to consult third-party benchmarks and look for recommendations.

Futuremark developed the 3DMark graphics test, which is one of the best free Windows benchmark tools out there. You can check the 3DMark Physics Score of any processor and compare it to others in Futuremark’s processor list, which should give you a fair idea of which CPU has better graphics.

The Best Way to Compare CPUs

All of these factors come together to make CPU comparisons a difficult proposition. How do you know which one you should buy? Here are a few tips that may help.

The easiest and best way is to head to CPUBoss. CPUBoss is one of the best sites for an effective CPU comparison in minutes. This site compares two processors and gives ratings and explains the differences between the two in terms that any non-techie can also understand.

CPUBoss doesn’t perform its own benchmarks but instead collates them from different sources like PassMark, PCMark, CompuBench, GeekBench, SkyDiver, and more. It basically saves you the trip of going to many sites.

The CPUBoss score is a safe parameter in making your purchase decision, with the simple idea that whichever processor scores higher is the better one. CPUBoss also compares integrated graphics, telling you which APU has the better graphics performance.

In case you are looking for more details than what CPUBoss provides, we’d recommend the AnandTech CPU Benchmark Tool. Here you can browse in-depth benchmarks conducted by one of the best independent hardware review sites and even compare two processors side-by-side.

Other Factors That Affect Performance

When it comes to overall performance, it’s important to remember that your processor is only as good as the rest of your hardware. If you buy a high-end processor but only put in 2GB of RAM, the processor’s performance will be slowed down.

Apart from the processor and RAM, additional factors affecting your PC’s performance include the number of apps operating in the background, throttling issues, clock speed, and so on.

CPU comparison & rankings | Compare processors

CPU comparison & rankings | Compare processors — Versus

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    326 EUR

    AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

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    64points

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    64points

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    64points

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    64points

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    64points

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    63points

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    63points

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    AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX

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    63points

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    63points

    AMD Ryzen 9 4900H

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    63points

    CPU comparison

    AMD Ryzen 5 5500U

    vs

    Intel Core i5-1135G7

    AMD Ryzen 3 3250U

    vs

    Intel Core i3-1115G4

    AMD Ryzen 3 5300U

    vs

    Intel Core i3-1115G4

    AMD Ryzen 7 5700U

    vs

    Intel Core i7-1165G7

    AMD Ryzen 7 3700U

    vs

    Intel Core i5-10210U

    AMD Ryzen 5 5500U

    vs

    Intel Core i3-1115G4

    AMD Ryzen 5 3500U

    vs

    Intel Core i5-10210U

    Intel Core i3-1115G4

    vs

    Intel Core i5-1135G7

    AMD Ryzen 7 5800H

    vs

    Intel Core i7-11800H

    Intel Celeron N4020

    vs

    Intel Core i3-1005G1

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    Best laptop CPUs in 2021: AMD vs. Intel vs. Apple

    (Image credit: Intel)

    A computer’s processor is its brain, the component where most of the «thinking» happens. A faster CPU (central processing unit) lets you crunch spreadsheets, surf web pages, play games or edit photos faster, but a higher-wattage processor may also give you worse battery life.

    When you’re buying a laptop, you’ll usually see the name of the processor listed prominently in every product description. However, just seeing the CPU model name, without any context, can be confusing. Is a laptop with a Core i7-1185G7 CPU faster than one with a Ryzen 7 5700U? And what about Core i9 chips or Apple’s M1 processor? How much speed do you really need, anyway?

    Most laptops today are powered by an Intel CPU, though there are several models that use AMD processors and some that use Qualcomm Snapdragon processors. Of course, Apple is transitioning its laptops to use custom M-series silicon. Even if you only look at Intel’s lineup, there are more than two dozen different models you might see featured in a brand new notebook. Fortunately, learning the basics isn’t too difficult.

    TLDR; Which CPU Do I Need?

    We detail all the different CPU types and their capabilities below, but if you just want the broad strokes, we’ve got a small cheat sheet below.

    Purpose Recommended CPU Sample SKUs Typical Battery Life
    Workstation / Gaming Intel Core i5 / i7 H Series; Ryzen 7 / 9 H Series Core i9-11900H, Ryzen 9 5980HS 3 to 20 hours
    Everyday Productivity w/ a Boost Intel Core i7 U Series / AMD Ryzen 7 U series / Apple M1 Core i7-1185H, Ryzen 7 5800H, Apple M1 7 to 17 hours
    Everyday Productivity Intel Core i5 U Series / AMD Ryzen Mobile 5 Core i5-1155G7, Ryzen 5 5600H 8 to 17  hours
    Super Thin (Mediocre Performance) Intel Core i3 Core i3-1115G4, Ryzen 3 5300U 5 to 9 hours
    Budget Laptops, Low Performance Intel Celeron, Pentium Celeron G5905; Pentium Gold G6505 4 to 6 hours

    How to Read a CPU Model Name

    When you’re glancing at spec sheets, the name of the processor has a confusing jumble of numbers and letters.

    (Image credit: Intel)

    The first word in the processor name is the brand, which is usually «Intel Core» but may also be labeled as Xeon, Celeron, Pentium or Atom. There’s also «AMD Ryzen» and «AMD FX.» Following the brand, you see the brand modifier, which is most often i3, i5 or i7, or for AMD, Ryzen 5, 7 or 9.

    On Intel processors, the first number after the hyphen is the generation indicator; the latest generation is the 11th so the very newest CPUs have an 11. However, some laptops that are currently for sale haven’t been updated to the latest platform yet and will still have a 10 (for 10th Gen) in the model number.

    Then you’ll see some combination of a two or a three-digit number significying the specific SKU for the chip. Following that is a G and a number, identifying the level of graphics. This varies from older chips that used a single letter (U, Y, H).  The line is extremely important because it tells you roughly how much wattage this processor needs.

    On AMD processors, the numbers and names are more straightforward. The company’s new Ryzen 5000 CPUs are named Ryzen 5, which competes with Core i5 U series and Ryzen 7, which competes with Intel’s Core i7 U series. There is also a Ryzen 9 to go against Intel’s Core i9 chips.

    AMD Ryzen vs. Intel Core vs. Apple M1

    For many years, AMD processors only appeared in budget systems with mediocre performance and battery life. However, late in 2017, the company got its swagger back, releasing its new Ryzen Mobile platform. Then, in 2020, AMD made a huge leap by debuting its Ryzen 4000-series chips, many of which outperformed their Intel counterparts. Then, earlier this year, AMD released its Ryzen 5000 chips, like the one in the Asus Zephyrus G15.

    (Image credit: AMD)

    At this point, we can confidently recommend that you don’t pay extra to get an Intel Core i5 or Core i7 if there is a cheaper AMD-powered version because the Ryzen 4000 and Ryzen 5000-series chips are so similar in performance. 

    Other AMD chips that are non-Ryzen are less capable than a modern Core i5 or Core i7 and should only be considered when getting a very low price, rather than strong performance is your main concern.  

    As for Apple, it currently has a single custom laptop chip called the M1. So far, it’s the most powerful mobile CPU in existence so long as your software runs natively on its ARM-based architecture. So far, the M1 is available in only the MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro but we expect to see an upgraded version of the chip (perhaps the M1X?) in the rumored 16-inch MacBook Pro and 14-inch MacBook Pro. If you’re curious how the M1 stacks up against Intel chips, see our M1 vs. Intel comparison guide. 

    Core i3 vs. Core i5 vs. Core i7

    Most Intel CPUs you’ll see on laptops that cost over $400 are branded as Core i3, Core i5 or Core i7. As the numbering suggests, Core i3 is the slowest, i5 is in the middle, and i7 is fast and Core i9 is the fastest. Usually, the i5 model is more than adequate for a regular, everyday user who is not doing intensive graphics work, engineering, science or gaming. 

    Both Core i5, Core i7 and Core i9 support turbo boost, which allows the clock speed to go higher based on the task, and Hyper-Threading, which gives you two unique threads (aka virtual cores) for each core.  

    Which Intel and AMD Gen should I buy?

    The latest is (almost) always greatest when it comes to CPU generations so we recommend looking for Intel 11th Gen and AMD Ryzen 5000-series chips. Again, 11th Gen Intel chips are denoted by the first two letters after the hyphen: Core i7-1185G7. For AMD, you know it’s a Ryzen 5000 chip if the SKU number starts with a five. For example, AMD Ryzen 7 5700U. 

    Intel made great strides when it moved from 10th Gen to 11th Gen, especially when it comes to graphics performance with its Iris Xe chip, so we recommend getting the newest Intel processors. AMD, on the other hand, impressed us so much last year that an AMD 4000-series chip is still recommended at the right price. 

    CPU Specs: Cores, Hyper-Threading, Clock Speed

    When you read about any individual CPU model, you’ll see that, just like the laptop it powers, it has a complete set of specs. The most important specs are these:

    • Cores:  The processor within a processor, a Core is capable of working on one discrete task while the other core(s) does something else. Most laptop CPUs have four to eight, but some of the higher-performance models have eight cores. With 11th Gen Core, mainstream Core i5 and Core i7 laptops will now have four cores as do AMD Ryzen 5000 U-series chips.
    • Hyper-Threading: A process where the CPU splits each physical Core into virtual Cores called threads. Most of Intel’s dual-core CPUs use hyper-threading to provide four threads while its quad-core CPUs provide eight threads.
    • Clock Speed: Measured in gigahertz, this is the number of cycles per second that the CPU can execute. A higher number is better, but this is far from the only factor in processor speed.
    • Turbo Boost: Temporarily raises the clock speed from its base frequency to a higher one in order to complete a task more quickly. Most Core i9, Core i5 and i7 CPUs have this feature, but Core i3 models do not. The default frequency is listed as «processor base frequency» while the highest frequency is listed as «max turbo frequency. «
    • Cache: A small amount of RAM that lives directly on the CPU die, the cache stores frequently used information to speed up repetitive tasks. Most CPUs have between 1 and 4MB of cache.
    • TDP (Thermal Design Power): The number of watts the CPU uses. More watts means better performance, but higher temperatures and greater power consumption.
    • vPro or Ryzen Pro: A built-in remote management feature that’s designed for corporate IT departments. Many business laptops have CPUs with vPro, but consumer systems do not.

    Processor Lines (from Most to Least Powerful)

    Choosing the right processor line is much more important than picking Core i5 over Core i3. Intel has a few main lines, each of which has its own set of Core i3s, i5s and i7s. Each line has a different TDP (Thermal Design Power), ranging from 7 watts all the way up to 45 watts for an H series.

    A higher TDP means speedier processing, but more heat and energy use.  However, just because a processor has a really low TDP, that doesn’t mean laptops that use it will have longer battery life. For example, some systems we’ve tested with 9-watt CPUs have had below-average battery life, because they also had low-capacity batteries or power-hungry screens.

    Good For: Engineering, Research and Professional Animation
    Bad For: Battery Life, Affordability, Weight 

    For the very highest-end mobile workstations, there’s Intel’s Xeon W processor. Laptops with this processor inside are capable of doing more calculations so they can develop 3D animations or run complex simulations for someone like a medical researcher or an engineer. Xeon W processors have a 35-125W TDP, six or eight physical cores and come with both hyperthreading and turbo boost. Don’t expect great battery life or low prices.

    The latest Xeon processors, which now have 11th Gen architecture, are the Intel Xeon W-11855M and W-11955M. Since they’re made for business, all Xeon processors have vPro management technology built in.

    H Series: Six-Core, High Performance

    Best For: Gamers, Creative Professionals, Power Users
    Bad For: Portability, Affordability, Battery Life

    If you’re a power user or gamer, a laptop with an H processor is probably your best choice. H Series processors have six or eight cores instead of the four you’ll find on most other Intel CPUs. H-series processors also have a TDP of 45 watts, which means that the laptops holding them are either going to have poor battery life or large batteries. Because they generate more heat than U series chips, you won’t find H CPUs in super-light or thin laptops.

    You may see processors labeled as either H, HQ or HK. H and HQ are standard while the HK denotes a processor that has been unlocked for overclocking. You’ll only find those in high-end gaming laptops.

    Common H Series CPUs (4 cores)
    Model Base Clock Turbo Cache GPU Cores/Threads vPro
    Core i9-11980HK 3. 3 GHz 4.5 GHz 24MB Intel UHD 8/16 No
    Core i7-11900H 2.1 GHz 4.4 GHz 24MB Intel UHD 8/16 No
    Core i7-11800H 1.9 GHz 4.2 GHz 24MB Intel UHD 8/16 No
    Core i5-11400H 2.2 GHz 4.1 GHz 12MB Intel UHD 6/12 No
    Core i5-11260H 2.1 GHz 4.0 GHz 12MB Intel UHD 6/12 No
    Core W-11955M 2.1 GHz 4.5 GHz 24MB Intel UHD 8 Yes
    Core i9-11950H 2.1 GHz 4.5 GHz 24MB Intel UHD 6/12 Yes
    W-11855M 2.6 GHz 4.4 GHz 18MB Intel UHD 6/12 Yes
    Core i7-11850H 2.1 GHz 4.3 GHz 24MB Intel UHD 4 Yes
    Core i5-11500H 2. 4 GHz 4.2 GHz 12MB Intel UHD 6/12 Yes

    U Series: Everyday Performance

    Good For: Productivity, Content Consumption, Battery Life
    Bad For: Gaming, Professional Animation

    If you’re looking for a «typical» laptop experience with solid performance and the possibility of good battery life, then an Intel U Series is for you. In particular, a Core i5 U-series CPU such as the Core i5-1135G7 should be more than adequate for most everyday users, whether they are consumers who want to surf the web or business users who need to edit spreadsheets. There is a reason the HP Envy 13 is the best value laptop on the market.

    As of spring 2021 many mainstream and business laptops are shipping with Intel 11th Gen Core chips which come with four cores and 8 threads. 

    Most U Series processors have a TDP of 12-28W, which is the sweet spot between solid performance and good battery life, but does require active cooling in the form of a fan. There are a few U series CPUs with 28-watt TDPs, though only a handful of laptops use them. With a large battery and a power-efficient screen, U series laptops can get well over 10 hours of endurance with some high-end systems getting closer to 20 hours.

    A number of U Series laptops feature Iris Xe graphics processor onboard. Iris Xe delivers significantly better 3D graphics performance than the base-level Intel UHD graphics.

    Common Intel U Series CPUs (2 cores, 4 threads)
    Model Base Clock Turbo Cache TDP (w) GPU
    Core i7-1195G7 2.9 Ghz 4.6 Ghz 12MB 12-28W Iris Xe
    Core i7-1185G7 3.0 GHz 4.3 GHz 12MB 12-28W Iris Xe
    Core i7-1165G7 2.8 GHz 4.1 GHz 12MB 12-28W Iris Xe
    Core i5-1155G7 2. 5 GHz 4.3 GHz 8MB 12-28W Iris Xe
    Core i5-1145G7 2.6 GHz 4.0 GHz 8MB 12-28W Iris Xe
    Core i5-1135G7 2.4 GHz 3.8 GHz 8MB 12-28W Iris Xe
    Core i3-1125G4 2 GHz 3.3 GHz 8MB 12-28W UHD
    Core i3-1115G4 3 GHz 4.1 GHz 6MB 12-28W UHD

    Good For: Portability, Fanless Design, Light Productivity
    Bad For: Battery Life, Serious Number Crunching

    When you’re shopping for a laptop, be wary of the Y series (now called UP4), which you may see branded with Core i5 / Core i7 . Intel Y Series processors have a very-low TDP of 7 watts, which allows manufacturers to use them in fanless, super-thin laptops. Unfortunately, most of those laptops also have low-capacity batteries or high-powered screens so they actually end up with worse battery life than competitors with more powerful U-series (UP3) processors.

    Common Intel Y Series CPUs (2 cores, 4 threads)
    Model Base Clock Turbo Cache GPU
    Core i7-1160G7 1.2 GHz 3.6 12MB Iris Xe
    Core i5-1130G7 1.1 GHz 3.4 GHz 8MB Iris Xe
    Core i3-1120G4 1.1 GHz 3 GHz 8MB UHD
    Core i3-1110G4 1.8 GHz 3.9 GHz 6GB UHD

    Celeron / Pentium: For Those Who Don’t Care

    Good For: Web Surfing, Saving money
    Bad For: Gaming, Serious Productivity, Video Editing

    If you’re looking at a laptop that costs between $200 and $400, there’s a good chance it has an Intel Celeron or Pentium series CPU. These budget-minded processors deliver performance that’s just good enough for web surfing, email and light productivity. Celeron chips are very common in Chromebooks, because Google’s browser-based OS doesn’t require as much horsepower as Windows.  If you’re buying a Windows laptop, get one with Celeron / Pentium only if price is a primary concern. One excellent example is the Microsoft Surface Go, which uses an Intel Pentium Gold processor instead of the Intel Core chips found in the Surface Laptop 4 or Surface Pro 7. 

    Common Celeron / Pentium Series CPUs
    Model Base Clock Turbo Cache GPU Cores TDP
    Pentium Gold G6506 4.2 GHz N/A 4MB Intel UHD Graphics 630 2 35W
    Pentium Gold G6405 4.1 GHz N/A 4MB Intel UHD Graphics 610 2 58W
    Celeron G5905 3. 5 GHz N/A 4MB UHD 610 2 58W
    Celeron G5925 3.6 GHz N/A 4MB UHD 610 2 58W

    Atom: Good Battery Life, Weak Performance

    Good For: Saving Money, Long Battery Life, Light Weight
    Bad For: Multitasking, Serious Productivity

    Intel’s cheapest processor line and largely on the way out, Atom appears in super-cheap Windows laptops or tablets. Almost all Atom CPUs have four cores and are extremely low power, allowing them to have excellent battery life, but the lowest level of performance. We recommend that you buy an Atom-powered laptop only as a secondary device for an adult or a primary for children. Atom is good enough for surfing the web and watching videos but struggles with content creation and productivity tasks. Most current-generation cheap laptops now use Celeron chips rather than Atom so you’ll probably find Atom only on older systems.

    Common Atom Series CPUs (4 cores, 4 threads)
    Model Base Clock Turbo Cores Cache
    Atom C3338R 1.8 GHz 2.2 GHz 2 4MB
    Atom C3758R 2.4 GHz N/A 8 2MB
    Atom C3558R 2.4 GHz N/A 4 2MB

    Integrated Graphics

    All Intel and AMD laptop CPUs come with built-in graphics processors (GPUs). On most Core i3/i5/i7/i9 CPUs of any line, these GPUs are named Iris Plus or Iris Xe, or AMD Radeon. For higher-end 11th Gen Intel processors, the integrated graphics is called Iris Xe, which is significantly faster but still no much for discrete graphics chips from Nvidia and AMD.

    The integrated GPUs are right on the CPU die so laptop manufacturers can’t mix and match them. A Core i7-1195G7 CPU will always come with the leading Iris Xe graphics while a weaker Core i3-1125G4 is stuck with Intel UHD graphics. 

    Generally speaking, integrated GPUs are good enough for productivity, web surfing, video playback and either casual gaming or gaming at low settings. If you want to do high-res video editing, professional animation or serious gaming, you need a discrete GPU.

    Other Components Matter Too

    It’s important to remember, though, that the CPU is not the only determinant of performance when shopping for the best laptop, and that even the slowest CPUs can provide a decent user experience when paired with other good components. For most people, picking a Solid State Drive over a hard drive will make their computers a lot more responsive than paying extra to get a Core i7 rather than a Core i5. And for graphics performance, having a powerful discrete GPU (graphics processing unit) is even more important than having the fastest CPU. If you’re curious about the latest graphics, see our coverage on Nvidia RTX 30-series and AMD Radeon 6000M series graphics cards.

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    • 13 Ways to Make a Slow Laptop Faster
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    Phillip Tracy is the assistant managing editor at Laptop Mag where he reviews laptops, phones and other gadgets while covering the latest industry news. After graduating with a journalism degree from the University of Texas at Austin, Phillip became a tech reporter at the Daily Dot. There, he wrote reviews for a range of gadgets and covered everything from social media trends to cybersecurity. Prior to that, he wrote for RCR Wireless News covering 5G and IoT. When he’s not tinkering with devices, you can find Phillip playing video games, reading, traveling or watching soccer.

    5 Sites to Compare CPU Speed and Performance from Benchmarks Reports • Raymond.CC

    Home » Hardware » 5 Sites to Compare CPU Speed and Performance from Benchmarks Reports

    Everybody would like their PC or laptop to be faster and the obvious solution would be to go out and purchase a new machine or upgrade the components in the computer you currently own. There are many pieces of hardware that can improve the performance of a computer, such as an SSD, more or faster memory, or the CPU (Central Processing Unit). As the processor is the central brain of a computer, it makes sense that an upgraded CPU would help improve performance across the board.

    Many games would run faster, video and audio encoding would take less time, Windows would generally work faster and resource intensive tasks would be completed at a quicker pace. The trouble with buying or researching a CPU is there are hundreds on sale at any one time from the likes of Intel and AMD, and thousands have been released over the last few decades. That causes a problem because it becomes harder to find the right CPU which offers the best value or performance you are looking for.

    A simple solution is to use a website that lists processor performance and allows you to compare directly between different chips, such as your current and another CPU, so it’s much easier to see what sort of a gains you could get. Here we have 5 websites that list CPU benchmark results and allow direct like for like comparisons between processors

    1. PassMark Benchmark Charts

    Besides the Futuremark suites, Passmark is probably the other most notable benchmarking software. Scores are based on their own Performance Test suite and there are several charts based on high/mid/low end, value, single threads, socket types and power performance. There’s also other charts for graphics cards, hard drives, RAM and mobile devices.

    The Mega List is useful to sort by socket type or get quick details about clock speed while the searchable Model List is a complete list of all CPU scores where you can easily sort by rank, score, value or alphabetical order. The Model List is also the page which allows direct comparison of up to three different processors. Simply look for the CPU in the list or type part of the model name into the search box, hover over its entry in the list and click Compare. Then click the Compare button in the box to the right once you have up to three.

    The comparison page will show some basic information for each processor selected along with the Passmark Performance Test score in the top graph and the relative value of each CPU based on its price and performance at the bottom. Clicking on the model name in the main list will take you to the more visually appealing High, Mid and Low charts with the selected CPU highlighted in red.


    2. CPU World Benchmarks

    If you want to get technical specifications of just about any processor going back decades, then CPU World is the place to visit. The desktop CPU benchmarks page allows you to see the scores for a single processor, compare two or more, or even a whole range of chips with a few clicks.

    After selecting the Manufacturer from the drop down, you can either choose the family type (Celeron/Core i7 etc) or the socket type (939/1155/775 etc). Further down you can choose a specific processor by it’s model name or part name. Clicking an Add to selected button to the right will add the individual chip to the list or the whole range from the family or socket type. Once all required CPUs are added to the list press Show Benchmark Chart.

    The results page will give a number of different scores based on the selected test. These are changed from the drop down and include results for 3DMark, 7-Zip, Cinebench, FLAC encode, h364 encode, Crystalmark, PCMark, WinRAR, Sandra, Superpi and wPrime. Clicking the CPU model in the results will take you to the full information page, or the orange question mark to the right gives a brief detail popup window. The list of available CPUs doesn’t include some of the latest from Intel or AMD.


    3. AnandTech Benchmarks

    AnandTech is a well known and respected hardware news and review site that’s been around since the 1990’s. The AnandTech benchmark pages have a range of results for different types of hardware, including SSDs, graphic cards, laptops, tablets and CPU coolers in addition to CPUs.

    The results can be viewed in one of three ways, either browse the complete list of CPUs by each benchmark result, list the scores for an individual CPU or compare two different CPUs in a single set of results. To browse what all chips scored in a single test select the category under Browse CPU Benchmarks and then below select the individual test to show the results. The individual tests will change depending on whether you choose gaming, application workloads or SYSMark scores in the category drop down.

    To get all scores for a single processor simply select the chip in the “Choose First Product” drop down and press the View Single Product button. To add a second CPU to compare with the first, enter it in the Second Product drop down and click View Comparison. Somewhere in the region of 250 different processors are available to view or compare from both AMD and Intel, including the latest Skylake chips.


    4. HWBOT Comparisons

    HWBOT is a site for enthusiasts and is dedicated to overclocking. They even have leagues, competitions and world record charts for the most extreme tweakers. There is also a page dedicated to comparing CPU benchmark scores over a number of tests along with the basic specification of each chosen processor.

    By default the HWBOT comparison chart lists and selects a number of popular and higher end CPUs, such as i7’s and i5’s, untick each one if you don’t want them in the comparison. If the CPU you want to view is not listed then enter a few characters of its model name into the search box and click on the search result to add the chip to the list. This immediately displays the CPU specification at the top and adds it to the benchmark scoring chart at the bottom.

    The benchmark chart displays the scores for all processors you have selected. There are a number of tests to compare from, including PiFast, SuperPi, PCMark, Cinebench, WinRAR, Geekbench and HWBOT’s own test suite. Just tick or untick what you want to view and the results update instantly. One thing we’re not sure of is whether these scores also include overclocked scores or are results based on stock speeds alone.


    5. CPUBoss

    CPUBoss is a website dedicated to head to head comparisons of a wide range of processors dating back over 15 years. As well as specs, there’s a range of other useful information such as internal and external reviews, technical differences between compared chips, user comments and benchmark scores. There are also companion SSDBoss and GPUBoss websites.

    You can get all the information in one of two ways, for a single CPU simply enter all or part of its model name into the search box, this will show everything the site has available for the particular CPU. To compare two CPUs enter all or part of the model names into each box and click the Compare button, this shows a direct like for like comparison.

    In addition to the CPUBoss review which bases its scores on overall performance, overclocking and value, there are also individual third party results from the likes of 3DMark, Geekbench, Cinebench, Passmark, Sysmark and X.264. Note the number of benchmark results will differ depending on which CPUs are being compared as both need to have been tested to show the result, so only showing two or three scores is not uncommon with CPUs from different generations.

    Note: There are obviously other websites which offer a similar service like those above which we haven’t listed, they include Tom’s Hardware Performance Charts and Userbenchmark. com.

    Compare CPU — Compare PC Processor Gaming Benchmarks at 1080p, 1440p, Ultrawide, 4K

    Compare CPU

    Graphics Card
    AMD Radeon HD 6850 — $ 199AMD Radeon HD 6870 — $ 199AMD Radeon HD 6950 — $ 250AMD Radeon HD 6970 — $ 299AMD Radeon HD 6990 — $ 699AMD Radeon HD 7750 — $ 140AMD Radeon HD 7790 — $ 149AMD Radeon HD 7850 — $ 249AMD Radeon HD 7950 — $ 149AMD Radeon HD 7970 — $ 299AMD Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition — $ 299AMD Radeon HD 7990 — $ 999AMD Radeon R7 250 — $ 95AMD Radeon R7 265 — $ 149AMD Radeon R7 370 — $ 202AMD Radeon R9 270 — $ 275AMD Radeon R9 280 — $ 350AMD Radeon R9 280X — $ 350AMD Radeon R9 285 — $ 380AMD Radeon R9 290 — $ 310AMD Radeon R9 290X — $ 399AMD Radeon R9 295X2 — $ 1499AMD Radeon R9 380 — $ 299AMD Radeon R9 380X — $ 229AMD Radeon R9 390 — $ 465AMD Radeon R9 390X — $ 495AMD Radeon R9 FURY — $ 549AMD Radeon R9 FURY X — $ 649AMD Radeon R9 Nano — $ 1529AMD Radeon RX 460 — $ 140AMD Radeon RX 470 — $ 342AMD Radeon RX 480 — $ 399AMD Radeon RX 550 — $ 74AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB — $ 169AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB — $ 199AMD Radeon RX 560 — $ 99AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT — $ 279AMD Radeon RX 570 — $ 123AMD Radeon RX 5700 — $ 349AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT — $ 399AMD Radeon RX 580 — $ 151AMD Radeon RX 590 — $ 214AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT — $ 379AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT — $ 479AMD Radeon RX 6800 — $ 579AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT — $ 649AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT — $ 999AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 — $ 269AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 — $ 419AMD Radeon VII — $ 664ATI Radeon HD 4870 — $ 299NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 — $ 79NVIDIA GeForce GT 640 — $ 79NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450 — $ 199NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 — $ 129NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti — $ 129NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB — $ 170NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB — $ 159NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 — $ 329NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — $ 503NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 — $ 522NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti — $ 807NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 — $ 149NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER — $ 160NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 — $ 220NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER — $ 229NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti — $ 279NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 — $ 449NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 — $ 299NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280 — $ 649NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285 — $ 249NVIDIA GeForce GTX 470 — $ 299NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 — $ 499NVIDIA GeForce GTX 550 Ti — $ 199NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 — $ 153NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti — $ 220NVIDIA GeForce GTX 570 — $ 349NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 — $ 399NVIDIA GeForce GTX 590 — $ 699NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 — $ 49NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti — $ 64NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost — $ 169NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 — $ 79NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 Ti — $ 299NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 — $ 79NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 — $ 485NVIDIA GeForce GTX 690 — $ 439NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti — $ 279NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 — $ 320NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 — $ 179NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 — $ 355NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Ti — $ 410NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 — $ 89NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960 — $ 89NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 — $ 449NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 — $ 249NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti — $ 619NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN — $ 650NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN BLACK — $ 999NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X — $ 1099NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 — $ 349NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER — $ 400NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 — $ 469NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER — $ 499NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 — $ 693NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER — $ 699NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti — $ 1187NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050 — $ 200NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050 Ti — $ 249NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 — $ 329NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti — $ 399NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 — $ 499NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti — $ 599NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 — $ 699NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti — $ 799NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 — $ 1499NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4050 — $ 200NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4060 — $ 329NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4060 Ti — $ 399NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4070 — $ 499NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4080 — $ 699NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4080 Ti — $ 799NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4090 — $ 1499NVIDIA TITAN RTX — $ 2499NVIDIA TITAN V — $ 2999NVIDIA TITAN Xp — $ 1199

    Game
    Anthem — 2019Apex Legends — 2019Ashes of the Singularity — 2016Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation — 2016Assassin’s Creed Odyssey — 2018Assassin’s Creed Origins — 2017Assassin’s Creed Valhalla — 2020Batman: Arkham City — 2011Battlefield 1 — 2016Battlefield 2042 — 2021Battlefield 3 — 2011Battlefield 4 — 2013Battlefield V — 2018Bioshock Infinite — 2013Borderlands 3 — 2019Call of Duty Modern Warfare — 2019Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 — 2018Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War — 2020Civilization V — 2010Civilization: Beyond Earth — 2014Company of Heroes 2 — 2013Counter-Strike: Global Offensive — 2012Crysis 3 — 2013Crysis: Warhead — 2008Crysis: Warhead (DX10) — 2008Cyberpunk 2077 — 2020Dawn of War III — 2017Death Stranding — 2020Destiny 2 — 2017Deus Ex: Mankind Divided — 2016DiRT 3 — 2011DiRT Rally — 2015DiRT: Showdown — 2012Dishonored 2 — 2016Doom — 2016Dragon Age: Inquisition — 2014Elden Ring — 2022F1 2016 — 2016F1 2018 — 2018F1 2019 — 2019Fallout 76 — 2018Far Cry 3 — 2012Far Cry 4 — 2014Far Cry 5 — 2018Far Cry New Dawn — 2019Final Fantasy XV — 2018For Honor — 2017Fortnite Battle Royale — 2017Forza Horizon 4 — 2018Forza Horizon 5 — 2021Forza Motorsport 7 — 2017GRID 2 — 2013GRID Autosport — 2014Gears of War 5 — 2019Ghost Recon Wildlands — 2017God of War — 2022Godfall — 2020Grand Theft Auto V — 2015GreedFall — 2019Halo Infinite — 2021Hitman — 2016Hitman 2 — 2018Hitman: Absolution — 2012Just Cause 4 — 2018League of Legends — 2009Marvel’s Avengers — 2020Metro Exodus — 2019Metro: 2033 — 2010Metro: Last Light — 2013Microsoft Flight Simulator — 2020Minecraft — 2009Monster Hunter: World — 2018Need For Speed — 2015Need For Speed: Heat — 2019Need For Speed: Payback — 2017Overwatch — 2016Overwatch 2 — 2022PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds — 2017Portal 2 — 2011Project CARS — 2015Project CARS 2 — 2017Rainbow Six Siege — 2015Red Dead Redemption 2 — 2019Resident Evil 2 — 2019Rise of the Tomb Raider — 2016Rocket League — 2015Shadow of Mordor — 2014Shadow of War — 2017Shadow of the Tomb Raider — 2018Sleeping Dogs — 2012Starcraft II — 2010Strange Brigade — 2018The Division — 2016The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim — 2011The Talos Principle — 2014The Witcher 3 — 2015Thief — 2014Total War: Attila — 2015Total War: Rome 2 — 2013Total War: Shogun 2 — 2011Total War: Warhammer — 2016Total War: Warhammer II — 2017Valorant — 2020Wolfenstein II — 2017World War Z — 2019

    Processor
    AMD Athlon 5000 Dual-Core — $ 100AMD Athlon 5200 Dual-Core — $ 30AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+ — $ 130AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4400+ — $ 60AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4600+ — $ 360AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4800+ — $ 460AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5000+ — $ 331. 5AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5200+ — $ 53.1AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5400+ — $ 53AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5600+ — $ 150AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5800+ — $ 25AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6000+ — $ 46AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6400+ — $ 260AMD Athlon 7550 Dual-Core — $ 60AMD Athlon 7750 Dual-Core — $ 148.7AMD Athlon 7850 Dual-Core — $ 209.7AMD Athlon Dual Core 5000B — $ 95AMD Athlon II X2 215 — $ 12AMD Athlon II X2 220 — $ 32.2AMD Athlon II X2 240 — $ 35AMD Athlon II X2 245 — $ 35AMD Athlon II X2 250 — $ 39AMD Athlon II X2 255 — $ 65.2AMD Athlon II X2 260 — $ 20AMD Athlon II X2 265 — $ 82.9AMD Athlon II X2 270 — $ 24AMD Athlon II X2 B22 — $ 36AMD Athlon II X2 B24 — $ 40AMD Athlon II X2 B28 — $ 49.1AMD Athlon II X3 425 — $ 104.2AMD Athlon II X3 435 — $ 50AMD Athlon II X3 440 — $ 47AMD Athlon II X3 445 — $ 91AMD Athlon II X3 450 — $ 40AMD Athlon II X3 455 — $ 116.9AMD Athlon II X3 460 — $ 50AMD Athlon II X4 620 — $ 60AMD Athlon II X4 630 — $ 43AMD Athlon II X4 631 Quad-Core — $ 80AMD Athlon II X4 635 — $ 70AMD Athlon II X4 640 — $ 80AMD Athlon II X4 641 Quad-Core — $ 91. 5AMD Athlon II X4 645 — $ 50AMD Athlon X4 740 Quad Core — $ 277AMD Athlon X4 760K Quad Core — $ 46AMD Athlon X4 840 — $ 78.7AMD Athlon X4 845 — $ 50AMD Athlon X4 860K — $ 64AMD Athlon X4 870K — $ 80AMD Athlon X4 880K — $ 90AMD Athlon X4 950 — $ 60AMD E2-3200 APU — $ 8AMD FX-4100 Quad-Core — $ 130AMD FX-4130 Quad-Core — $ 76AMD FX-4170 Quad-Core — $ 100AMD FX-4200 Quad-Core — $ 228.2AMD FX-4300 Quad-Core — $ 53.4AMD FX-4350 Quad-Core — $ 130AMD FX-6200 Six-Core — $ 340AMD FX-6300 Six-Core — $ 59AMD FX-6350 Six-Core — $ 130AMD FX-8120 Eight-Core — $ 100AMD FX-8150 Eight-Core — $ 383.5AMD FX-8300 Eight-Core — $ 80.6AMD FX-8320 Eight-Core — $ 79.5AMD FX-8320E Eight-Core — $ 98.9AMD FX-8350 Eight-Core — $ 80AMD FX-8370 Eight-Core — $ 135AMD FX-8370E Eight-Core — $ 180AMD FX-9370 Eight-Core — $ 178.9AMD FX-9590 Eight-Core — $ 122AMD Phenom 8250e Triple-Core — $ 47AMD Phenom 8450 Triple-Core — $ 30AMD Phenom 8600 Triple-Core — $ 53AMD Phenom 8600B Triple-Core — $ 53AMD Phenom 8650 Triple-Core — $ 50AMD Phenom 9100e Quad-Core — $ 40AMD Phenom 9150e Quad-Core — $ 40AMD Phenom 9350e Quad-Core — $ 3382. 1AMD Phenom 9450e Quad-Core — $ 105AMD Phenom 9500 Quad-Core — $ 60AMD Phenom 9550 Quad-Core — $ 40AMD Phenom 9600 Quad-Core — $ 50AMD Phenom 9600B Quad-Core — $ 147.2AMD Phenom 9650 Quad-Core — $ 55AMD Phenom 9750 Quad-Core — $ 60AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core — $ 50AMD Phenom 9950 Quad-Core — $ 180AMD Phenom II X2 545 — $ 44AMD Phenom II X2 550 — $ 50AMD Phenom II X2 555 — $ 142.1AMD Phenom II X2 565 — $ 30AMD Phenom II X2 B55 — $ 48AMD Phenom II X3 705e — $ 152.3AMD Phenom II X3 710 — $ 84.5AMD Phenom II X3 720 — $ 70AMD Phenom II X3 B73 — $ 75AMD Phenom II X4 805 — $ 174AMD Phenom II X4 810 — $ 116AMD Phenom II X4 820 — $ 75AMD Phenom II X4 840 — $ 90AMD Phenom II X4 905e — $ 212.4AMD Phenom II X4 910 — $ 100AMD Phenom II X4 910e — $ 157AMD Phenom II X4 920 — $ 67AMD Phenom II X4 925 — $ 160AMD Phenom II X4 940 — $ 120AMD Phenom II X4 945 — $ 50AMD Phenom II X4 955 — $ 130.2AMD Phenom II X4 960T — $ 135AMD Phenom II X4 965 — $ 59.5AMD Phenom II X4 B95 — $ 73AMD Phenom II X4 B97 — $ 90AMD Phenom II X6 1035T — $ 189AMD Phenom II X6 1045T — $ 175AMD Phenom II X6 1055T — $ 185AMD Phenom II X6 1075T — $ 260AMD Phenom II X6 1090T — $ 396. 1AMD Phenom II X6 1100T — $ 200AMD Phenom X3 8550 — $ 170AMD Ryzen 3 1200 — $ 95AMD Ryzen 3 1300X — $ 125AMD Ryzen 3 2200G — $ 98AMD Ryzen 3 3100 — $ 90AMD Ryzen 3 3200G — $ 99AMD Ryzen 3 3300X — $ 120AMD Ryzen 5 1400 — $ 134AMD Ryzen 5 1500X — $ 144.9AMD Ryzen 5 1600 — $ 155AMD Ryzen 5 1600X — $ 178.4AMD Ryzen 5 2400G — $ 159AMD Ryzen 5 2600 — $ 150AMD Ryzen 5 2600X — $ 210AMD Ryzen 5 3400G — $ 150AMD Ryzen 5 3500 — $ 148AMD Ryzen 5 3500X — $ 160.5AMD Ryzen 5 3600 — $ 199AMD Ryzen 5 3600X — $ 249AMD Ryzen 5 5500 — $ 160AMD Ryzen 5 5600X — $ 299AMD Ryzen 7 1700 — $ 190AMD Ryzen 7 1700X — $ 200AMD Ryzen 7 1800X — $ 250AMD Ryzen 7 2700 — $ 249.2AMD Ryzen 7 2700X — $ 305AMD Ryzen 7 3700X — $ 330AMD Ryzen 7 3800X — $ 399AMD Ryzen 7 5700X — $ 300AMD Ryzen 7 5800X — $ 399AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D — $ 450AMD Ryzen 9 3900X — $ 499AMD Ryzen 9 3950X — $ 750AMD Ryzen 9 5900X — $ 499AMD Ryzen 9 5950X — $ 710AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X — $ 350AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X — $ 420AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X — $ 680AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X — $ 900AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX — $ 1720Intel Core i3-10100 — $ 122Intel Core i3-10300 — $ 143Intel Core i3-11100 — $ 122Intel Core i3-11300 — $ 143Intel Core i3-12100 — $ 122Intel Core i3-12300 — $ 143Intel Core i3-2100 @ 3. 10GHz — $ 60Intel Core i3-2102 @ 3.10GHz — $ 58Intel Core i3-2105 @ 3.10GHz — $ 80Intel Core i3-2120 @ 3.30GHz — $ 30Intel Core i3-2125 @ 3.30GHz — $ 199Intel Core i3-2130 @ 3.40GHz — $ 70Intel Core i3-3210 @ 3.20GHz — $ 100Intel Core i3-3220 @ 3.30GHz — $ 34.9Intel Core i3-3225 @ 3.30GHz — $ 100Intel Core i3-3240 @ 3.40GHz — $ 46Intel Core i3-3245 @ 3.40GHz — $ 80Intel Core i3-3250 @ 3.50GHz — $ 95Intel Core i3-4130 @ 3.40GHz — $ 140Intel Core i3-4150 @ 3.50GHz — $ 260Intel Core i3-4160 @ 3.60GHz — $ 140Intel Core i3-4170 @ 3.70GHz — $ 150Intel Core i3-4330 @ 3.50GHz — $ 180Intel Core i3-4340 @ 3.60GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-4350 @ 3.60GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-4360 @ 3.70GHz — $ 280Intel Core i3-4370 @ 3.80GHz — $ 450Intel Core i3-530 @ 2.93GHz — $ 20Intel Core i3-540 @ 3.07GHz — $ 21Intel Core i3-550 @ 3.20GHz — $ 180Intel Core i3-560 @ 3.33GHz — $ 30Intel Core i3-6098P @ 3.60GHz — $ 133.7Intel Core i3-6100 @ 3.70GHz — $ 166.1Intel Core i3-6300 @ 3.80GHz — $ 143Intel Core i3-6320 @ 3.90GHz — $ 160Intel Core i3-7100 @ 3. 90GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-7300 @ 4.00GHz — $ 210Intel Core i3-7320 @ 4.10GHz — $ 174.8Intel Core i3-7350K @ 4.20GHz — $ 230Intel Core i3-8100 @ 3.60GHz — $ 130Intel Core i3-8300 @ 3.70GHz — $ 179.4Intel Core i3-8350K @ 4.00GHz — $ 184Intel Core i3-9100 @ 3.60GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-9100F @ 3.60GHz — $ 105Intel Core i3-9320 @ 3.70GHz — $ 162Intel Core i3-9350KF @ 4.00GHz — $ 224Intel Core i5 750S @ 2.40GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-10400 — $ 182Intel Core i5-10600K — $ 236.8Intel Core i5-11400 — $ 182Intel Core i5-11600K — $ 262Intel Core i5-12400 — $ 143Intel Core i5-12600K — $ 290Intel Core i5-2300 @ 2.80GHz — $ 80Intel Core i5-2310 @ 2.90GHz — $ 80Intel Core i5-2320 @ 3.00GHz — $ 195.3Intel Core i5-2380P @ 3.10GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-2400 @ 3.10GHz — $ 84Intel Core i5-2400S @ 2.50GHz — $ 65.7Intel Core i5-2405S @ 2.50GHz — $ 164.4Intel Core i5-2450P @ 3.20GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-2500 @ 3.30GHz — $ 105Intel Core i5-2500K @ 3.30GHz — $ 124Intel Core i5-2500S @ 2.70GHz — $ 75Intel Core i5-2550K @ 3. 40GHz — $ 130Intel Core i5-3330 @ 3.00GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-3330S @ 2.70GHz — $ 95Intel Core i5-3340 @ 3.10GHz — $ 262Intel Core i5-3340S @ 2.80GHz — $ 150Intel Core i5-3350P @ 3.10GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-3450 @ 3.10GHz — $ 128Intel Core i5-3450S @ 2.80GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-3470 @ 3.20GHz — $ 125Intel Core i5-3470S @ 2.90GHz — $ 140.1Intel Core i5-3475S @ 2.90GHz — $ 143.5Intel Core i5-3550 @ 3.30GHz — $ 330Intel Core i5-3550S @ 3.00GHz — $ 341Intel Core i5-3570 @ 3.40GHz — $ 140Intel Core i5-3570K @ 3.40GHz — $ 144Intel Core i5-3570S @ 3.10GHz — $ 285Intel Core i5-4430 @ 3.00GHz — $ 180Intel Core i5-4430S @ 2.70GHz — $ 160Intel Core i5-4440 @ 3.10GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-4440S @ 2.80GHz — $ 463Intel Core i5-4460 @ 3.20GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-4460S @ 2.90GHz — $ 660Intel Core i5-4570 @ 3.20GHz — $ 175Intel Core i5-4570S @ 2.90GHz — $ 221.6Intel Core i5-4590 @ 3.30GHz — $ 185Intel Core i5-4590S @ 3.00GHz — $ 198Intel Core i5-4670 @ 3.40GHz — $ 188Intel Core i5-4670K @ 3.40GHz — $ 250Intel Core i5-4670R @ 3. 00GHz — $ 276Intel Core i5-4690 @ 3.50GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-4690K @ 3.50GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-4690S @ 3.20GHz — $ 269.9Intel Core i5-5675C @ 3.10GHz — $ 400Intel Core i5-6400 @ 2.70GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-6402P @ 2.80GHz — $ 190Intel Core i5-650 @ 3.20GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-6500 @ 3.20GHz — $ 234.4Intel Core i5-655K @ 3.20GHz — $ 60Intel Core i5-660 @ 3.33GHz — $ 49Intel Core i5-6600 @ 3.30GHz — $ 220Intel Core i5-6600K @ 3.50GHz — $ 288.9Intel Core i5-661 @ 3.33GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-670 @ 3.47GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-680 @ 3.60GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-7400 @ 3.00GHz — $ 213.5Intel Core i5-750 @ 2.67GHz — $ 160.5Intel Core i5-7500 @ 3.40GHz — $ 210Intel Core i5-760 @ 2.80GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-7600 @ 3.50GHz — $ 240Intel Core i5-7600K @ 3.80GHz — $ 251Intel Core i5-7640X @ 4.00GHz — $ 250Intel Core i5-8400 @ 2.80GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-8500 @ 3.00GHz — $ 239Intel Core i5-8600 @ 3.10GHz — $ 244.5Intel Core i5-8600K @ 3.60GHz — $ 377.7Intel Core i5-9400 @ 2.90GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-9400F @ 2. 90GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-9600K @ 3.70GHz — $ 280Intel Core i5-9600KF @ 3.70GHz — $ 215Intel Core i7-10700K — $ 409.1Intel Core i7-11700K — $ 410Intel Core i7-12700K — $ 470Intel Core i7-2600 @ 3.40GHz — $ 150Intel Core i7-2600K @ 3.40GHz — $ 198Intel Core i7-2600S @ 2.80GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-2700K @ 3.50GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-3770 @ 3.40GHz — $ 179Intel Core i7-3770K @ 3.50GHz — $ 249Intel Core i7-3770S @ 3.10GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-3820 @ 3.60GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-3930K @ 3.20GHz — $ 399Intel Core i7-3960X @ 3.30GHz — $ 800Intel Core i7-3970X @ 3.50GHz — $ 954Intel Core i7-4770 @ 3.40GHz — $ 240Intel Core i7-4770K @ 3.50GHz — $ 285Intel Core i7-4770S @ 3.10GHz — $ 250Intel Core i7-4771 @ 3.50GHz — $ 300Intel Core i7-4790 @ 3.60GHz — $ 279Intel Core i7-4790K @ 4.00GHz — $ 307Intel Core i7-4790S @ 3.20GHz — $ 342.6Intel Core i7-4820K @ 3.70GHz — $ 500Intel Core i7-4930K @ 3.40GHz — $ 399Intel Core i7-4960X @ 3.60GHz — $ 770Intel Core i7-5775C @ 3.30GHz — $ 450Intel Core i7-5820K @ 3. 30GHz — $ 300Intel Core i7-5930K @ 3.50GHz — $ 499Intel Core i7-5960X @ 3.00GHz — $ 770Intel Core i7-6700 @ 3.40GHz — $ 433.7Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00GHz — $ 335Intel Core i7-6800K @ 3.40GHz — $ 420Intel Core i7-6850K @ 3.60GHz — $ 550Intel Core i7-6900K @ 3.20GHz — $ 1200Intel Core i7-6950X @ 3.00GHz — $ 1576Intel Core i7-7700 @ 3.60GHz — $ 325.1Intel Core i7-7700K @ 4.20GHz — $ 355Intel Core i7-7740X @ 4.30GHz — $ 349Intel Core i7-7800X @ 3.50GHz — $ 370Intel Core i7-7820X @ 3.60GHz — $ 930Intel Core i7-8086K @ 4.00GHz — $ 553Intel Core i7-860 @ 2.80GHz — $ 290Intel Core i7-860S @ 2.53GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-870 @ 2.93GHz — $ 310Intel Core i7-8700 @ 3.20GHz — $ 454.5Intel Core i7-8700K @ 3.70GHz — $ 369.9Intel Core i7-875K @ 2.93GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-880 @ 3.07GHz — $ 583Intel Core i7-920 @ 2.67GHz — $ 174Intel Core i7-930 @ 2.80GHz — $ 60Intel Core i7-940 @ 2.93GHz — $ 70.7Intel Core i7-950 @ 3.07GHz — $ 245Intel Core i7-960 @ 3.20GHz — $ 100Intel Core i7-965 @ 3.20GHz — $ 140Intel Core i7-970 @ 3. 20GHz — $ 150Intel Core i7-9700 @ 3.00GHz — $ 330Intel Core i7-9700F @ 3.00GHz — $ 368Intel Core i7-9700K @ 3.60GHz — $ 410Intel Core i7-975 @ 3.33GHz — $ 180Intel Core i7-980 @ 3.33GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-980X @ 3.33GHz — $ 220Intel Core i7-990X @ 3.47GHz — $ 350Intel Core i9-10900K — $ 590Intel Core i9-11900K — $ 488Intel Core i9-12900K — $ 590Intel Core i9-7900X @ 3.30GHz — $ 1380Intel Core i9-7920X @ 2.90GHz — $ 1096.7Intel Core i9-7940X @ 3.10GHz — $ 1192.1Intel Core i9-7960X @ 2.80GHz — $ 2000Intel Core i9-7980XE @ 2.60GHz — $ 2005.5Intel Core i9-9900 @ 3.10GHz — $ 440Intel Core i9-9900K @ 3.60GHz — $ 835Intel Core2 Duo E4300 @ 1.80GHz — $ 158Intel Core2 Duo E4400 @ 2.00GHz — $ 9Intel Core2 Duo E4500 @ 2.20GHz — $ 40Intel Core2 Duo E4600 @ 2.40GHz — $ 158Intel Core2 Duo E4700 @ 2.60GHz — $ 100Intel Core2 Duo E6300 @ 1.86GHz — $ 13Intel Core2 Duo E6320 @ 1.86GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E6400 @ 2.13GHz — $ 20Intel Core2 Duo E6420 @ 2.13GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E6550 @ 2.33GHz — $ 15Intel Core2 Duo E6600 @ 2. 40GHz — $ 15Intel Core2 Duo E6700 @ 2.66GHz — $ 30Intel Core2 Duo E6750 @ 2.66GHz — $ 13Intel Core2 Duo E6850 @ 3.00GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E7200 @ 2.53GHz — $ 75Intel Core2 Duo E7300 @ 2.66GHz — $ 20Intel Core2 Duo E7400 @ 2.80GHz — $ 29Intel Core2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz — $ 15Intel Core2 Duo E7600 @ 3.06GHz — $ 120Intel Core2 Duo E8200 @ 2.66GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E8300 @ 2.83GHz — $ 20Intel Core2 Duo E8400 @ 3.00GHz — $ 9.8Intel Core2 Duo E8500 @ 3.16GHz — $ 40Intel Core2 Duo E8600 @ 3.33GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Extreme Q6800 @ 2.93GHz — $ 1125Intel Core2 Extreme Q6850 @ 3.00GHz — $ 1496Intel Core2 Extreme X6800 @ 2.93GHz — $ 263.6Intel Core2 Extreme X9650 @ 3.00GHz — $ 909Intel Core2 Extreme X9770 @ 3.20GHz — $ 1609Intel Core2 Extreme X9775 @ 3.20GHz — $ 1806Intel Core2 Quad Q6600 @ 2.40GHz — $ 40Intel Core2 Quad Q6700 @ 2.66GHz — $ 45Intel Core2 Quad Q8200 @ 2.33GHz — $ 23Intel Core2 Quad Q8300 @ 2.50GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Quad Q8400 @ 2.66GHz — $ 99.5Intel Core2 Quad Q9300 @ 2.50GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Quad Q9400 @ 2. 66GHz — $ 34Intel Core2 Quad Q9450 @ 2.66GHz — $ 335Intel Core2 Quad Q9500 @ 2.83GHz — $ 35Intel Core2 Quad Q9505 @ 2.83GHz — $ 190Intel Core2 Quad Q9550 @ 2.83GHz — $ 49Intel Core2 Quad Q9650 @ 3.00GHz — $ 69.8Intel Pentium G2010 @ 2.80GHz — $ 34.9Intel Pentium G2020 @ 2.90GHz — $ 32.9Intel Pentium G2030 @ 3.00GHz — $ 41Intel Pentium G2120 @ 3.10GHz — $ 46Intel Pentium G2130 @ 3.20GHz — $ 50Intel Pentium G2140 @ 3.30GHz — $ 50Intel Pentium G3220 @ 3.00GHz — $ 120Intel Pentium G3240 @ 3.10GHz — $ 80Intel Pentium G3250 @ 3.20GHz — $ 110Intel Pentium G3258 @ 3.20GHz — $ 178.3Intel Pentium G3260 @ 3.30GHz — $ 105Intel Pentium G3420 @ 3.20GHz — $ 110Intel Pentium G3430 @ 3.30GHz — $ 90Intel Pentium G3440 @ 3.30GHz — $ 159.9Intel Pentium G3450 @ 3.40GHz — $ 100Intel Pentium G3460 @ 3.50GHz — $ 288.2Intel Pentium G3470 @ 3.60GHz — $ 104.3Intel Pentium G4400 @ 3.30GHz — $ 80Intel Pentium G4500 @ 3.50GHz — $ 85.3Intel Pentium G4520 @ 3.60GHz — $ 110.9Intel Pentium G4560 @ 3.50GHz — $ 103.1Intel Pentium G4600 @ 3. 60GHz — $ 100Intel Pentium G4620 @ 3.70GHz — $ 105.9Intel Pentium G640 @ 2.80GHz — $ 25Intel Pentium G645 @ 2.90GHz — $ 95Intel Pentium G840 @ 2.80GHz — $ 35Intel Pentium G850 @ 2.90GHz — $ 30Intel Pentium G860 @ 3.00GHz — $ 30Intel Pentium G870 @ 3.10GHz — $ 97Intel Pentium Gold G5400 @ 3.70GHz — $ 123.9Intel Pentium Gold G5500 @ 3.80GHz — $ 100.3Intel Pentium Gold G5600 @ 3.90GHz — $ 100.9

    Versus Processor
    AMD Athlon 5000 Dual-Core — $ 100AMD Athlon 5200 Dual-Core — $ 30AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+ — $ 130AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4400+ — $ 60AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4600+ — $ 360AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4800+ — $ 460AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5000+ — $ 331.5AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5200+ — $ 53.1AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5400+ — $ 53AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5600+ — $ 150AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5800+ — $ 25AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6000+ — $ 46AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6400+ — $ 260AMD Athlon 7550 Dual-Core — $ 60AMD Athlon 7750 Dual-Core — $ 148.7AMD Athlon 7850 Dual-Core — $ 209. 7AMD Athlon Dual Core 5000B — $ 95AMD Athlon II X2 215 — $ 12AMD Athlon II X2 220 — $ 32.2AMD Athlon II X2 240 — $ 35AMD Athlon II X2 245 — $ 35AMD Athlon II X2 250 — $ 39AMD Athlon II X2 255 — $ 65.2AMD Athlon II X2 260 — $ 20AMD Athlon II X2 265 — $ 82.9AMD Athlon II X2 270 — $ 24AMD Athlon II X2 B22 — $ 36AMD Athlon II X2 B24 — $ 40AMD Athlon II X2 B28 — $ 49.1AMD Athlon II X3 425 — $ 104.2AMD Athlon II X3 435 — $ 50AMD Athlon II X3 440 — $ 47AMD Athlon II X3 445 — $ 91AMD Athlon II X3 450 — $ 40AMD Athlon II X3 455 — $ 116.9AMD Athlon II X3 460 — $ 50AMD Athlon II X4 620 — $ 60AMD Athlon II X4 630 — $ 43AMD Athlon II X4 631 Quad-Core — $ 80AMD Athlon II X4 635 — $ 70AMD Athlon II X4 640 — $ 80AMD Athlon II X4 641 Quad-Core — $ 91.5AMD Athlon II X4 645 — $ 50AMD Athlon X4 740 Quad Core — $ 277AMD Athlon X4 760K Quad Core — $ 46AMD Athlon X4 840 — $ 78.7AMD Athlon X4 845 — $ 50AMD Athlon X4 860K — $ 64AMD Athlon X4 870K — $ 80AMD Athlon X4 880K — $ 90AMD Athlon X4 950 — $ 60AMD E2-3200 APU — $ 8AMD FX-4100 Quad-Core — $ 130AMD FX-4130 Quad-Core — $ 76AMD FX-4170 Quad-Core — $ 100AMD FX-4200 Quad-Core — $ 228. 2AMD FX-4300 Quad-Core — $ 53.4AMD FX-4350 Quad-Core — $ 130AMD FX-6200 Six-Core — $ 340AMD FX-6300 Six-Core — $ 59AMD FX-6350 Six-Core — $ 130AMD FX-8120 Eight-Core — $ 100AMD FX-8150 Eight-Core — $ 383.5AMD FX-8300 Eight-Core — $ 80.6AMD FX-8320 Eight-Core — $ 79.5AMD FX-8320E Eight-Core — $ 98.9AMD FX-8350 Eight-Core — $ 80AMD FX-8370 Eight-Core — $ 135AMD FX-8370E Eight-Core — $ 180AMD FX-9370 Eight-Core — $ 178.9AMD FX-9590 Eight-Core — $ 122AMD Phenom 8250e Triple-Core — $ 47AMD Phenom 8450 Triple-Core — $ 30AMD Phenom 8600 Triple-Core — $ 53AMD Phenom 8600B Triple-Core — $ 53AMD Phenom 8650 Triple-Core — $ 50AMD Phenom 9100e Quad-Core — $ 40AMD Phenom 9150e Quad-Core — $ 40AMD Phenom 9350e Quad-Core — $ 3382.1AMD Phenom 9450e Quad-Core — $ 105AMD Phenom 9500 Quad-Core — $ 60AMD Phenom 9550 Quad-Core — $ 40AMD Phenom 9600 Quad-Core — $ 50AMD Phenom 9600B Quad-Core — $ 147.2AMD Phenom 9650 Quad-Core — $ 55AMD Phenom 9750 Quad-Core — $ 60AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core — $ 50AMD Phenom 9950 Quad-Core — $ 180AMD Phenom II X2 545 — $ 44AMD Phenom II X2 550 — $ 50AMD Phenom II X2 555 — $ 142. 1AMD Phenom II X2 565 — $ 30AMD Phenom II X2 B55 — $ 48AMD Phenom II X3 705e — $ 152.3AMD Phenom II X3 710 — $ 84.5AMD Phenom II X3 720 — $ 70AMD Phenom II X3 B73 — $ 75AMD Phenom II X4 805 — $ 174AMD Phenom II X4 810 — $ 116AMD Phenom II X4 820 — $ 75AMD Phenom II X4 840 — $ 90AMD Phenom II X4 905e — $ 212.4AMD Phenom II X4 910 — $ 100AMD Phenom II X4 910e — $ 157AMD Phenom II X4 920 — $ 67AMD Phenom II X4 925 — $ 160AMD Phenom II X4 940 — $ 120AMD Phenom II X4 945 — $ 50AMD Phenom II X4 955 — $ 130.2AMD Phenom II X4 960T — $ 135AMD Phenom II X4 965 — $ 59.5AMD Phenom II X4 B95 — $ 73AMD Phenom II X4 B97 — $ 90AMD Phenom II X6 1035T — $ 189AMD Phenom II X6 1045T — $ 175AMD Phenom II X6 1055T — $ 185AMD Phenom II X6 1075T — $ 260AMD Phenom II X6 1090T — $ 396.1AMD Phenom II X6 1100T — $ 200AMD Phenom X3 8550 — $ 170AMD Ryzen 3 1200 — $ 95AMD Ryzen 3 1300X — $ 125AMD Ryzen 3 2200G — $ 98AMD Ryzen 3 3100 — $ 90AMD Ryzen 3 3200G — $ 99AMD Ryzen 3 3300X — $ 120AMD Ryzen 5 1400 — $ 134AMD Ryzen 5 1500X — $ 144. 9AMD Ryzen 5 1600 — $ 155AMD Ryzen 5 1600X — $ 178.4AMD Ryzen 5 2400G — $ 159AMD Ryzen 5 2600 — $ 150AMD Ryzen 5 2600X — $ 210AMD Ryzen 5 3400G — $ 150AMD Ryzen 5 3500 — $ 148AMD Ryzen 5 3500X — $ 160.5AMD Ryzen 5 3600 — $ 199AMD Ryzen 5 3600X — $ 249AMD Ryzen 5 5500 — $ 160AMD Ryzen 5 5600X — $ 299AMD Ryzen 7 1700 — $ 190AMD Ryzen 7 1700X — $ 200AMD Ryzen 7 1800X — $ 250AMD Ryzen 7 2700 — $ 249.2AMD Ryzen 7 2700X — $ 305AMD Ryzen 7 3700X — $ 330AMD Ryzen 7 3800X — $ 399AMD Ryzen 7 5700X — $ 300AMD Ryzen 7 5800X — $ 399AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D — $ 450AMD Ryzen 9 3900X — $ 499AMD Ryzen 9 3950X — $ 750AMD Ryzen 9 5900X — $ 499AMD Ryzen 9 5950X — $ 710AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X — $ 350AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X — $ 420AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X — $ 680AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X — $ 900AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX — $ 1720Intel Core i3-10100 — $ 122Intel Core i3-10300 — $ 143Intel Core i3-11100 — $ 122Intel Core i3-11300 — $ 143Intel Core i3-12100 — $ 122Intel Core i3-12300 — $ 143Intel Core i3-2100 @ 3. 10GHz — $ 60Intel Core i3-2102 @ 3.10GHz — $ 58Intel Core i3-2105 @ 3.10GHz — $ 80Intel Core i3-2120 @ 3.30GHz — $ 30Intel Core i3-2125 @ 3.30GHz — $ 199Intel Core i3-2130 @ 3.40GHz — $ 70Intel Core i3-3210 @ 3.20GHz — $ 100Intel Core i3-3220 @ 3.30GHz — $ 34.9Intel Core i3-3225 @ 3.30GHz — $ 100Intel Core i3-3240 @ 3.40GHz — $ 46Intel Core i3-3245 @ 3.40GHz — $ 80Intel Core i3-3250 @ 3.50GHz — $ 95Intel Core i3-4130 @ 3.40GHz — $ 140Intel Core i3-4150 @ 3.50GHz — $ 260Intel Core i3-4160 @ 3.60GHz — $ 140Intel Core i3-4170 @ 3.70GHz — $ 150Intel Core i3-4330 @ 3.50GHz — $ 180Intel Core i3-4340 @ 3.60GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-4350 @ 3.60GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-4360 @ 3.70GHz — $ 280Intel Core i3-4370 @ 3.80GHz — $ 450Intel Core i3-530 @ 2.93GHz — $ 20Intel Core i3-540 @ 3.07GHz — $ 21Intel Core i3-550 @ 3.20GHz — $ 180Intel Core i3-560 @ 3.33GHz — $ 30Intel Core i3-6098P @ 3.60GHz — $ 133.7Intel Core i3-6100 @ 3.70GHz — $ 166.1Intel Core i3-6300 @ 3.80GHz — $ 143Intel Core i3-6320 @ 3.90GHz — $ 160Intel Core i3-7100 @ 3. 90GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-7300 @ 4.00GHz — $ 210Intel Core i3-7320 @ 4.10GHz — $ 174.8Intel Core i3-7350K @ 4.20GHz — $ 230Intel Core i3-8100 @ 3.60GHz — $ 130Intel Core i3-8300 @ 3.70GHz — $ 179.4Intel Core i3-8350K @ 4.00GHz — $ 184Intel Core i3-9100 @ 3.60GHz — $ 170Intel Core i3-9100F @ 3.60GHz — $ 105Intel Core i3-9320 @ 3.70GHz — $ 162Intel Core i3-9350KF @ 4.00GHz — $ 224Intel Core i5 750S @ 2.40GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-10400 — $ 182Intel Core i5-10600K — $ 236.8Intel Core i5-11400 — $ 182Intel Core i5-11600K — $ 262Intel Core i5-12400 — $ 143Intel Core i5-12600K — $ 290Intel Core i5-2300 @ 2.80GHz — $ 80Intel Core i5-2310 @ 2.90GHz — $ 80Intel Core i5-2320 @ 3.00GHz — $ 195.3Intel Core i5-2380P @ 3.10GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-2400 @ 3.10GHz — $ 84Intel Core i5-2400S @ 2.50GHz — $ 65.7Intel Core i5-2405S @ 2.50GHz — $ 164.4Intel Core i5-2450P @ 3.20GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-2500 @ 3.30GHz — $ 105Intel Core i5-2500K @ 3.30GHz — $ 124Intel Core i5-2500S @ 2.70GHz — $ 75Intel Core i5-2550K @ 3. 40GHz — $ 130Intel Core i5-3330 @ 3.00GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-3330S @ 2.70GHz — $ 95Intel Core i5-3340 @ 3.10GHz — $ 262Intel Core i5-3340S @ 2.80GHz — $ 150Intel Core i5-3350P @ 3.10GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-3450 @ 3.10GHz — $ 128Intel Core i5-3450S @ 2.80GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-3470 @ 3.20GHz — $ 125Intel Core i5-3470S @ 2.90GHz — $ 140.1Intel Core i5-3475S @ 2.90GHz — $ 143.5Intel Core i5-3550 @ 3.30GHz — $ 330Intel Core i5-3550S @ 3.00GHz — $ 341Intel Core i5-3570 @ 3.40GHz — $ 140Intel Core i5-3570K @ 3.40GHz — $ 144Intel Core i5-3570S @ 3.10GHz — $ 285Intel Core i5-4430 @ 3.00GHz — $ 180Intel Core i5-4430S @ 2.70GHz — $ 160Intel Core i5-4440 @ 3.10GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-4440S @ 2.80GHz — $ 463Intel Core i5-4460 @ 3.20GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-4460S @ 2.90GHz — $ 660Intel Core i5-4570 @ 3.20GHz — $ 175Intel Core i5-4570S @ 2.90GHz — $ 221.6Intel Core i5-4590 @ 3.30GHz — $ 185Intel Core i5-4590S @ 3.00GHz — $ 198Intel Core i5-4670 @ 3.40GHz — $ 188Intel Core i5-4670K @ 3.40GHz — $ 250Intel Core i5-4670R @ 3. 00GHz — $ 276Intel Core i5-4690 @ 3.50GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-4690K @ 3.50GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-4690S @ 3.20GHz — $ 269.9Intel Core i5-5675C @ 3.10GHz — $ 400Intel Core i5-6400 @ 2.70GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-6402P @ 2.80GHz — $ 190Intel Core i5-650 @ 3.20GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-6500 @ 3.20GHz — $ 234.4Intel Core i5-655K @ 3.20GHz — $ 60Intel Core i5-660 @ 3.33GHz — $ 49Intel Core i5-6600 @ 3.30GHz — $ 220Intel Core i5-6600K @ 3.50GHz — $ 288.9Intel Core i5-661 @ 3.33GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-670 @ 3.47GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-680 @ 3.60GHz — $ 90Intel Core i5-7400 @ 3.00GHz — $ 213.5Intel Core i5-750 @ 2.67GHz — $ 160.5Intel Core i5-7500 @ 3.40GHz — $ 210Intel Core i5-760 @ 2.80GHz — $ 100Intel Core i5-7600 @ 3.50GHz — $ 240Intel Core i5-7600K @ 3.80GHz — $ 251Intel Core i5-7640X @ 4.00GHz — $ 250Intel Core i5-8400 @ 2.80GHz — $ 200Intel Core i5-8500 @ 3.00GHz — $ 239Intel Core i5-8600 @ 3.10GHz — $ 244.5Intel Core i5-8600K @ 3.60GHz — $ 377.7Intel Core i5-9400 @ 2.90GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-9400F @ 2. 90GHz — $ 170Intel Core i5-9600K @ 3.70GHz — $ 280Intel Core i5-9600KF @ 3.70GHz — $ 215Intel Core i7-10700K — $ 409.1Intel Core i7-11700K — $ 410Intel Core i7-12700K — $ 470Intel Core i7-2600 @ 3.40GHz — $ 150Intel Core i7-2600K @ 3.40GHz — $ 198Intel Core i7-2600S @ 2.80GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-2700K @ 3.50GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-3770 @ 3.40GHz — $ 179Intel Core i7-3770K @ 3.50GHz — $ 249Intel Core i7-3770S @ 3.10GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-3820 @ 3.60GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-3930K @ 3.20GHz — $ 399Intel Core i7-3960X @ 3.30GHz — $ 800Intel Core i7-3970X @ 3.50GHz — $ 954Intel Core i7-4770 @ 3.40GHz — $ 240Intel Core i7-4770K @ 3.50GHz — $ 285Intel Core i7-4770S @ 3.10GHz — $ 250Intel Core i7-4771 @ 3.50GHz — $ 300Intel Core i7-4790 @ 3.60GHz — $ 279Intel Core i7-4790K @ 4.00GHz — $ 307Intel Core i7-4790S @ 3.20GHz — $ 342.6Intel Core i7-4820K @ 3.70GHz — $ 500Intel Core i7-4930K @ 3.40GHz — $ 399Intel Core i7-4960X @ 3.60GHz — $ 770Intel Core i7-5775C @ 3.30GHz — $ 450Intel Core i7-5820K @ 3. 30GHz — $ 300Intel Core i7-5930K @ 3.50GHz — $ 499Intel Core i7-5960X @ 3.00GHz — $ 770Intel Core i7-6700 @ 3.40GHz — $ 433.7Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00GHz — $ 335Intel Core i7-6800K @ 3.40GHz — $ 420Intel Core i7-6850K @ 3.60GHz — $ 550Intel Core i7-6900K @ 3.20GHz — $ 1200Intel Core i7-6950X @ 3.00GHz — $ 1576Intel Core i7-7700 @ 3.60GHz — $ 325.1Intel Core i7-7700K @ 4.20GHz — $ 355Intel Core i7-7740X @ 4.30GHz — $ 349Intel Core i7-7800X @ 3.50GHz — $ 370Intel Core i7-7820X @ 3.60GHz — $ 930Intel Core i7-8086K @ 4.00GHz — $ 553Intel Core i7-860 @ 2.80GHz — $ 290Intel Core i7-860S @ 2.53GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-870 @ 2.93GHz — $ 310Intel Core i7-8700 @ 3.20GHz — $ 454.5Intel Core i7-8700K @ 3.70GHz — $ 369.9Intel Core i7-875K @ 2.93GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-880 @ 3.07GHz — $ 583Intel Core i7-920 @ 2.67GHz — $ 174Intel Core i7-930 @ 2.80GHz — $ 60Intel Core i7-940 @ 2.93GHz — $ 70.7Intel Core i7-950 @ 3.07GHz — $ 245Intel Core i7-960 @ 3.20GHz — $ 100Intel Core i7-965 @ 3.20GHz — $ 140Intel Core i7-970 @ 3. 20GHz — $ 150Intel Core i7-9700 @ 3.00GHz — $ 330Intel Core i7-9700F @ 3.00GHz — $ 368Intel Core i7-9700K @ 3.60GHz — $ 410Intel Core i7-975 @ 3.33GHz — $ 180Intel Core i7-980 @ 3.33GHz — $ 200Intel Core i7-980X @ 3.33GHz — $ 220Intel Core i7-990X @ 3.47GHz — $ 350Intel Core i9-10900K — $ 590Intel Core i9-11900K — $ 488Intel Core i9-12900K — $ 590Intel Core i9-7900X @ 3.30GHz — $ 1380Intel Core i9-7920X @ 2.90GHz — $ 1096.7Intel Core i9-7940X @ 3.10GHz — $ 1192.1Intel Core i9-7960X @ 2.80GHz — $ 2000Intel Core i9-7980XE @ 2.60GHz — $ 2005.5Intel Core i9-9900 @ 3.10GHz — $ 440Intel Core i9-9900K @ 3.60GHz — $ 835Intel Core2 Duo E4300 @ 1.80GHz — $ 158Intel Core2 Duo E4400 @ 2.00GHz — $ 9Intel Core2 Duo E4500 @ 2.20GHz — $ 40Intel Core2 Duo E4600 @ 2.40GHz — $ 158Intel Core2 Duo E4700 @ 2.60GHz — $ 100Intel Core2 Duo E6300 @ 1.86GHz — $ 13Intel Core2 Duo E6320 @ 1.86GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E6400 @ 2.13GHz — $ 20Intel Core2 Duo E6420 @ 2.13GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E6550 @ 2.33GHz — $ 15Intel Core2 Duo E6600 @ 2. 40GHz — $ 15Intel Core2 Duo E6700 @ 2.66GHz — $ 30Intel Core2 Duo E6750 @ 2.66GHz — $ 13Intel Core2 Duo E6850 @ 3.00GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E7200 @ 2.53GHz — $ 75Intel Core2 Duo E7300 @ 2.66GHz — $ 20Intel Core2 Duo E7400 @ 2.80GHz — $ 29Intel Core2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz — $ 15Intel Core2 Duo E7600 @ 3.06GHz — $ 120Intel Core2 Duo E8200 @ 2.66GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Duo E8300 @ 2.83GHz — $ 20Intel Core2 Duo E8400 @ 3.00GHz — $ 9.8Intel Core2 Duo E8500 @ 3.16GHz — $ 40Intel Core2 Duo E8600 @ 3.33GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Extreme Q6800 @ 2.93GHz — $ 1125Intel Core2 Extreme Q6850 @ 3.00GHz — $ 1496Intel Core2 Extreme X6800 @ 2.93GHz — $ 263.6Intel Core2 Extreme X9650 @ 3.00GHz — $ 909Intel Core2 Extreme X9770 @ 3.20GHz — $ 1609Intel Core2 Extreme X9775 @ 3.20GHz — $ 1806Intel Core2 Quad Q6600 @ 2.40GHz — $ 40Intel Core2 Quad Q6700 @ 2.66GHz — $ 45Intel Core2 Quad Q8200 @ 2.33GHz — $ 23Intel Core2 Quad Q8300 @ 2.50GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Quad Q8400 @ 2.66GHz — $ 99.5Intel Core2 Quad Q9300 @ 2.50GHz — $ 50Intel Core2 Quad Q9400 @ 2. 66GHz — $ 34Intel Core2 Quad Q9450 @ 2.66GHz — $ 335Intel Core2 Quad Q9500 @ 2.83GHz — $ 35Intel Core2 Quad Q9505 @ 2.83GHz — $ 190Intel Core2 Quad Q9550 @ 2.83GHz — $ 49Intel Core2 Quad Q9650 @ 3.00GHz — $ 69.8Intel Pentium G2010 @ 2.80GHz — $ 34.9Intel Pentium G2020 @ 2.90GHz — $ 32.9Intel Pentium G2030 @ 3.00GHz — $ 41Intel Pentium G2120 @ 3.10GHz — $ 46Intel Pentium G2130 @ 3.20GHz — $ 50Intel Pentium G2140 @ 3.30GHz — $ 50Intel Pentium G3220 @ 3.00GHz — $ 120Intel Pentium G3240 @ 3.10GHz — $ 80Intel Pentium G3250 @ 3.20GHz — $ 110Intel Pentium G3258 @ 3.20GHz — $ 178.3Intel Pentium G3260 @ 3.30GHz — $ 105Intel Pentium G3420 @ 3.20GHz — $ 110Intel Pentium G3430 @ 3.30GHz — $ 90Intel Pentium G3440 @ 3.30GHz — $ 159.9Intel Pentium G3450 @ 3.40GHz — $ 100Intel Pentium G3460 @ 3.50GHz — $ 288.2Intel Pentium G3470 @ 3.60GHz — $ 104.3Intel Pentium G4400 @ 3.30GHz — $ 80Intel Pentium G4500 @ 3.50GHz — $ 85.3Intel Pentium G4520 @ 3.60GHz — $ 110.9Intel Pentium G4560 @ 3.50GHz — $ 103.1Intel Pentium G4600 @ 3. 60GHz — $ 100Intel Pentium G4620 @ 3.70GHz — $ 105.9Intel Pentium G640 @ 2.80GHz — $ 25Intel Pentium G645 @ 2.90GHz — $ 95Intel Pentium G840 @ 2.80GHz — $ 35Intel Pentium G850 @ 2.90GHz — $ 30Intel Pentium G860 @ 3.00GHz — $ 30Intel Pentium G870 @ 3.10GHz — $ 97Intel Pentium Gold G5400 @ 3.70GHz — $ 123.9Intel Pentium Gold G5500 @ 3.80GHz — $ 100.3Intel Pentium Gold G5600 @ 3.90GHz — $ 100.9

    CPU Performance Comparison

    The following lists the Passmark CPU performance scores of processors used in our products. They have been obtained either from our own tests or from http://www.cpubenchmark.net/

    The Passmark scores are averages from real users running «Performance Test» software on their systems and posting the results to the web site, enabling the comparison of the relative speeds of the different processors. Performance Test conducts eight different tests and then averages the results together to determine the CPU Mark rating for a system.

    All our recent scores are from Performance Test v10:
















    CPU           Technology              Max TDP  Product Family Passmark v10 CPU Mark
    i9 12900T B660i DDR5 4800 with UHD 770 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 45W Sigao 33386 
    i9 12900T B660i DDR5 4800 with UHD 770 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Sigao 27332
    i9 12900T B660i DDR5 4800 with T600 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Sigao 26969
    i9 12900T B660i DDR5 4800 with P620 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Sigao 26819
    i7 12700T B660i DDR5 4800 with UHD 770 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Sigao 25205
    i7 12700T B660i DDR5 4800 with P620 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Sigao 25161
    i7 12700T B660i DDR5 4800 with T600 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Sigao 24944
    i7 12700T H610T DDR4 3200 with UHD 770 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Astero 21915
    i9 11900T B560i DDR4 2666 with UHD 750 Graphics 11th Gen Rocket Lake 35W Sigao 21652
    Ryzen 7 5700U DDR4 3200 with Radeon Vega 7 Graphics AMD Lucienne Zen2 15W Turing NUC 20720
    i5 12500T H610T DDR4 3200 with UHD 770 Graphics 12th Gen Alder Lake 35W Astero 17204
    Ryzen 7 4700U DDR4 3200 with Radeon Vega 7 Graphics AMD Renoir Zen2 15W Turing NUC 16346
    i7 10700T h510T DDR4 2666 with UHD 630 Graphics 10th Gen Comet Lake 35W BLK Family 14153
    i5 10500T h510T DDR4 2666 with UHD 630 Graphics 10th Gen Comet Lake 35W BLK Family 11251

     

    All our old scores are from Performance Test v9. The latest version v10 has radically changed the algorithms used, meaning that you cannot make meaningful comparisons between scores obtained from v9 and v10. Please bear this in mind if comparing our scores with those above or on the Passmark website obtained from v10.


































































    CPU           Technology              Max TDP  Passmark v9 CPU Mark
    i9 10900T DDR4 2666 10th Gen Comet Lake 35W 19887
    i7 10700T DDR4 2666 10th Gen Comet Lake 35W 17552
    i9 9900T DDR4 3000 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh 35W 17228
    i7 9700T DDR4 3000 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh 35W (50W*1) 15226
    i7 8700T DDR4 3000 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W (50W*1) 14876
    i7 8700T DDR4 2666 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W (50W*1) 14661
    i7 10710U DDR4 2666 10th Gen Comet Lake 25W 13759
    i7 8559U DDR4 2400 8th Gen Coffee Lake-U 30W 13022
    i5 10400T DDR4 2666 10th Gen Comet Lake 35W 12948
    i7 8700T DDR4 2666 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 12814
    i5 8600T DDR4 2666 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 11772
    i5 9500T DDR4 2666 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh 35W 11464
    i5 8259U DDR4 2400 8th Gen Coffee Lake-U 28W 11264
    i5 8500T DDR4 2666 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 10954
    i5 9400T DDR4 2666 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh 35W 10649
    i7 7700T DDR4 3000 7th Gen Kaby Lake 35W 10408
    i5 8400T DDR4 2666 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 10279
    i7 6700T DDR4 3000 6th Gen Skylake 35W 10124
    i7 7700T DDR4 2133 7th Gen Kaby Lake 35W 9964
    i7 6700T DDR4 2400 6th Gen Skylake 35W 9827
    i7 4790S 4th Gen Haswell 65W 9629
    i7 6700T DDR3 6th Gen Skylake 35W 9418
    i7 4770S 4th Gen Haswell 65W 9347
    i7 4790T 4th Gen Haswell 45W 9245
    i7 3770S 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge 65W 9105
    i7 4785T 4th Gen Haswell 35W 8183
    i3 8300T DDR4 2400 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 7880
    i7 4765T 4th Gen Haswell 35W 7540
    i5 7500T 7th Gen Kaby Lake 35W 7485
    i3 8100T DDR4 2400 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 7424
    i5 4570S 4rd Gen Haswell 65W 7021
    i5 7400T 7th Gen Kaby Lake 35W 6887
    i5 6400 6th Gen Skylake 65W 6850
    i5 6500T DDR4 2400 6th Gen Skylake 35W 6340
    i5 6500T DDR3 6th Gen Skylake 35W 6280
    i5 7260U 7th Gen Kaby Lake 15W 5883
    i5 4590T 4rd Gen Haswell 35W 5843
    i5 6400T DDR4 6th Gen Skylake 35W 5657
    i3 6100 6th Gen Skylake 65W 5341
    i3 7100T 7th Gen Kaby Lake 35W 5289
    i5 7300U 7th Gen Kaby Lake 15W 5252
    i7 5557U 5th Gen Broadwell 28W 5235
    i3 6100T 6th Gen Skylake 35W 4944
    i5 3470T 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge 35W 4591
    Pentium Gold G5400T 8th Gen Coffee Lake 35W 4565
    i3 3225 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge 55W 4371
    i5 6260U 6th Gen Skylake 15W 4355
    i3 4130T 4th Gen Haswell 35W 4260
    i3 7100U 7th Gen Kaby Lake 15W 4076
    i5 3427U 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge 17W 3866
    i5 5250U 5th Gen Broadwell 15W 3855
    i5 3337U 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge 17W 3673
    i5 4250U 4th Gen Haswell 15W 3616
    i3 2100 2nd Gen Sandy Bridge 65W 3601
    i3 5010U 5th Gen Broadwell 15W 3278
    Pentium G3440T 4th Gen Haswell 35W 3241
    Pentium Silver J5005 8th Gen Gemini Lake 10W 3074
    i3 4010U 4th Gen Haswell 15W 2652
    i3 3217U 3rd Gen Ivy Bridge 17W 2624
    Celeron J3455 7th Gen Apollo Lake 10W 2125
    Pentium N3700 5th Gen Braswell 6W 2035
    Celeron N2820 4th Gen BayTrail-M 7. 5W 1100
    Celeron N3050 5th Gen Braswell 6W 1067
    Celeron 847   2nd Gen Sandy Bridge    17W 1023
     

    *1 — when used in many motherboards the i7 9700T/8700T does not have a 35W limit imposed by default, and our testing shows they are achieving their performance scores by using around 50W of power.

    Thermal Design Power (TDP) represents the near maximum power a product can draw for a thermally significant period while running commercially available software.

    Performance comparison of PCs and smartphones, including iPhone 11 / Sudo Null IT News

    After the release of the iPhone 11 with SoC Bionic A13, once again there was a desire to compare its performance with a PC. A couple of years ago, Apple’s chips already outperformed the mid-range notebook segment. And since there is practically no progress in performance, the new pocket gadget should now bypass the entire laptop fraternity and have a good bite on desktop systems.

    Bypassed in many ways. Bitten. Details under the cut.

    When looking at opinions about who is faster (smartphones or laptops), the most common option turned out to be: “how can a smartphone for 60 thousand be slower than a PC that is cheaper?” True, these opinions were not expressed on Habré. But technically savvy people, on the contrary, asked, they say, how can a baby with a TDP of 3-5 W get around monsters with a TDP of 65 W or more, despite the fact that they are produced according to similar technical processes?

    Two different camps formed. I myself, being a systems engineer in the first VO, belong to the second. And I have an answer to the question about watts. But let’s get to the heart of the matter.

    What ruler will measure

    We will compare performance in the Geekbench 5 cross-platform test, which emulates the work of real user tasks such as archiving and encryption. How legitimate it is to compare different platforms in it is a good question. Let’s take it a little lower. And now I’ll just say that the creators of the test are pushing hard on this:

    I use this test periodically. But the results for this post were taken from the official charts. In them, the creators put the average values ​​from what gets into the database from users. Most often, such results turn out to be slightly underestimated, because users are not professional testers. During the test, some software may be running in the background, or power saving mode is enabled. However, we don’t care. The extreme lower values ​​are already discarded there anyway. In addition, I do not have the goal of obtaining precision data. It is enough to outline a certain general picture.

    Test results

    First — Apple is cool, and over the past couple of years it has increased its lead over Qualcomm and Samsung with their licensed and finished armaments.

    Second, the performance of top smartphones in office-consumer tasks has caught up with advanced laptops and good office PCs (see caveats below).
    The third is single-core performance. It is she who is responsible for the responsiveness of the interface and the speed of applications, most of which are poorly adapted to parallelization.

    Who’s who on the chart

    Now let’s take a look at the interior of the test subjects. For convenience, I have collected everything in one plate.

    If we combine these data with the performance chart, we can see that the limited thermal package does not allow all cores of mobile chips to thresh to their fullest. Additional restrictions are introduced by the big.LITTLE architecture, within which it is not always possible to simultaneously operate a high-performance on-chip cluster and an energy-efficient one.

    Is it possible to compare different architectures?

    A full-fledged comparison of processor architectures is extremely difficult, and I have no idea how to do it competently. ARM belongs to the RISC type, and x86 belongs to the CISC. With fewer instructions and fewer blocks, the ARM chip must execute individual instructions faster and more energy-efficiently. But as soon as it comes to performing complex functions for which the x86 has prepared hardware blocks and instruction sets, ARM will smoke on the sidelines. But that’s in theory.

    And there are different operating systems, different compilers. And it seems to me that the developers of Geekbench slightly scored on all this, simplifying everything to monitoring the performance of some typical tasks by the system, such as decoding jpg or assembling cached web pages. At the same time, they tried to optimize the code of these tasks for each system separately.

    As a result, the happy owner of the latest iPhone can proudly say that his smart phone is able to open photos from the gallery as quickly as the top-end five-gig “stove” from Intel. But Geekbench no longer allows you to make more serious statements. However, for most everyday situations this is quite enough.

    More details on their tests can be found in this pdf.

    What are these comparisons for?

    Three years ago, I was struck by the idea that with the growth in performance of mobile chips, they could encroach on the segment of inexpensive netbooks, a third of the price of which, at times, is Microsoft’s OS. With Google distributing its OS for free and only $1 per device to add Google Play services and more, the idea of ​​capturing the lower segment looked quite realistic.

    However, Qualcomm’s marketers have gone the other way, and for the past couple of years they have been trying to surprise the world with $1000 systems in which their top chips get along with Windows 10…

    Links to charts

    If you are interested in the average results of other systems, you can use the Gikbench online database. Here are direct links to automatically updated charts for Android, iOS and PC. In the same place, you can enter any keywords in the search (models of chips, smartphones) and see the results obtained by other users for these devices. The only thing is that you will have to filter inadequate options yourself.

    and yes, the owners of top smartphones can be proud that they carry in their pocket a thing more powerful than most modern laptops. At least if we compare them in terms of work in everyday applications.

    How to evaluate the performance of the processor (CPU), at what frequency it works under load (testing)

    Hello.

    The same CPU model in different PCs and laptops can work with different frequency (and provide different performance). To find out the real performance and compare it with other CPUs (of the same model and others), you need to resort to special. tests…

    Actually, below I will give several options for such tests, which can be useful both for normal performance assessment and for diagnosing the system as a whole (for example, to test the cooling system, optimize power settings, etc. ).

    Warning: for objective results, close all resource-intensive applications (games, editors, torrents, etc.) before any tests.

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    👉 Note!

    If you know the model of your processor and want to compare it with another specific model, I recommend 👉 this note. Thanks to the spec. tables and ratings you can find out by what percentage (%) one CPU is faster than another …

    For a quick assessment (in Windows points) of all PC components in general, I recommend 👉 this material.

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    Article content

    • 1 Ways to see real CPU performance
      • 1.1 Option 1: AIDA 64 + HWMonitor (find temperature and real frequency)
      • 1.2 Option 2: CPU-Z (comparison with other CPUs)
      • 1.3 Option 3: CineBench (one more comparison)
      • 1.4 Option 4: view CPU usage in games
    • → Ask a question | add

    Option 1: AIDA 64 + HWMonitor (find out the temperature and real frequency)

    And so, the first option is suitable for checking at what frequency the processor is running under load (the promised 👉 Turbo boost does not always «reach» their maximums). It also checks voltage and temperature (all of these data together can help with diagnostics and optimization).

    For such a test, I recommend two utilities: AIDA 64 + HWMonitor (they can be downloaded 👉 here). You need to run them both at the same time.

    Next in AIDA 64 go to menu «Service» and click on «System stability test» .

    Service — stability test / AIDA 64

    After, in the same AIDA 64, check the box next to item «Stress CPU» and press the button «Start» . Then carefully observe the readings in HWMonitor — the frequency (Clocks) and temperature (Temperatures).

    Note: in my case (see screenshot below), I managed to find out that the CPU was running at 1694 Mhz (although it could potentially handle more than 3000 Mhz). As it turned out, the power settings were the culprit — after resetting them, the CPU became «faster»…

    The performance of the processor (and the computer as a whole) can be affected by power settings ! Make sure your Windows settings are set to max. there were no restrictions on performance and driver settings… CPU)

    CPU-Z (link to the official site) is a very small utility for viewing the characteristics of the CPU, RAM, motherboard, video card, etc. It also has a simple and fairly effective CPU test that will help not only find out the real performance of your «stone», but also compare it with other models…

    After downloading the utility, extract the archive and run the executable file. See screenshot below. 👇

    Extract and run CPU-Z

    its model, characteristics are displayed (note: the utility «does not know» some new CPU models and may not work with them correctly).

    Then go to the tab «Bench» and click on the button «Bench CPU» .

    Bench CPU / test start

    When the test is completed — in line «This Processor» you will see the value of your CPU (to evaluate it in relation to the newest CPUs at the moment — select one of the benchmarks in line «Reference» ).

    In my case, the CPU is about 2-2.5 times slower than the rather popular Intel i7-770K…

    Reference — compare with popular CPUs0003

    Option 3: CineBench (another comparison)

    CineBench (link to the official website) is a solid benchmark that allows you to quickly and fairly accurately determine the real performance of the processor and video card. For the test, three-dimensional scenes (pictures) are used, which must be calculated and «drawn».

    Note: the program is completely in English, no installation is required.

    *

    After downloading and running CineBench, you need to press a single button to start the test «Run» . 👇

    CineBench — start checking

    Next, you will begin to «draw» the picture. You just have to wait until all the black areas on the canvas are replaced…

    Drawing a picture

    When the test is completed, a table will be displayed in the menu on the left, in which your CPU is listed in orange. In general, everything is quite clear… 👇

    CineBench test results

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    0106 Option 4: Viewing CPU usage in games

    You can estimate CPU usage directly in one single game (note: they just often ask questions like: «What makes the game slow down, because of the CPU or video card?» ) .

    To do this, you need the FPS Monitor utility — it will show not only FPS, but also temperatures, CPU (each core), RAM, networks. Read more about this in the article linked below.

    👉 Help!

    Diagnostics. How to find out why the game slows down: because of the processor, video card or RAM.

    WOW / FPS Monitor Screenshot

    Please note that when the CPU is under heavy load and can no longer cope — you will notice red values ​​​​against certain cores.

    Max. load on the CPU core

    In general, thanks to this utility, you can quickly assess whether the CPU is coping with the game, and whether it slows down because of it. ..

    *

    I have everything on the sim for now … Additions are welcome!

    Have a good test!

    👋

    First publication: 24.10.2019

    Correction: 18.06.2021

    RSS (as read RSS)

    Useful software:

    • Video Montage
    • Great software for making your first videos (all step by step!).
      Even a beginner can make a video!

    • computer accelerator
    • Program for cleaning Windows from «garbage» (deletes temporary files, speeds up the system, optimizes the registry).

    Other entries:

    Processor performance comparison » How to install Windows 10

    Hello everyone! In my last article, I compared AMD and Intel processors and referred to the http://cpu.userbenchmark.com service. Since the site is foreign and everything on it is written in English, I decided to write detailed instructions for using this very informative resource. The site itself is a huge database regarding the performance of various components (from SSD to video cards and processors). The results are based on tests by real owners of the specific hardware. I myself very often turn to this Internet resource because of its uniqueness. If you know of other similar resources, please write about it in the comments.

    In general, the site has a lot of functionality, ranging from ratings to testing your PC specifically, but our main goal for today is to learn how to compare hardware.

    To do this, find the inscription «Compare» in the upper right corner of the page and click on it. On the left side you can see a small box where you can choose what we want to compare (by default, processors are selected).0003

    CPU (central processing unit) — processors, GPU (graphics processing unit) — video cards, SSD (solid-state drive) solid-state drives, HDD (hard disk drive) — hard drives, RAM (random access memory) — random access memory, USB (universal serial bus) — well-known flash drives.

    Since my previous article was related specifically to processors, I will focus on them. The instruction for comparing other components is carried out in the same way, by analogy.

    Now we need to select two specific models from a huge list of processors. To do this, enter the name of the processor in the appropriate field, and press Enter. By the way, in this field you can see what place the percent takes in the overall performance rating.

    Today I will compare the now very popular Intel i5 6400 and the famous AMD FX-8320 .

    So, let’s figure out where to look and what to pay attention to.

    To the right and left of each model is a rating based on user votes. In my opinion, it is useless, so we will not focus on it, there are other much more important parameters.

    At the bottom of each model we see a brief description, namely: the price (which, by the way, I advise you not to look at all, because the site is foreign and the prices there differ from ours), the number of processor cores and threads, operating frequency, name family (Skylake and Piledriver) to which this stone belongs, year of manufacture and modification (6500, 6600, 6600K and 8320E, 8350, 8370, 8370E).

    We have read it, let’s move on and next in line is the field, which is located a little lower and displays the total advantage of one processor over the other in terms of speed as a percentage. It is important to understand that speed is not the same as performance. Understanding the difference is quite difficult. But here is a translation of the definition from the same site. Processor speed is a gaming-oriented value that reflects the performance at which a single-core load, as opposed to a multi-core one, is prioritized.

    As you can see, the i5 6400 is 34% faster than the 8320. But do not rush to conclusions and do not rush to close the article, the site has more detailed and, in my opinion, the most important information about performance, but first things first.

    In the same field, we can see how each percentage is suitable for a specific type of computer. Gaming — gaming (specialize mainly in parallel load on 4 processor cores and are used for 3D games), Desktop — office (specialize in a stable load on one core and are used for Internet surfing and office applications) and Workstation — professional (specialize in multi-core load and designed for heavy work with video and audio). For those who are interested in a detailed calculation formula for each type of PC, I leave a link

    Here you can also see how many users tested a particular component. And you can also see the place in the overall performance rating.

    We go down below and see the most important field, which displays the total efficiency of one processor in front of another, as well as separately for single-core, quad-core and multi-core loads.

    As we can see, in general, the i5 6400 is 20% more productive, and better copes with the load on one and four cores. However, the FX-8320 performs 18% better in multi-core processing. For example, video rendering FX will do better than i5. As I said, this is the most important information, but if we go down even lower, we will see the same field, only displaying performance during overclocking.

    How much you should trust this information is up to you, but personally I am skeptical about these figures, because overclocking is a purely individual matter and depends on a huge number of factors. Even lower, there are fields with various additional information, as well as additional characteristics and specifications.

    Well, that’s all, now you can compare processors (and not only), you know what you should pay attention to, and you can easily choose the best model for your needs! Bye everyone!

    I am sure you will be interested to read:

    1. Comparison of the latest and most purchased processors for gamers Intel Core i5-8400 and AMD Ryzen 5 1600
    2. How to compare processors at http://www.passmark.com

    5 sites to compare processor speed and performance from test reports

    Everyone would like their PC or laptop to run faster, and the obvious solution would be to go out and buy a new machine or upgrade the components of the computer you currently own. There are many hardware components that can improve the performance of a computer, such as an SSD, more or more memory, or a CPU. Since the processor is the central brain of the computer, it makes sense that an upgraded processor would help improve performance across the board.

    Processor Speed ​​Comparison (Intel and AMD)

    Many games will run faster, video and audio encoding will take less time, Windows will generally run faster, and resource intensive tasks will run faster. The problem with buying or researching a CPU is that there are hundreds of products like Intel and AMD being sold at the same time, and thousands have been released over the past few decades. This causes problems because it becomes more and more difficult to find the right processor that offers the best value or performance that you are looking for.

    A simple solution is to use a website that displays CPU performance and allows you to compare directly between different chips like your current CPU and another CPU so it’s much easier to see what benefits you can get. Here we have 5 websites that display CPU benchmark results and allow direct comparisons between processors.
    1. PassMark Benchmark Charts

    Apart from the Futuremark packages, Passmark is probably the other most notable benchmarking software. The scores are based on their own set of benchmarks, and there are several charts based on high/mid/low end, cost, individual threads, socket types, and performance by power. There are also other charts for graphics cards, hard drives, RAM, and mobile devices.

    The Mega List is useful for sorting by socket type or for getting quick information about clock speed, while the searchable Model List is a complete list of all CPU metrics where you can easily sort them by rank, score, value, or alphabetical order. The model list is also a page that allows you to compare up to three different processors. Simply search for a CPU in the list, or enter part of the model name in the search box, hover your mouse over its entry in the list, and click Compare. Then click the «Compare» button in the box on the right if you have up to three.

    The comparison page will display some basic information for each selected processor, as well as a Passmark benchmark score on the top graph, and each processor’s relative value based on its price and performance on the bottom. Clicking on the model name in the main list will take you to more attractive High, Mid and Low charts with the selected CPU highlighted in red.

    2. CPU World Benchmarks

    If you want the specs of just about any processor for decades, then CPU World is the place to visit. The Desktop CPU Benchmarks page lets you view scores for a single processor, compare two or more chips, or even a range of chips with just a few clicks.

    After selecting the manufacturer from the drop-down list, you can select the family type (Celeron/Core i7, etc.) or connector type (939/1155/775, etc.). You can then select a specific processor by model name or part name. Clicking the «Add to Selected» button on the right will add a single chip to the list, or an entire range from a family or socket type. Once all required processors have been added to the list, click Show Control Chart.

    The results page will give a number of different results based on the selected test. These have been modified from the dropdown to include results for 3DMark, 7-Zip, Cinebench, FLAC encoding, h364 encoding, Crystalmark, PCMark, WinRAR, Sandra, Superpi, and wPrime. Clicking on a processor model in the results will take you to the full details page, or the orange question mark on the right will open a brief information popup. The list of available processors does not include some of the latest from Intel or AMD.

    3. AnandTech Benchmarks

    AnandTech is a well known and respected hardware news and review site that has been around since the 1990s. The AnandTech benchmark pages contain a range of results for various types of hardware, including SSDs, graphics cards, laptops, tablets, and CPU coolers in addition to CPUs.

    Results can be viewed in one of three ways: either view the full list of processors for each test result, list scores for an individual processor, or compare two different processors in the same result set. To view the results of all chips scored in a single test, select a category under Processor Performance Overview, and then select an individual test to display the results. Individual benchmarks will change depending on whether you select a game, application workloads, or SYSMark scores in the drop-down category.

    To get all ratings for a single processor, simply select a chip from the «Select Your First Product» drop-down list and click the «View Single Product» button. To add a second CPU to compare with the first, enter it in the Second Product drop-down list and click Show Comparison. Somewhere in the region of 250 different processors are available for viewing or comparison from AMD and Intel, including the latest Skylake chips.

    4. HWBOT Comparisons

    HWBOT is an overclocking enthusiast site. They even have leagues, competitions and world record tables for the most extreme tweakers. There is also a page dedicated to comparing processor benchmark results across a range of benchmarks, as well as the base specification of each selected processor.

    By default, the HWBOT comparison table lists and selects a number of popular high performance CPUs such as i7 and i5. Uncheck each of these if you don’t want them to be compared. If the CPU you want to view is not listed, enter a few characters of its model name in the search field and click on the search result to add the chip to the list. This immediately displays the CPU spec at the top and adds it to the benchmark table at the bottom.

    The test chart displays scores for all the processors you have selected. There are a number of benchmarks to compare, including PiFast, SuperPi, PCMark, Cinebench, WinRAR, Geekbench, and HWBOT’s own benchmark suite. Just check or uncheck what you want to view and the results will instantly update. One thing we’re not sure about is whether these scores include overclocked results or results based only on stock speeds.

    5. CPUBoss

    CPUBoss is a website dedicated to benchmarking a wide range of CPUs over 15 years ago. In addition to the specifications, there are a number of other useful information such as internal and external reviews, technical differences between compared chips, user comments, and test results. There are also companion sites SSDBoss and GPUBoss.

    You can get all the information in one of two ways: for a single CPU just enter all or part of your model name in the search field, this will show everything the site has for that CPU. To compare two CPUs, enter all or part of the model names in each field and click the Compare button, this shows a direct comparison for comparison.

    In addition to the CPUBoss review which is based on overall performance, overclocking and performance scores, there are also results from third parties such as 3DMark, Geekbench, Cinebench, Passmark, Sysmark and X.264. Please note that the number of test scores will vary depending on which processors are being compared, as both must be tested to show a score, so only showing two or three scores is not uncommon for processors of different generations.

    Notes: Apparently there are other websites that offer a similar service like the ones we didn’t list above, they include Tom hardware performance charts and Userbenchmark. com.

    Processor speed comparison (Intel and AMD)

    How to compare processors and choose the best one

    How to compare and choose the best price / performance processor for gaming computer, video editing and design.

    Most users who build a new computer or want to upgrade an old one are faced with the problem of choosing a processor. This is mainly due to budget constraints and a lack of understanding of what this or that stone is capable of.

    Many people are tormented by questions — is it worth buying a more expensive processor with a large number of cores, is there any sense in an even higher frequency, is multithreading needed, is it possible to save money and buy a cheaper model, or do you still need a more powerful CPU …

    All these questions come down to one thing — will the processor cope with my tasks, how long will it last and how to find out which processor will be optimal for me so as not to overpay extra money.

    We already have a large detailed article on the site on how to choose a processor, it describes in detail all the technical parameters and here we will not repeat ourselves, but will focus only on comparing processors and give recommendations on choosing for certain tasks.

    Contents

    Contents

    • 1. What affects performance
    • 2. Direct comparison of processors
      • 2.1. Calculation principle and examples
      • 2.2. Features of processors Intel
      • 2.3. Features of processors AMD
      • 2.4. CPU Comparison Tables
    • 3. Benchmark Comparison
    • 4. Gaming CPU
    • 5. Video Editing CPU
    • 6. Design CPU
    • 7. Links

    1. What affects performance

    The number of cores affects the performance of the processor the most, then the presence of multithreading, then the frequency and, last but not least, the size of the cache, but its impact is so insignificant (about 5%) that it can be ignored.

    It should also be taken into account that the performance per core of Intel processors is higher than that of AMD. Also, the performance per core increases with each new generation of processors.

    2. Direct comparison of processors

    Directly without any tests, you can only compare processors of the same manufacturer and of the same generation, but it is very simple and fast. For example, you can compare the ninth series Intel Core i3-9100, i3-9300, i3-9350K, i5-9400, i5-9500, i5-9600K, i7-9700, i7-9700K, i9-9900 and i9-9900K processors.
    Processor Intel Core i5 Coffee Lake Refresh

    The difference in price can then be calculated to determine if the purchase is worthwhile. First I will give examples without and taking into account multithreading, and then I will give a link to automatic processor comparison tables.

    2.1. Calculation principle and examples

    For example, let’s compare two similar six-core processors i5-9400 (2. 9-4.1 GHz) and i5-9500 (3-4.4 GHz). The maximum frequency is the frequency in Boost mode (auto-overclocking), at which the processor will actually work at maximum load, so we will calculate by it.

    i5-9400 – 6×4.1=24.6
    i5-9500 – 6×4.4=26.4
    difference – (26.4-24.6)/26.4×100=7.3%

    9400 by about 7.3% and this is not so much to overpay for it, hardly anyone will notice the difference. But, if the budget allows, why not? Let’s talk about price now.

    We follow a simple logic — if the processor is 7.3% more powerful, then it should cost 7.3% more. If so, or the processor costs even less than 7.3% more, then this will be a bargain. But if it is 15% more expensive, then the increase in price is already twice as much as the increase in performance and it is not advisable to overpay for it.

    That’s sorted out, now let’s talk about how to compare processors with different numbers of cores/threads? If both processors are not multi-threaded (for example, 6/6 and 8/8), then everything is simple — we calculate according to the same scheme, compare performance and then prices in percentage terms.

    If both processors are multi-threaded (for example, 4/8 and 6/12), then everything is also simple here — count only by the number of cores, as in the previous cases (if you count by threads, the result will be the same).

    But if one processor is multi-threaded and the other is not, then everything is somewhat more complicated. The fact is that multithreading somewhere gives a big increase (for example, in video editing), but somewhere it gives very little (for example, in games). The increase can be from 0 to 100%, but usually it is something closer to 50%, which is confirmed by the results of various tests.

    Thus, a 4/8 processor will be very close to a 6/6 processor, while the former can perform better in video editing, and the latter will at least be no worse in games. Those. for video editing, the number of threads is more important, and for games of physical cores.

    But let’s get back to our calculations, when comparing single-threaded and multi-threaded processors, I suggest using the actual number of cores and a correction factor of 1. 5 for multi-threaded processors, since due to multi-threading each core can be considered 50% more powerful.

    For example, let’s compare the i7-9700 (8/8, 3-4.7 GHz) and the i9-9900 (8/16, 3.1-5 GHz).

    i7-9700 – 8×4.7=37.6
    i9-9900 – 8x5x1.5=60
    difference – (60-37.6)/60×100=37.3% than the i7-9700, about as much more it should cost. If the price difference is lower (15-25%), then its acquisition will be even more profitable, if it is higher (50% or more), then it is less advisable. But again, keep in mind that in games there will be no such difference in performance and buying i9 for them-9900 will not be justified, this processor will reveal itself well in professional video editing.

    2.2. Features of Intel

    processors i9-10900K. By the way, all of them are already multi-threaded.
    Processor Intel Core i3 Comet Lake

    Intel processors with the “K” index can be overclocked (only on motherboards with Z-chipsets) and if you plan to do this, then they can be evaluated by stable overclocking frequency from the test results on technical portals .

    If there is an “F” at the end of the marking, this means that the video core is disabled in this processor (culling) and therefore it costs a little less. I usually do not recommend buying such processors, because in case of problems with the video card, you will not be able to use the computer.

    2.3. Features of AMD

    processors As for AMD processors, they can also be compared — the first series with the first, the second with the second, the third with the third, etc. For example, you can compare processors of the third series Ryzen 3 3100, 3 3300X, 5 3600, 5 3600X, 7 3700X, 7 3800X, 93900X, 9 3950X.
    Processor AMD Ryzen 5 Matisse

    There are also models with the “XT” index, the frequency of which in the Boost mode (auto-overclocking) is slightly higher (only by 100-200 MHz) than the analogs with the “X” index, which does not give a noticeable increase in performance. By the way, all AMD processors can be overclocked, increasing their performance a little more.

    AMD’s main line of high performance Ryzen processors do not have an integrated graphics core, requiring a graphics card. However, there are processors with the «G» index (2200G, 2400G, 3200G, 3400G), which have integrated video, but are weaker than their older counterparts (fewer cores). They are suitable for multimedia PC (video, music) and simple undemanding games (maximum CS:GO, Dota).

    2.4. Processor Comparison Tables

    In order to easily and easily compare different processor models of both Intel and AMD in terms of performance and price, I made tables with current processor models.

    But you can substitute your own data in them to compare any processors of one line.

    You can download all processor comparison tables in the «Links» section.

    3. Comparison using tests

    If you want to determine whether a particular processor will cope with your tasks or compare processors from different manufacturers or from different series, then real tests that can be found on the Internet will help you with this.

    These tests are conducted by serious technical portals and can be found with a simple search like («i5-9600K vs i7-9700» or «i7-9700k vs ryzen 7 3700x»). On YouTube you will find many comparisons of processor performance in games, which is important for getting high FPS with a powerful enough graphics card. And about choosing a processor for video editing or designing, it is better to consult on a specialized forum of programs in which you plan to work.

    4. Game processor

    I have already said above that games do not really need multithreading, it is better to give preference to the number of physical cores. He also said that processor tests in games can be found on YouTube so that with a sufficiently powerful video card, performance does not rest on the processor.

    Here I will add that so far Intel processors perform better in games, since they have higher performance per core, which is important for games that do not know how to use multithreading well enough. The best choice here would be an 8-core Core i7 or i5 processor, at least 6 cores, since 4 cores for games today are already too few. But the frequency is quite enough 4 GHz, but if it is higher, it will not be worse, look at your financial capabilities.
    Processor Intel Core i5 Comet Lake

    Do not forget that the video card is very important for games, so invest in it to the maximum, and already choose the processor according to the residual principle — if enough for an 8-core, then great, if not, take it 6-core, everything will be fine. In a pinch, for an entry-level gaming PC, even a multi-threaded i3 (4/8) will suffice. It makes sense to take more powerful multi-threaded Intel processors (6/12, 8/16) if, in addition to games, you are also fond of video editing.

    5. Processor for video editing

    For video editing and final rendering (publishing a project), the main thing is the number of threads. And here, AMD’s Ryzen processors are unrivaled, anyone can afford an 8/16 or more model. As an option, at least with a very limited budget, you can even take 6/12. In any case, you will get a very favorable price/performance ratio.
    Processor AMD Ryzen 7 Matisse

    If, in addition to video editing, you also want to play games, then Ryzen processors will be worse in this regard, since their FPS is lower than with Intel. A model with a higher frequency will help improve the situation, as well as overclocking and faster memory. But, if you want to get the most out of both games and video editing, then it’s better to get an Intel processor starting from the tenth generation, they are all multi-threaded, but they cost more than their counterparts from AMD.

    At the same time, do not forget that for comfortable rendering of effects in real time (in preview during editing) and rendering of the project at the output, you need a gaming video card of an average or at least an initial class. It speeds up rendering by an order of magnitude, and without it it is simply unthinkable to engage in even amateur video editing. Well, for games — the more powerful the video card, the better. Consider this when choosing a processor so that your budget is also enough for a video card.

    6. Engineering Processor

    Complex design is completely different. Here an important link is a video card to accelerate the rendering (scrolling) of 3D models in real time. Without it, it will be very tight and a budget gaming model is indispensable here, you will have to invest in something professional from the Quadro or FirePro series (about $ 1000 and more). Be sure to read the system requirements for your CAD suite and the user tips on the forum.

    From the remaining budget, first select the minimum of everything else, including the required amount of RAM, and invest the rest in the processor. It would be best to save money here and take a multi-threaded Ryzen 8/16 or even 6/12, this will certainly be enough.
    Processor AMD Ryzen 5 Matisse

    You still won’t be able to play games on a professional video card, it is absolutely not suitable for this and will not provide a comfortable frame rate. But there are several ways out — a separate PC for games (if you are wealthy enough), a game console (complete decoupling from the PC) or installing a second gaming video card (preferably from the same developer as the professional one). In the latter case, make sure your application allows you to select the graphics card you want to use for acceleration.

    Ideally, if you can use a gaming video card for work as well, so as not to buy a professional one, so take this issue seriously and find out everything about your software well, it is better to consult with the support service.

    If it turns out that the gaming video card is enough for you, then you can think about the processor. If the budget allows, then you can take something from Intel (6-8 cores) to achieve maximum FPS in games.

    Click the link below to download performance and price comparison charts of current processors from Intel and AMD to help you make your choice.

    If you liked the article, please support our site and share a link to it in social networks

    To avoid serious damage to the computer, you need to sometimes check its components for operability. This is especially true for the «brain» of a PC — its processor. Special programs for Windows with built-in tests and useful tools help to perform CPU testing.

    CPU-Z

    CPU-Z is a well-known program that allows you to check the processor on your computer, determine its temperature, load and performance. In the utility, you can view the size of the CPU cache, conduct a processor stress test and compare the current component with other models from the catalog.

    Open the «Bench» section in the main window of the CPU-Z utility and click the «Bench CPU» button to start the CPU test process.

    You can also run a chipset stress test to determine the device’s performance under load. The obtained data can be confirmed and compared with other processor models from Intel and AMD.

    The CPU-Z utility has the following advantages:

    • view processor cache information;
    • CPU stress test device;
    • processor health check;
    • display information about the motherboard and video card;
    • comparison of processor test results with other CPU models.

    Software deficiencies:

    • Cannot start checking a single processor core;
    • It is not possible to connect additional extensions to test the CPU.

    The CPU-Z program is free, the interface language is English.

    Download CPU-Z

    SiSoftware Sandra

    SiSoftware Sandra is a program with which you can check the performance and health of the processor, video card, hard drive and motherboard. Through the utility, you can view detailed information about the configuration of the computer, there is a useful tool for testing system stability and checking portable devices.

    In the SiSoftware Sandra application, go to the Benchmarks tab. In the «Processor» section, select the «Overall Processor Score» option, this is a general chipset test tool.

    There is also an image processing speed test, power efficiency test and arithmetic test. Upon completion of testing, the utility will provide a detailed test report, the results can be saved in a separate file.

    SiSoftware Sandra has the following advantages:

    • large selection of benchmarks for computer components;
    • work with portable devices;
    • saving the results of the processor test in a separate file;
    • system stability testing;
    • Enable/disable additional modules in settings.

    Weaknesses of the program:

    • cannot perform a processor stress test;
    • There is no function to compare CPU test results with other models.

    SiSoftware Sandra is free, the interface is translated into Russian.

    Download SiSoftware Sandra

    BurnInTest

    BurnInTest is a useful utility that allows you to check the processor and other computer components. The program has a tool for monitoring the current temperature of devices and the ability to view detailed information about the system. To test the CPU, you can connect additional extensions in the settings.

    Add the processor to the list of devices to check (all available parts are located at the bottom of the «Dashboard» interface).

    After adding the chipset to the list, press the «GO» button. After that, the BurnInTest program will begin a full processor performance test.

    The main advantages of the BurnInTest program:

    • the ability to test each processor core separately;
    • monitoring the temperature of computer components in real time;
    • connection of additional extensions for testing;
    • saving test results in a separate file;
    • collection of detailed information about the system;
    • Action selection during device test error detection.

    Disadvantages of the utility:

    • test results cannot be compared with other processor models.

    The BurnInTest utility has been translated into Russian. The license price is $80, but there is a free trial version with limited functionality.

    Download BurnInTest

    CINEBENCH

    Cinebench is a tool for evaluating processor performance and overall health. The performance test results obtained can be compared with other CPU models. The utility works with all popular models of processors from Intel and AMD.

    To start the chipset test, press the «Run» button (located in the «CPU» line). The program will begin testing and verifying the health of the processor by rendering the image. The final score depends on the speed of information processing by the processor.

    The final result of the processor test will be displayed in the «Ranking» section (marked in orange in the list). If necessary, you can see the details of testing.

    Main benefits of Cinebench utility:

    • CPU performance test by rendering;
    • comparison of test results with other CPU models;
    • the ability to save the best test results;
    • start testing the video card and processor at the same time;
    • advanced test settings for testing a single processor core;
    • View CPU test details.

    Weaknesses of the program:

    • device stress test cannot be performed;
    • it is not possible to view the temperature and current processor load;
    • Missing CPU cache information.

    The Cinebench utility can be downloaded for free, the interface language is English.

    Download Cinebench

    Geekbench

    Geekbench is a benchmark for testing the performance of a computer and its components, including a processor, video card, motherboard and other devices. In the application, you can choose the architecture for testing (32 or 64 bits).

    Select the «Run CPU Benchmark» tool in the main Geekbench window. This function is used to check the performance of the processor.

    The test result will open in the browser — on the official website of the application. As a result, the points that the processor scored during the test will be shown.

    The main benefits of Geekbench:

    • quick processor performance test;
    • collection of system information;
    • select architecture for testing.