Corsair memory quality: Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM Review

Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM Review

Today, we are offering you our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review. This is where we’ll discuss the product and focus on its features, specifications, functions, performance, and more. 

What we have for our review is the 32GB RAM, 3,600MHz version. And, we’ll see if it’s just as good as what Corsair claims. For starters, we can see that the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM has a fresh and sleek design.  And it’s also enclosed in an aluminium cover which adds more to its premium aesthetics. 

Think this is something you’d need for your system? If that’s the case, continue reading our review to learn more about it. 

Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM Packaging

We’re beginning our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review by checking out its packaging and contents. 

When it arrived, the product came in your typical Corsair Vengeance-looking box that sports a simple black theme. In front, it features an image of the DDR4 RAM while Corsair and its logo are on the upper-left corner.  

You’ll see the name of the product below the image, as well as what it is. The front also notes that the product is optimised to work with Ryzen, and is compatible with iCUE software. 

Looking at the back of the package, you’ll find more details about the DDR4 RAM. These include information like its compatibility with ASUS and MSI boards, sync software, and some key features.

Corsair even covered the 10-one dynamic RGBs, and panoramic light pipe style. They also noted that it features a dual-tone heat spreader and it’s optimised for AMD. 

We appreciate that there are a pair of spaces that let us see the product stickers on the sticks. Why? It’s because all technical information is present there. 

There’s even a little notation present that informs us what kit we have. And with that, we have a total of four sticks with 8GB memory for each. 

On the bottom-left corner of this area, you’ll find the legalese while the opposite corner is a sticker. The latter verifies if you received the right kit you need; cross-checking its model number is provided here.

To complete this section of our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review, we checked out the box’s contents. Inside, you’ll find a clamshell package to protect and safeguard the four sticks while in transit. The documents included are the safety guide, while the other shows you how to install the product.

The last thing you’ll find inside the package is a QR code that brings you to Corsair’s product page. 

Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM Review – Design and Functionality

The design of these sticks greatly differ from the Vengeance Pro SL, and it’s optimised for both Intel and AMD. Also, Corsair obviously went over the top with this DDR4 RAM’s design. 

They utilised a few angles at the top of the sticks. They opted for those that are present on the brushed aluminium sections. Then, these are matched with the angles present on the Vengeance sticker that’s set on each stick. 

Details about the heat spreaders are important for users. So we’ve included it in our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review. 

It’s a functional element with thermal pads underneath. These touch the flash memory modules to relay heat to its aluminium surface. Don’t expect to find fins for increased heat transfers since the DDR4 in this variant doesn’t necessarily need it. 

The aluminium heat spreaders get anodised in the colourway, blending nicely with the gunmetal gray with a brushed finish. This is between a more matte black shade that displays the expected little triangles. 

Vengeance is written in the centre on one side, plus certification details on the other. 

The lower section of the heat spreaders is black, and features a triangular form on the packaging. The black PCB is a must for this design. And compared to other sticks, the light pipe on top is thin and can be seen from any angle possible. 

From a distance, the light pipes appear marked with the logo of the company, and are positioned in the middle. This is technically enough in most designs, but there’s more to see here.  

When looking closely, you’ll find the same triangular pattern that you’ll see everywhere else. You can do this by shifting the angle and looking closer at the RAM. 

Overall, we love how simple the aesthetics of the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM is. And as you get closer and look at it more intently, you’ll see that there’s more to the simple design. 

The combination of the brushed aluminium, patterns, and thin light bar is a great way to go for this product. Next in our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review, we’ll focus on the key features. And, we’ll see what the DDR4 RAM has in store for us.

Key Features of the Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM 

Spectacular Ten-zone Lighting

The Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM features dynamic ten-zone RGB lighting that are individually addressable. These LEDs are encased in a panoramic light pipe, offering unobstructed viewing from every angle.

Designed for Ryzen

This memory kit is optimised for tight response times and maximum bandwidth on the newest AMD DDR4 motherboards. With that, it will definitely complement your Ryzen system.

Synchronise and Unite

With Corsair’s iCUE Software, you can control and synchronise this memory kit with your other Corsair RGB products. You can choose from a list of preset lighting profiles or create your own.

High-Speed Performance of the Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM 

The Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM only uses tightly-screened memory chips for longer overclocking potential. It even has a custom-performance PCB that offers the highest signal quality for excellent stability and performance.

Instant Overclocking

The Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM automatically configures to the maximum speed supported by your system. With that, you can multitask and experience faster load times without tweaking via BIOS.

Lifetime Warranty

You can enjoy complete peace of mind since the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM comes with a lifetime warranty. It even delivers worry-free performance which is common for Corsair’s products.

Now, let’s continue our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review and look at the product’s different specifications. 

Specifications

As the product’s name states, the Vengeance RGB RT’s memory is the DDR4 type. It has a total of 32GB for its memory, and RGB dynamic multi-zone LED lights. 

The product’s tested latency, voltage, and speed are 18-22-22-42, 1.35, and 3,600 respectively. While for its SPD latency, speed, and voltage, these are 22-22-22-53, 3,200MHz, and 1.2V respectively. 

This DDR4 RAM’s speed rating is at PC4-28,800 (3,600MHz). 

When it comes to its compatibility, the product works ideally with the Intel 300, 400, and 500 Series. Plus, it functions adequately with the AMD TRX40 and the AMD 300, 400, and 500 Series.

The Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM’s heat spreader is made from anodised aluminium. Plus, it has a 288 package memory pin and DIMM package memory format.  

Lastly, the DDR4 RAM’s performance profile is the XMP 2.0

See also

Hands-on with the Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM

This is where we get more hands-on with the product in our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review. That means, we’ll see how well it performed during our tests, and if it’s something worth adding to your rig.

But before we get to its performance, let’s first discuss the iCUE software. 

iCUE Software

Like other products from Corsair, the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM is configured via the iCUE Software. The interface is currently on its 4th version which has a new and cleaner interface. After installing iCUE Software, all the modules we installed on the motherboard were automatically detected.

When it came to the interface, the first thing we found was a list of customisable Corsair components via iCUE. We also found a list of configuration profiles on the left that we were able to modify or delete. Plus, the software allowed creating new profiles based on our preference.

Upon accessing the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM, we saw a section where we could establish the location of the memory sticks. The RGB animation reacted depending on our distribution of memories. 

Each memory stick of the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM kit has 10 RGB LEDs, totalling to 40 LEDs. We were able to configure these one by one via the iCUE Software. 

For RGB configuration, iCUE Software offers a long list of predefined animations and the option to create a custom one. We were able to set different colours, speeds, and several layers, allowing us to practically do what we wanted. 

iCUE Software is undoubtedly one of the software programs that offer the most versatile and customisable RGB settings. Even though the memory sticks had 10 LEDs each, it allowed customising one, a few, or all LEDs.

Customising the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM with the iCUE Software was a great experience for us. The interface was user-friendly and easy to use, and we didn’t have any issues like lagging and freezing.

Of course, our Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM review doesn’t end here. We also tested the product to see how well it performed. It’s to help you determine if this memory kit is the right upgrade for your system.

Performance of the Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM

The performance of the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM was one of the things we enjoyed during our tests. Although the memory sticks got warm under extreme circumstances, we didn’t see any temperature issues.

Overall, we were very satisfied with the performance of the Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM. Among the memory kits we’ve tested, this is one of the best performers. It’s an excellent component to have in your system if you’re looking to upgrade your build.

Aside from using the Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM, we also checked out the performance of its RGB lighting.

Compared to the Vengeance Pro SL and previous generations of Corsair’s RAM, this kit had more powerful light. The LEDs were eye-catching, striking, and spectacular especially when installed on plates with RGB.

The memory’s diffuser worked well for individual LEDs, but the dynamic effects were more noticeable in slow to medium speed. For colour transitions, these were smooth with consecutive lighting coming off the memory kit.

Corsair masters the intensity of colours with a soft blend for the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM’s lighting. The triangles on the light pipes were a nice touch since it added to the memory kit’s flair.

Corsair Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM Review Summary

The Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM shows that Corsair is making way for the new generation of RAM, the DDR5. It has great specifications and features, like the optimised Micron chip modules and instant overclocking.

Other than having great features, its high-quality aluminium casing makes it durable while keeping its sleek and classy look. Another bonus is the memory kit’s powerful RGB which can be configured via the updated and improved iCUE Software. The RGB lighting can also be synchronised with the rest of iCUE-compatible Corsair gear in your system for added aesthetics.

Overall, we were satisfied with this memory kit, so we’re recommending it. It offers great aesthetics, durable construction, and superior performance. To get your hands on the Vengeance RGB RT DDR4 RAM, you can purchase it from the company’s official website.

Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 Memory Review

Corsair is constantly improving the performance and design of its DDR memory series. Early this year, Corsair released the Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 memory series. The SL series is a new range of high-performance DDR4 memory kits in addition to its Vengeance RGB PRO lineup. It is similar to the Vengenace RGB PRO but with SLight physical and aesthetic changes. If you’re looking for a DDR4 memory that performs well, without breaking the bank and with RGB lighting, check out our Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 review below.

In This Review

Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4-3200MHz CL16 Review

There are several improvements present on the newer Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 memory kits. For starters, Corsair has adjusted its height to only 44mm tall. It offers better compatibility and clearance, especially with a tower-type CPU air cooler. There is also a ten RGB lighting zone that is fully customizable using the Corsair iCUE software.

As for the internals, it is similar to the Vengeance RGB PRO DDR4 series. It’s still the same high-performance and reliable memory, with each memory chip carefully screened and selected for high performance and overclocking potential.

When it comes to platform compatibility, the Vengeance RGB PRO SL is optimized for Intel and AMD motherboards. It is also available from 16GB up to 128GB memory kits, with speeds of up to 3600MHz. Finally, it is available in both black and white color themes. Now let’s take a closer look at the memory itself.

Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4-3200MHz Specifications

Packaging and Closer Look

The kit that we have here is a DDR4-3200MHz CL16 with a 32GB capacity, four sticks of 8GB memory. Corsair adopted a new style for its packaging, generally with the triangle pattern. You can also see this kind of pattern on Corsair’s chassis and other products.

Inside are four sticks of DDR4 memory, 8GB each. The dual memory kit is similar, but the retail box is slimmer since it only houses two sticks inside.

There are only two (major) differences between the Vengeance RGB PRO and RGB PRO SL. One is the height, from 51mm of the RGB PRO down to 44mm of the RGB PRO SL. Another is they changed the shape of the cutouts. The RGB PRO has diamond cutouts on its heat spreader, meanwhile, the new SL has triangle cutouts. As I mentioned earlier, the difference is SLight only.

The Vengeance RGB PRO SL (still) features an aluminum heat spreader and the internal chips and design of the custom PCB are similar to the older RGB PRO kits. And yes, it feels solid and premium on hand.

Unlike the Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB DDR4, the Vengeance RGB PRO SL only has 10 regular RGB LEDs. The Dominator Platinum uses Corsair’s Capellix RGB LEDs, and there are twelve of them. So, the RGB lighting on the Dominator Platinum looks more saturated and vibrant.

I’m not sure how many RGB LEDs the older Vengeance RGB PRO DDR4 has, I think 5 if I am not mistaken. But the PRO SL has 10 RGB LEDs, making it brighter and offering more room for customization. But still not as saturated looking as the Capellix RGB LEDs.

Corsair iCUE Software

Speaking of customization, you’ll need to install Corsair’s iCUE software so that you can fully customize the RGB lighting. I think software from the motherboard manufacturers will also work and may give you a certain amount of control. But you’ll have better control and customization with the iCUE software.

Aside from RGB lighting customization, users can check the status of the Vengeance RGB PRO SL as well. The iCUE software can provide the memory kit’s real-time temperature and can display it in graph form as well.

Test System Used

In testing the Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 memory, I’m using a Z590 motherboard powered by an Intel Core i5-11400F. Below are the rest of the specifications of the system:

Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4-3200MHz Benchmark Results

AIDA64 Memory Benchmark Results

I’m not expecting that the Vengeance RGB PRO SL will perform faster than a 3600MHz or 4000MHz memory kit. But I am expecting that, at least, it offers a performance expected from a DDR4-3200MHz memory kit.

Well, my Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4-3200MHz CL16 memory kit did perform as expected. Its performance is quite stable and consistent. Surprisingly, it outperformed my Dominator Platinum by a little bit in the AIDA64 memory benchmark.

There’s no way a 3200MHz memory kit would outperform a 4000MHz memory kit. So I was not expecting it would outperform the Thermaltake Toughram XG RGB DDR4-4000. But at least you can see that the performance isn’t that far and the Vengeance RGB PRO SL’s latency speed is slightly better than the DDR4-4000MHz memory kit that I have.

SiSoft Sandra Memory Benchmark Results

We can see a similar scenario using SiSoft Sandra’s memory benchmark suite. Although, surprisingly, the Vengeance RGB PRO SL outperformed Lexar’s DDR4-3600 CL18 memory in the memory bandwidth test. And it outperformed it again on the overall memory score, including my Dominator Platinum with the same speed.

I’m not sure how it outperformed the Dominator Platinum, perhaps my kit was older or perhaps the memory chips weren’t performing well compared to the newer Vengeance RGB PRO SL. Either way, I would say that the performance of this memory kit is good overall in general.

Pricing and Availability

The Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 memory kit is now available in both black and white color. It is also backed by a limited lifetime warranty, alongside Corsair’s worldwide customer service and technical support network. The memory kit that I have here, DDR4-3200MHz CL16 32GB (4x8GB) came with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $169.99 USD. Memory prices do change from time to time. So, for the latest pricing and availability, kindly follow the links below.

Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 memory latest pricing and availability: (#ad)
For the US: it is available at Newegg here
For the UK: it is available at Amazon UK here

Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 Review Conclusion

Just like the original Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO, the newer Vengeance RGB PRO SL is a good solid performing DDR4 memory kit overall. It’s nice to see that its height was adjusted and lowered and there are now 10 RGB lighting zones. The design and aesthetic look and feel premium and I think it would look nice on a system full of RGB lighting.

There are a couple of things that one may need to consider before deciding to get this memory stick. These Vengeance RGB PRO SL aren’t really “overclocking” memory kits. If you want to experiment with overclocking, you’ll have better results with the Dominator Platinum kits. Also, at this time, the highest memory speed available is only up to 3600MHz CL18. I hope there would be more options in the future. But to be honest, a 3200MHz or 3600MHz memory kit is sufficient for gaming and day-to-day use.

Other than that, there’s nothing to dislike about the Vengeance RGB PRO SL. Oh, it would be nice if they used Capellix RGB LEDs instead of regular RGB LEDs. I think it would look much better since the colors will be more saturated and vibrant.

At the end of the day, if you like some RGB lighting on your system and you like its design. I don’t think the Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO SL DDR4 would disappoint you, especially with its competitive pricing and great quality.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 2x8GB Review: Short On Height, High On AMD Performance

Tom’s Hardware Verdict

The Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 is a great memory kit for AMD owners that don’t have the luxury of a lot of clearance space under their CPU air coolers.

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Products don’t always go through modifications because there’s a defect; sometimes manufacturers revamp successful products because they see an opportunity for improvement. That was probably the idea behind Corsair’s reworking of its thriving Vengeance RGB Pro memory, which already holds a spot on our Best RAM list. For those that aren’t fans of the brand, the Vengeance RGB Pro SL will look like a brand piece of memory, but Corsair aficionados, on the other hand, will likely spot the differences right off the bat.

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Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The Vengeance RGB Pro SL retains a similar design as the normal Vengeance RGB Pro. The memory modules still feature a black PCB with a matching black, anodized aluminum heat spreader. The small aesthetic changes include the small triangle cutouts and a different selection of logos.

  • Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 2x8GB (16GB Black) at Amazon for $69.99

The biggest difference between the SL and non-SL versions is the height. The original Vengeance RGB Pro memory modules are 51mm (2 inches) tall, while the SL variant checks in at 44.8mm (1.76 inches) tall. Corsair basically reduced the height by 12.2%, which should be sufficient to make the Vengeance RGB Pro SL fit under the most CPU air coolers and compact cases.

Despite the height reduction, the RGB diffuser remains intact on the Vengeance RGB Pro SL. There are 10 individually addressable onboard RGB LEDs inside the diffuser to provide bright and vibrant lighting. You’ll have to use Corsair’s iCUE software to take full advantage of the Vengeance RGB Pro SL’s illumination, which means installing another piece of software on your system.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The Vengeance RGB Pro SL consists of an eight-layer custom PCB with Samsung K4A8G085WB-BCPB (B-die) integrated circuits (ICs). The memory kit is comprised of a pair of 8GB memory modules with a single-rank design.

Out of the box, the memory operates at DDR4-2666 with dull primary timings fixed at 18-18-18-43. The Vengeance RGB Pro SL has a single XMP profile for DDR4-3600, so you can’t really go wrong. It configures the timings to 18-22-22-42 and the DRAM voltage up to 1.35V. For more on timings and frequency considerations, see our PC Memory 101 feature, as well as our How to Shop for RAM story.

Comparison Hardware

Memory Kit Part Number Capacity Data Rate Primary Timings Voltage Warranty
G.Skill Trident Z Neo F4-3600C14D-16GTZNB 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 14-15-15-35 (2T) 1.45 Volts Lifetime
Adata XPG Spectrix D60G AX4U360038G14C-DT60 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 14-15-15-35 (2T) 1.45 Volts Lifetime
TeamGroup T-Force Xtreem ARGB TF10D416G3600HC14CDC01 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 14-15-15-35 (2T) 1.45 Volts Lifetime
Gigabyte Aorus RGB Memory GP-AR36C18S8K2HU416R 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 18-19-19-39 (2T) 1.35 Volts Lifetime
HP V8 7EH92AA#ABM x 2 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 18-20-20-40 (2T) 1. 35 Volts 5 Years
Adata XPG Spectrix D50 AX4U360038G18A-DT50 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 18-20-20-42 (2T) 1.35 Volts Lifetime
Predator Talos BL.9BWWR.215 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 18-20-20-42 (2T) 1.35 Volts Lifetime
Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL CMh26GX4M2Z3600C18 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 18-22-22-42 (2T) 1.35 Volts Lifetime
GeIL Orion AMD Edition GAOR416GB3600C18BDC 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 (XMP) 18-22-22-42 (2T) 1.35 Volts Lifetime

Our Intel test system consists of an Intel Core i9-10900K and Asus ROG Maximus XII Apex on the 0901 firmware. On the opposite end, the AMD testbed for RAM benchmarks leverages an AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and Gigabyte B550 Aorus Master with the F13e firmware. The MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Gaming Trio handles the gaming workloads on both platforms.

Intel Performance

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The Vengeance RGB Pro SL placed at the bottom of the charts on our Intel platform. The memory’s strongest showing came in the 7-Zip compression workload, where it ranked second and outperformed the slowest memory kit by up to 7.3%. As for gaming performance, the Vengeance RGB Pro SL’s standing didn’t change.

AMD Performance

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The competition was tight on the AMD platform. Nevertheless, the Vengeance RGB Pro SL outperformed some of the faster rivals and came in at the second position on the performance charts. Once again, the memory performed the best in 7-Zip compression, beating the slowest memory kit by up to 6.8%.

Overclocking and Latency Tuning

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Memory Review (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Despite employing Samsung B-die ICs, the Vengeance RGB Pro SL doesn’t have any fuel left in the tank. Increasing the DRAM voltage to 1.45V only got us to DDR4-3866, and we also had to sacrifice timings to get there. The memory wasn’t stable with any value below 19-22-22-40.

Lowest Stable Timings

Memory Kit DDR4-3600 (1.45V) DDR4-3733 (1.45V) DDR4-3866 (1.45V) DDR4-3900 (1.45V) DDR4-4000 (1.45V) DDR4-4133 (1. 45V) DDR4-4200 (1.45V)
G.Skill Trident Z Neo 13-16-16-36 (2T) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19-19-19-39 (2T)
Adata XPG Spectrix D60G 13-15-15-35 (2T) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 20-19-19-39 (2T)
Team Group T-Force Xtreem ARGB 13-14-14-35 (2T) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19-19-19-39 (2T)
HP V8 14-19-19-39 (2T) N/A N/A N/A N/A 18-22-22-42 (2T) N/A
Adata XPG Spectrix D50 14-19-19-39 (2T) N/A N/A N/A 18-22-22-42 (2T) N/A N/A
Gigabyte Aorus RGB Memory 16-19-19-39 (2T) N/A N/A 20-20-20-40 (2T) N/A N/A N/A
Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro SL 16-20-20-40 (2t) N/A 19-22-22-40 N/A N/A N/A N/A
GeIL Orion AMD Edition 16-20-20-40 (2T) 19-22-22-42 (2T) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

The Vengeance RGB Pro SL’s default XMP timings are 18-22-22-42 at 1. 35V. A small voltage bump up to 1.45V allowed the memory to run at 16-20-20-40, making it a lot more attractive.

Corsair markets the RAM as having a compact form factor. It’s shorter than the previous revision, but it’s not exactly considered low-profile, either. Even at 44.8mm, the memory shouldn’t cause any conflicts with CPU air coolers, but it wouldn’t hurt to measure the clearance space before picking up the Vengeance RGB Pro SL if you have an overly large cooler. 

You shouldn’t have any qualms with the Vengeance RGB Pro SL’s design as the memory looks good, just like its predecessors. Performance, however, is another case. Evidently, the Vengeance RGB Pro SL performs better on AMD systems than Intel systems, so that’s one point to take into account. The Vengeance RGB Pro SL DDR4-3600 C18 retails for $109.99 , and it’s not a bad price considering there are equal or slower competitors out there that cost more than Corsair’s kit. 

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro RAM review: In a class of its own

Corsair made over $1 billion in revenue in 2019, and the company has an astounding 42% share in the PC components segment in the U.S. Corsair dominates when it comes to memory, power supplies, and cases, and the company is the best-selling gaming keyboard vendor in the U.S.

Memory continues to be the single biggest category for Corsair, accounting for $429 million in revenue last year. While Corsair relies on third-party vendors to manufacture most of its gaming peripherals and other products, it runs the memory business on its own, sourcing DRAM modules from SK Hynix and Samsung and making finished kits in a facility in Taiwan.

With the Vengeance RGB Pro, Corsair is targeting the enthusiast segment. The DRAM kit is available from 2666MHz and goes all the way up to 4400MHz. I’m testing the 3000MHz option, with this particular variant striking the ideal balance between value and performance. Let’s take a look at what the Vengeance RGB Pro has to offer, and why it is the ideal DRAM for your next RGB build.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro

Bottom line: With excellent performance backed by multi-zone RGB lighting, the Vengeance RGB Pro is one of the best DRAM kits you can buy right now. With plenty of configurations to choose from and highly adjustable lighting, this is the DRAM to beat.

For
  • Multi-zone RGB lighting
  • Incredible performance
  • Highly configurable via iCUE
  • Decent value
Against
  • Tall profile

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro What I like

Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central)

The Vengeance RGB Pro series is available in a dizzying array of configuration options. Corsair sells the DDR4 memory in 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB variants, and offers kits that go up to 256GB. I’m using a 32GB kit that consists of four 8GB DRAM modules clocked at 3000MHz (CL15), with this variant available for $175 . The 32GB memory kit hits the sweet spot for most builds, and as a result Corsair a wealth of options, including a base 2666MHz CL16 configuration that costs $170 going all the way up to a 4400MHz CL18 variant that retails for $760 .

The Vengeance Pro delivers outstanding performance and diffused RGB lighting.

There are two points to consider when picking up a DRAM module. The first is the speed: a DRAM module with a 3000MHz or 3600MHz frequency is usually a better choice over a 2600MHz option, but you’ll have to make sure that the Intel or AMD CPU that you’re using can take advantage of those speeds. If you have a Ryzen 5 series or above or are using an Intel 8th Gen Core CPU and above, you should be fine.

DRAM with a 2666MHz frequency should be more than enough for most use cases, but considering the minor difference in cost between 2666MHz and 3000/3200MHz, you’re better off choosing either of the latter options. The other point to note when choosing RAM is the latency. You’ll see a CL number against each module — the DRAM module I’m testing today has CL15. CL stands for CAS (Column Access Strobe) latency, and it determines how fast the DRAM module can access information. A lower figure here means lower latency, and faster information retrieval.

CAS latency is one part of a broader set of numbers that correspond to memory timing. For the 32GB Vengeance Pro module I’m testing, those figures look like this: 15-17-17-35. The first number is the CAS latency, and that has the biggest impact on performance.

Image 1 of 5

Now that you have a high-level overview of how DRAM works, let’s look at the Vengeance Pro. Corsair was one of the first brands to go all-in on RGB lighting, and the Vengeance Pro is available with black and white heat spreaders made out of aluminum. There’s a light bar that runs across the length of the DRAM module, and the textured matte finish looks great.

The RGB lighting on the Vengeance Pro is powered directly by the DIMM slots, and each light bar contains 10 LEDs that provide uniform backlighting. The lighting is controllable via Corsair’s iCUE software, and you can choose from solid colors to various fade and transition effects. If you have other Corsair products with RGB lighting, you get the ability to synchronize lighting effects.

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

I tested the memory with its 3000MHz profile, and it delivers outstanding figures across the board. Memory read/write performance is stellar, and the latency at 55.3ns is lower than its rivals. For what you’re ultimately paying here, you’re getting a great value. You can always overclock the DRAM module to hit higher frequencies, but you’ll run into diminishing returns pretty soon. For most use cases, the 3000MHz profile is more than adequate.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro What needs work

Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central)

With a profile of 51mm, the Vengeance RGB Pro isn’t suited for small form factor (SFF) builds. So if you are looking to build a home theater PC and looking at a SFF case, be sure to see the memory clearance for that particular case and whether the Vengeance Pro will slot in. Of course, if you don’t want the RGB lightbar, you can just buy the regular non-RGB version and save some cash.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro The competition

Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central)

You can pick up DRAM modules with RGB lighting from a host of manufacturers, with the $170 G.SKILL TridentZ RGB a close contender to the Vengeance Pro. The TridentZ kit is also available in a 4 x 8GB configuration at 3200MHz and CL16, and you get vibrant RGB lighting as well.

If you’re looking for a more value-focused pick, the $120 TEAMGROUP T-Force Delta RGB is a decent choice. You get two 16GB DRAM modules at 3200MHz and CL16, and the RGB light bar extends down the sides as well, resulting in a more diffused backlight.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Should you buy?

Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central)

You should buy this if .

..

  • You want diffused RGB lighting that looks great
  • You need reliable performance with a lot of overclocking headroom
  • You’re investing in Corsair’s iCUE platform

You should not buy this if …

  • You have a case with limited clearance for memory

Corsair made its name on the back of its memory business, so it’s no wonder that the Vengeance Pro continues to be the DRAM module to beat. The build quality is as robust as it gets thanks to the aluminum heat spreader, the RGB light bar with 10 integrated LEDs provides diffused lighting, and you get the ability to customize the lighting effects with iCUE. This truly is one of the best DDR4 RAM kits.

Combine that with stellar performance at 3000MHz, configuration options that go up to 4400MHz, and overclocking potential, and it’s safe to see why the Vengeance Pro is the ideal DRAM module for your next build.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro

Bottom line: With outstanding performance, diffused RGB lighting, and robust build quality, the Vengeance Pro RGB ticks all the right boxes. If you’re looking to pick up a DRAM module for your next build, the Vengeance Pro should be the default option.

Best DDR4 RAM: Fastest memory for your AMD PC or Intel

Best DDR4 RAM 2020: Building a PC? We test the best RAM options out there and compare the results.

Which is the best DDR4 RAM to buy? Here are the best we’ve reviewed in our group test

Out of the 15 kits that we tested, there are three that stood out. The Corsair Vengeance LPX 2 x 8GB is the best high-end DDR4 kit we found on the market. This high-end kit is designed around performance rather than aesthetics, and is certainly the best when it comes to high-end speed and performance. If you’re on a budget, then the Crucial Ballistix Sport LT White 2 x 8GB would make an excellent choice. We’d also recommend the Team Group Dark Pro 2 x 4GB as another good affordable alternative.

1. Corsair Vengeance LPX 2 x 8GB (CMK16GX4M2B3200C16)

The best high-end DDR4

Key features

  • Review price: £173 for 2x8GB (£10. 81/GB)
  • Also available: £115 for 2x4GB (£14.75/GB) and £361 for 2x16GB (£11.28/GB)
  • 3200MHz speeds

Why we liked the Corsair Vengeance LPX 2 x 8GB (CMK16GX4M2B3200C16)

This kit is our favourite high-end DDR4 product, although we’ll concede that it doesn’t look like it. Corsair’s memory modules are coated with plain, slatted heatsinks made of solid aluminium, and they’re low-profile too – so these DIMMs are some of the smallest I’ve ever seen.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The lack of RGB LEDs means there’s more room in the budget to make the memory faster, and the smaller design means it will be easier to install chunky cooling hardware without the memory getting in the way. This kind of design certainly goes against the current trend for big sticks of memory with plenty of lighting, but I’m happy to forego RGB LEDs if it means my memory is quicker and more reliable.

Corsair’s kit is designed around performance rather than aesthetic features, so it’s no surprise to see it running at 3200MHz – one of the highest speeds in this group. Elsewhere, latency comes in at 16-18-18-36, and the kit is available in white, blue or red variations to match your machine.

This 16GB Corsair kit costs £173, which brings it in at £10.81-per-gigabyte – right in the middle of my high-end group. It’s also available in different capacities. A version with two 4GB sticks costs £115, and a 32GB kit is a whopping £361.

The decision to concentrate on speed rather than performance has paid off. The Corsair’s single-threaded bandwidth figure of 15.45GB/sec is one of the best here, and its global latency result of 28.9ns tops the table, along with the Team Group Night Hawk RGB kit.

The Corsair memory delivered the high-end group’s best results in the single- and multi-threaded cache bandwidth benchmarks, and its Cinebench multi-core score of 2194cb is the best of any high-end kit in this group.

Its Geekbench results were barely behind the Team Group kit, but better than my three other high-end picks. Its 3DMark: Fire Strike score of 6817 was fine and better than the Night Hawk memory.

The Corsair kit delivered a Ghost Recon average of 37.26fps. That’s right in the middle of the high-end group. Other kits in this group are a little quicker, but they tend to be slower in many other benchmarks – and so, for all-round performance, that’s no good.

Corsair’s kit isn’t just fast – it’s consistent, too. Its theoretical results are often the best in the high-end group, and no other expensive kit can offer the balance and speed that Corsair has served up across real-world application and gaming tests. It doesn’t have snazzy RGB LEDs and other eye-catching features, perhaps, but this is the top kit when it comes to high-end speed and performance.

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2. Crucial Ballistix Sport LT White 2 x 8GB (BLS2C8G4D26BFSC)

Excellent budget DDR4

Key features

  • Review price: £149 for 2x8GB (£9.31/GB)
  • Also available: 2x4GB for £72 (£9/GB)
  • 2666MHz speeds

Why we liked the Crucial Ballistix Sport LT White 2 x 8GB (BLS2C8G4D26BFSC)

The Crucial Ballistix Sport LT White memory is one of the most affordable kits in this test, at just £9. 31 per gigabyte, but that doesn’t mean you lose out on looks. The compact sticks are made of white, camo-patterned metal, and they’re topped with neat cut-outs.

You don’t lose out on features, either. There’s 16GB of capacity, and the Ballistix Sport rattles along at 2666MHz – right in the middle of the range of DDR4 speeds, and fast enough to ensure that this DDR4 doesn’t lose much ground when compared to pricier kits.

This kit serves up latency of 16-18-18, and it doesn’t have ECC certification – no surprise for an affordable consumer kit. If you’re interested in the equivalent memory but in a more affordable 2 x 4GB configuration then it will cost £72, or £9 per gigabyte.

The Crucial’s SiSoft Sandra bandwidth figures of 15.3GB/sec and 32.48GB/sec are marginally slower than the Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition and Team Group Dark Pro kits, but both of those products are more expensive; and in this category, I’m looking at value. Also bear in mind that the Corsair kit is a 32GB product, rather than 16GB product.

The Crucial’s instruction latency speed of 13.6ns is one of the best from my budget group, and its 51.32GB/sec single-threaded cache bandwidth result is similarly impressive.

The Ballistix’s theoretical results were decent, and its application pace was better. Its Cinebench multi-core result of 2181cb is one the best of any of the budget kits, and no other kit could offer faster and more balanced pace in the Geekbench tests.

The Ballistix kit may be one of the most affordable kits, but benchmarks indicate that it still offers ample performance in the majority of tasks – this 16GB, 2666MHz kit will handle applications and work, with few bits of software that really need anything more in your average, consumer-grade system.

There’s one caveat – and that’s gaming. The Crucial’s Ghost Recon average of 37.14fps is the worst of any budget kit, and is more than a frame per second behind the Corsair and Team Group products. It isn’t going to make or break a gaming rig, but it’s worth bearing in mind.

That’s the only black mark against these attractive RAM modules, though. It’s consistent and fast in application tests and returns solid results in theoretical benchmarks, plus it’s a little cheaper than other budget kits that are occasionally a bit quicker. That makes it the affordable DDR4 choice.

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3. Team Group Dark Pro 2 x 4GB (TDPRD48G3000HC15ADC01)

An excellent £10/GB choice

Key features

  • Review price: £80 for 2x 4GB (£10/GB)
  • Also available: £140 for 2x 8GB (£8.75/GB)
  • 3000MHz speeds

Why we liked the Team Group Dark Pro 2 x 4GB (TDPRD48G3000HC15ADC01)

Oddly enough, the best mid-range kit also offers one of the smallest capacities in the entire group – a modest 8GB spread across two sticks.

Instead of increasing size, Team Group has ramped up the speed. Its 3000MHz classification puts it right at the top of the table when it comes to mid-range DDR4 kits.

Team Group’s 8GB costs £80, which works out to a cool £10 per gigabyte. This is a little more expensive than some of its rivals, but not by enough to dent your wallet. Pleasingly, the 16GB variant costs £140, which works out at a cheap £8.75 per gigabyte.

This kit serves up 15-15-15-35 latency figures, and it certainly looks the part. It arrives in a smart box, and the sticks themselves are made of black metal, with a chunky heatsink on top and milled red hexagons down both sides. There’s no lighting, though – you’ll have to pay a bit more for that.

The Team Group kit looks good and performs solidly. Its single-threaded bandwidth figure of 16.08GB/sec is the best of the mid-range group and is the only kit to get beyond 16GB/sec. In addition, its global and instruction latency results are the fastest here, which means rapid response times.

Other mid-range kits have better single-threaded cache bandwidth than this product, and its multi-threaded throughput is similarly solid.

The Team Group’s Cinebench multi-core result of 2200cb is the best in the mid-range group, and it led the way in that app’s OpenGL test too. It also dominated in both Geekbench tests.

It’s more middling in gaming, but that’s our only issue. If that’s important to you then the Corsair Vengeance RGB is a better mainstream option.

It’s hardly going to ruin gaming experience, though, because we’re talking about fine margins in these benchmarks – and in the rest of our tests the Team Group is super-impressive. Despite its 8GB capacity it’s the fastest mid-range kit in most of the benchmarks, and that makes it a clear winner.


Best of the rest – Low-end

We may have picked Crucial’s Ballistix Sport LT as my favourite budget kit, but that product isn’t the only one worth considering if you need affordable memory.

The best runner-up is Team Group’s Dark Pro (TDRPD416G3200HC14ADC01), which is a 16GB kit that runs at 3200MHz. At £156 it’s a bit pricier than the Ballistix kit, but it performs better when it comes to gaming – which was the only area where Ballistix fell behind.

The Team Group kit delivers the budget group’s best Ghost Recon scores, and also came first in Cinebench’s OpenGL test. It’s patchier in theoretical tests and application benchmarks, but it’s a very solid second place in this group.

The Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition (CMD32GX4M2C3200C14T) is one of the cheapest ways to get your hands on 32GB of DDR4, with the sticks coming in at just £9.37 per gigabyte. That’s relatively affordable, and they look the part, too, with heat-treated metal on top and brushed metal beneath.

The Corsair kit is a solid performer in most of the theoretical tests, and it’s also good for gaming. However, in terms of application tests it’s the poorest in the budget group , and so isn’t a winner for me.

I tested two cheaper kits. The G.Skill Ripjaw V Series (F4-2400C15D-16GVR) is a 16GB product rated for 2400MHz, and it costs £9.18 per gigabyte. This appears decent, but it was one of the worst performers in theoretical tests and only mediocre in real-world benchmarks.

The cheapest kit I tested was the Kingston HyperX Fury Black (HX421C14GBK2/8), which is a 2 x 4GB set that runs at just 2133MHz. It’s super-cheap at £8.75 per gigabyte, but it was consistently one of the poorest performers – so only worth buying if you’re on a tight budget.

Below are the performance graphs for five of our benchmark tests.


Best of the rest – Mid-range memory

My top mid-range kit was the Team Group Dark Pro, which proved that you don’t need more than 8GB of memory to perform to a high standard in a slew of benchmarks.

As ever, though, some people will need more capacity – and the market is packed with alternatives.

The second-place mainstream kit comes from Corsair. Its Vengeance RGB kit (CMR16GX4M2C3000C15) is decorated with RGB LEDs and sturdy metal, and the £155 price for a 16GB, 3000MHz kit plants it firmly in the middle of the group. It’s a consistent performer, with solid results in every benchmark and especially impressive speeds in Cinebench’s application tests. It’s also the best bet for gaming thanks to reasonable Ghost Recon pace and decent results elsewhere.

I could also recommend the Kingston HyperX Fury Black 16GB (HX426C16FB2K2/16) for gaming, because its Ghost Recon figures were the best of all the mid-range kits – but this doesn’t tell the whole story. It’s quick in those tests, but the poorest mid-range kit in almost all other benchmarks – no surprise when its 2666MHz speed falls behind most of its rivals.

The remaining mid-range kits did little to stand out. The Crucial Ballistix Tactical (BLT2C8G4D30AETA) looks good thanks to gunmetal grey design, it’s pleasingly low profile, and it has great theoretical pace. However, its real-world performance is slow and inconsistent, and its £10.50 per gigabyte price is the highest in the mid-range group.

G.Skill’s Trident Z (F4-3200C16D-16GTZB) has a middling price of £9.87 per gigabyte and boasts a 3200MHz clock speed and bright metal design, but nothing stands out beyond its looks – it’s entirely ordinary in virtually every benchmark.

Kingston’s HyperX Predator (HX424C12PB3k2/32) costs £10 per gigabyte, so it also falls into mid-table – but, impressively, it’s the only mid-range kit to serve up a huge 32GB of memory. Its 2,400MHz clock speed means it’s unable to impress in any of the theoretical tests, its application scores were slow, and it was inconsistent in games – its solid Ghost Recon minimum fps was undermined by the group’s worst average fps. That said, it’s a decent option if you’d like 32GB of memory without spending a relative fortune.


Best of the rest – High-end DDR4

The second-place kit in the high-end test comes from Team Group. Its Dark Night Hawk RGB (TF1D416G3200HC16CDC01) kit mixes outlandish angled design with RGB LEDs, and its £170 price translates to £10.62 per gigabyte – a decent price for a kit sporting such design and a 3200MHz clock speed.

It served up table-topping scores in precisely half of my theoretical benchmarks, and it was excellent in Geekbench too. However, it fell behind in gaming benchmarks and proved disappointing in Cinebench’s tests. As a result, it slips behind the Corsair, which was more consistent.

Crucial’s Ballistix Elite kit didn’t live up to its name. This memory has a mighty 3466MHz clock speed and a rock-solid metal design, but it fell into the middle of the results tables when it came to performance across all the tests. It isn’t bad at all, but it was never able to outpace other kits. And, at £12 per gigabyte, it’s expensive.

The G.Skill Trident Z RGB (F4-3200C14D-16GTZR) is another particularly expensive kit, and it comes with plenty of lighting and a great-looking brushed metal design. At £220 for 16GB of 3200MHz DDR4, it’s the priciest high-end kit, but its performance was the most inconsistent. It led the way in a couple of tests, propped up the table in others, but mostly stayed in the middle of the pack.


DDR4

What is it good for?

The current generation of PC memory, DDR4, was introduced way back in 2013. We don’t expect DDR5 modules to be available until 2020 at the earliest.

DDR4 offered improvements on its predecessor in several ways. For starters, speeds are better: DDR3 memory ran between 800MHz and 2133MHz, but DDR4 runs at 2133MHz and above.

Capacities have improved, too, with the maximum amount per module now 512GB rather than 128GB. That’s a theoretical limit for most users, because they just won’t need that much RAM, but it’s nice to see the march of progress.

Related: RAM for beginners

DDR4 memory sticks consume less power than their DDR3 equivalents, but their latency is also a little higher. In theory, this means response times will be slower, but DDR4’s increased speeds eliminate that bottleneck.

There have been a host of cosmetic changes arrive in the DDR4 market too. The big trend is RGB LEDs, which allow the sticks to display any colour in a host of patterns. Those colours can be customised in software, from within Windows. Many high-end memory kits now have RGB LEDs built into their designs to help users put together choreographed, consistent machines.

Elsewhere, we’re seeing more metal on memory sticks – chunky aluminium DIMMs and brushed metal is now commonplace, even on budget products.

Related: All of our PC component guides

  • Best graphics card
  • Best processor for gaming
  • Best PC case
  • Best monitor
  • Best gaming monitor

What do you need?

It’s always important to consider how much memory you need and the speed required.

Handily, there are some simple rules to follow. These days, 4GB won’t be sufficient for anything other than a basic system. Instead, 8GB is the mainstream benchmark – this is enough memory to handle general-purpose computing and gaming without causing serious speed or performance issues.

If you have the cash to spend then 16GB is ideal. This will ensure that every current game will run smoothly, and it’s also enough to handle almost any work application.

There’s no real need to install 32GB of memory unless you regularly use high-end workstation or video editing applications; if you’re not using that kind of software then having 32GB of RAM is just a waste.

As a rule, it’s best to avoid 2133MHz memory if you can – at that low speed you’re likely to see performance drop, as the tests demonstrate. Memory clocked to 2400MHz won’t be brilliant, either.

We always recommend that people buy 2666MHz memory – or quicker, if the budget can stretch – to achieve the best balance between price and performance. At that level, the performance reduction is far smaller and more manageable when compared to true high-end kits.

At the high-end, meanwhile, most users don’t need to go beyond 3200MHz. At this level, you’ll see diminishing returns when it comes to performance boosts, so only the keenest of overclockers and benchmarkers need apply.

We’ve stuck to consumer-grade kit for this test, but we may stray towards 4000+MHz RAM in the future…

Related: Best Intel processor

What’s that weird latency figure?

Latency is a key memory specification, but it’s a bit of a mystery compared to more obvious attributes like speed and capacity. Latency figures refer to the time it takes for a processor to send a command and for the memory to respond.

Memory kits quote three or four latency figures that’ll appear as “15-17-17-35” on a manufacturer or retailer’s website. These represent different kinds of operations that memory will be asked to perform: the first figure is the main CAS latency figure, which represents the CPU asking for data and the memory releasing it. Other numbers represent tasks like switching to other lines of data, or the time taken for memory to activate and begin working.

These figures can be multiplied with the speed of the RAM’s clock cycle to give a result in nanoseconds, which is how long tasks take to complete. DDR4 memory generally has clock cycles that range between 12.5ns and 15ns, so I’m talking about incredibly fine margins – tiny differences that won’t make any sort of noticeable different to most machines. Broadly speaking, though, the lower the better.

Related: Best desktop PC

Consider your computer

It isn’t only about picking some memory sticks; you need to consider the rest of your system before you click on the checkout button.

On the Intel side, DDR4 works with Skylake (Intel 6th-gen Core) and Kaby Lake (Intel 7th-gen Core) processors, the 8th-gen Core chips and with Haswell-E and Skylake-X chips, and the recently-launched 9th gen processors.

This means you’re covered when it comes to more conventional consumer chips from the Pentium range right up to Core i7 and beyond, including the powerful, high-end beasts that Intel produces for workstation machines.

That’s great, but also look at Intel’s chipsets; the silicon on your motherboard will on occasion determine the kind of memory you can use. The chipsets used for Haswell-E and Skylake-X processors support quad-channel memory, which means you can use four sticks at once. The chipsets for Skylake and Kaby Lake support only dual-channel DDR4. We’ve only tested dual-channel memory here.

We’d also advise a browse of motherboard websites before you make a final buying decision. Every motherboard will support DDR4 at its conventional speeds, but pricier products will also support memory overclocking – so you’ll sometimes be able to run DDR4 at speeds that are way beyond 4000MHz.

The last time we tested DDR4 in 2016, the situation on AMD hardware was murky, but it’s now far better. AMD has now released its Ryzen processors, which offer full support for DDR4 memory at speeds of up to 2666MHz – although that figure will be increased to more conventional limits by motherboard manufacturers.

All of AMD’s new Threadripper processors use the Zen architecture, and all support quad-channel memory. The red team’s conventional Ryzen processors support dual-channel DDR4, just like Intel’s equivalents.

Related: Best AMD Ryzen CPUs

How we test DDR4 memory

We’ve tested all these kits on a machine with an Intel Core i9-7900X processor, Asus ROG Strix X299-E Gaming motherboard and Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphics card. This is a stupendously powerful PC that would normally run quad-channel memory; the specs of this machine means RAM will always be the bottleneck of performance, which is perfect for benchmarking.

The tests start with SiSoft Sandra, which runs each memory kit through a host of synthetic tests that are used to evaluate bandwidth, latency and throughput in a variety of scenarios.

After that, we use Cinebench and Geekbench, which provide a full-system benchmark for single- and multi-threaded performance, so we can determine the difference that memory kits make in these real-world scenarios. We’ve also tested in 3DMark and Ghost Recon: Wildlands to find out which kits are best for gaming.

What DDR4 will be making its way into your next gaming PC? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter @TrustedReviews.

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Review 2022

Launch of lighting solutions for the PC products and markets, this trend has spread like a pandemic and this fever is what majority of PC enthusiasts love today albeit a few advocating the other way around. It is about time that Corsair has released their addressable RGB Lighting enabled DDR4 kits called Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Review.

Their previous lighting solutions on the memory were based on non-digital RGB.  The Vengeance RGB Pros are their premium digital RGB Lighting kits with high performance. Our review sample is using Samsung B Die and DDR4 kits with these chips are reportedly scaling better with the Ryzen CPUs.

Recently, we have set up our AMD platform based test bench configuration with the idea of testing the incoming products for the review on both Intel and AMD platform to make our contents more effective and to cover both sides. AMD was kind enough to jump in and provided us with their consumer leading chip Ryzen 7 2700X.

Other manufacturers like Asus, Antec joined us and provided with their products for this test bench. Corsair was kind enough to sponsor us with their premium Vengeance Pro RGB kit and today I will be taking a look at this kit and will be testing it on our AMD test bench to see what it has to offer to the user.

Table of Contents

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Review

The Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro review is available in two colors; black and white. These kits are available in multiple configurations starting from basic 16GB (2x8GB) and going as high as 128GB using 8x16Gb configuration. Their rated frequencies range from 2666MHz to whopping 4700MHz. I will be taking a look at the block colored Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 2x8GB rated at 3200MHz using 16-18-18-36 timings at 1.35V.

These kits have Intel XMP 2.0 support and are compatible with Intel 100, 200, 300 series chipsets as well as X299 series. From AMD camp, they are compatible with 300, and 400 series chipsets. As I have tested this kit on AMD X470, I can tell you one thing for 100% confidence that my Ryzen 7 2700X is loving this kit.

These kits have anodized aluminum heatsinks on both sides which look that good in person but they catch fingerprints that easy as well. Besides performance, these kits pack stunning, vivid and fluid lighting effects to my utmost liking. Without further ado let’s begin. Also, keep in mind, we recommended the Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro as The Best DDR4 Ram For i9-12900k.

  • Product:               Vengeance RGB Pro 3200MHz CL 16
  • Manufacturer:       Corsair
  • Price:                  Check Price on Amazon

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Specs:

Corsair Vengeance Packaging and Unboxing:

The kit is shipped in Corsair’s typical packing box made of paperboard finished in the black and yellow colors. The packaging in itself speaks for the stuff. The front side of the box has a Corsair brand name and logo printed on the top left. DDR4, 2x8GB, 3200MHz which are the salient features of the kit at its very core are printed on the top right.

There is a picture of a single module in the middle with the diffuser illuminated in multiple colors to signify the digital lighting solution. The kit can be controlled using the Corsair’s iCUE software which can be downloaded free from their website. The kit is Intel XMP certified. VENGEANCE RGB PRO is printed at the bottom.

The backside of the box has a Corsair brand name and logo printed on the top left. Vengeance Pro RGB text is printed on the top right. The salient highlight of the kit is printed in 6 different languages. The iCUE is compatible with the Microsoft Windows 7, 8.1, and 10 OS.

In addition, this kit is compatible with the Gigabyte RGB Fusion and MSI Mystic Lighting solutions. I am surprised as no Asus AURA Sync support is there! There is a sticker pasted at the bottom with the serial no, part no labels of the kit. The kit is manufactured in Taiwan. On the right side of this label, x2 is printed on the yellow color background which indicates the no of modules in the packing. These kits are backed with a limited lifetime warranty.

The left and right sides are identical. They have a Corsair brand name and logo printed on the leftmost side. Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro printed in the center followed by the DDR4 text. The capacity of the kit is printed on the rightmost end.

The top and bottom covers have the Corsair brand name and logo printed in the center.

Opening the box will show a transparent container having two modules tucked in nicely.

Corsair Vengeance Closer Look:

It is time to take a look at the kit and discuss its design elements followed by the RGB lighting effect. Here is what Corsair is saying about it, “Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro series DDR4 memory lights up your PC with mesmerizing dynamic multi-zone RGB lighting while delivering the best in DDR4 performance and stability. Every module boasts ten RGB LEDs to deliver a stunning lighting experience, powered by Corsair iCUE software for in-depth lighting control and system-wide Corsair lighting synchronization.”

The Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Review comes in two basic colors namely black and white. These kits are available in multiple of 8GB modules. There is no less than 8GB module which makes sense to keep the costing in check. These kits start from 2666MHz and go up to whopping 4700MHz. Not all kits support such high-speed frequency so make sure to check for the specifications before buying.

There is a thermal sensor on each module as well. The only iCUE can read from these sensors though. Our kit has two modules with the capacity of each being 8GB. The base timings or SPD latency of the kit is 15-15-15-36 with base frequency or SPD speed of PC4-17000 (2133MHz) at 1.20V. The rated timings are 16-18-18-36 with the frequency of PC4-25600 (3200MHz) at 1.20V.

It is Non-ECC, Unbuffered DIMM with a 288-pin layout (DDR4). These kits are tested for Intel and AMD platforms for reliability and compatibility and are Intel XMP 2.0 ready. It is good to see that these kits are compatible with the AMD Ryzen based chips using AM4 socket and this is exactly why this kit is here as Corsair was kind enough to sponsor us for our newly setup AMD platform based test bench.

 

The kit has a black PCB and it is multi-layered. We can see ICs on both sides that could mean the same PCB is being used for all the capacities. Our kit has single sided modules. There are four memory chips on the left side and four on the right side.

There is a single thin thermal pad running across the entire length of the heat spreader on the non-populated side. On the populated side, each chip has its own black color thermal pad. As is the case with DDR4s, there is no chip in the middle of the PCB.

The dimension of a module is 142x45x7mm (LxHxW). The total height of a module is 50mm including the 288-pin connector. It is 45mm without the exposed PCB and connector. You would need to keep in mind the height of a module with respect to the CPU cooler as there is no point if the RGB enabled modules are blocked or hidden under the cooler.

Each IC has been carefully screened to ensure top-notch performance and extended overclocking potential. As mentioned earlier that the starting speed on these kits is 2666MHz which is now a standard DDR4 speed after 2133MHz and 3200MHz is a sweet spot these days particularly on the AM4 platform which is fastest JEDEC specifications (OC). These kits can go as high as 4700MHz (not all configurations) many thanks to hand-screened ICs and custom PCB.

The heat spreaders carry a bold yet pleasant design. They are made of anodized aluminum and finished in the black color. The heat spreaders are have vented slots on top end on both sides. Both sides vented slots faced each other and this design sits very well in the overall look and feel of the kit.

The vents also have another aesthetic purpose. They are right on top of the diffuser and the lighting would also reflect through these slots. There is a Corsair brand name and logo in the silver color finishing.

Vengeance RGB Pro is printed in the center on a black color plate which stands out from the rest of the heat spreader surface. The heat spreader is a fingerprint magnet. Keep that in mind and keep micro-fiber cloth ready for cleaning when needed.

The heat spreader is not fully covering the PCB from the left and right sides as PCB is exposed on these sides. Air ventilation is ensured from both ends. Text coding can be easily seen on the populated side of the PCB.

The other side of the modules has an identical layout and design. There is a sticker pasted in the center. This sticker is finished in the same design as is on the heat spreader. CMW16GX4M2C3200C16 is the identification part no of the kit. Type, speed, timing, the voltage of the memory are printed on the sticker as well.

Let’s take a look at the top of the modules where all the lighting magic comes from. There is a translucent diffuser on the top which runs across the entire length of the PCB. The first distinct feature of this diffuser is the layered design as it has 5 layered design to it which looks that good in person. The middle portion is recessed as compared to the left and the right sides. On the exterior ends, the diffuser has a sharp angular design which is covered by the heat spreader. This is the only area on the top where the heat spreader can be seen. Corsair has given maximum exposure to the lighting and surprisingly, there is no Corsair branding on the diffuser from any side. All that you would get from the top is fluid lighting.

There are 10 RGB LED zones under the diffuser which can be controlled individually using the Corsair iCUE software. The lighting is fluid, vivid, and most importantly, it is done in an even manner as I did not observe any spill over and it is bright enough not to be disturbed from the surrounding lights.

Our review sample has Samsung B-Dies so you can expect utmost performance from it. The package is standard monolithic 78-ball FBGA. Die Density is 8 Gb B-Die (20 nm) with a composition of 1024M x8 (64Mn x8 x16 banks).

This kit is XMP 2.0 certified with 16-18-18-36-54 at 1.35V using 3200MHz frequency. This kit has only one XMP profile stored on it. It is pertinent to mention here that Corsair is not using Samsung B Die chips exclusively on these kits meaning, your kit could have other manufacturers’ chip.

Before moving on to the next section, there is one important design element that needs to be discussed. These kits have in-built thermal sensors which is too good a decision on the Corsair! The manufacturer of these sensors is Seiko Instruments. The model of the sensor is S-34T04A which is enabled by default. Its temperature accuracy is rated at B-Grade with temperature resolution of 0.2500°C (10-bit ADC). It has support for negative measurements and interrupt capability.

RGB Lighting and iCUE:

Before proceeding to our testing section, let’s talk about the digital RGB lighting effects on this kit as this is a primary aspect of these modules in addition to the performance. As mentioned above, there are 10 RGB LED lighting zones under the diffuser. Each zone can be controlled individually using the iCUE software.

I have faced issues as iCUE was not detecting the kit. Even my attempt on Intel-based PCs was futile. Since I was concerned about testing it on the AMD system, I had to figure out the issue to make the kit work. I am using the Asus Strix X470-F motherboard. The BIOS was updated to the latest 4207 version. I ended lowering it to 4202 version and by using the most updated iCUE version, the software detected the kit and kept me going. I am mentioning this so that if anyone having a similar issue could try this solution in addition to whatever has worked for other users.

Let’s take a look at the iCUE and see what it offers to the user. The main interface is split into multiple sections. The left side has the action options for the connected devices. The top side has a Home, Dashboard, Instant Lighting, and Settings menu. Under the Devices, the detected ones will pop up. Vengeance RGB Pro can be seen in the detected list. The bottom has a picture welcoming the user to the iCUE.

Clicking the connected device will load its further options. I selected the Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Review as it was the only Corsair device on the test bench. The right side pane is showing the picture of the DDR4 module along with the temperature readings.

As I mentioned above that these kits have built-in thermal sensors from Seiko Instruments and the only iCUE can read from these sensors at the moment as I tried with the AIDA64 and HWInfo64 but both did not show any option regarding this sensor. Keep in mind that HWInfo64 shows the memory thermals regardless of the built-in sensors. Under Default Profile, we have the following options to interact with to control almost every aspect of the memory:

  • DIMM Setup
  • Lighting Effects
  • Timings
  • Graphing
  • Notifications

DIMM setup allows the user to visually set up the memory based on dual-channel or quad channel motherboard configuration and the no of the installed modules. This is a handy implementation for sure and Corsair has my praise for it.  Under DIMM layout the user can select from the shown configurations depending upon the no of DIMMs. I opted for 2 X 4 DIMM Layout as I am using 2x8GB configuration.

Lighting control is at the heart of the iCUE as it gives total control to the users in terms of what they want to do with the kit at hand. iCUE is filled with a plethora of lighting modes which the user can use without any hurdle to easily select the desired effect. The effects have been divided into three broader categories:

  • Predefined
  • Custom
  • Lighting Link

Each of these categories has provided modes. Total modes are as follow:

  • Rainbow Wave
  • Spiral Rainbow
  • Rainbow
  • Color Shift
  • Color Pulse
  • Color Wave
  • Rain
  • Visor
  • Sequential
  • Marquee
  • Temperature
  • Static Color
  • Multi-Color
  • Type Lighting

A few of the modes have fewer control options like Spiral Rainbow has only speed and direction of lighting flow control whereas others have;

Color shift lets the user to either select two colors and alternate between them or uses Random colors. The Rain and Sequential modes also give Direction control. Temperature mode will detect the CPU’s sensor and will let the user declare three temperature categories and assign each category a distinct color which will then be applied if the thermal condition is met.

How to control each LED zone individually?

If you are particularly interested in how to change the individual LED zones on the Vengeance RGB Pro then Multi-Color option under Custom is the option you are looking for. You will see LED # from 1 to 10 and each number has its own box below. The user can select any color from the color palette or define one using hex code or combination etc. User convenience and flexibility is written all over the iCUE options. The Timings options will show the loaded timings on the memory.

Clicking at the Settings menu will show the memory related setting on the top and software related settings at the bottom. This is where the brightness can be controlled of the memory. I wish they have also provided the brightness control under the Lighting tab. The firmware of the memory is also shown.

The software asked me to update the firmware version but I did not update the firmware for my own reason. The General settings will let the user change the temperature reporting unit, restart the iCUE service, enable debug logging, enable/disable startup at windows login, check for the software update etc.

Sensor Logging will allow you to select the sensors which you want to monitor the telemetry of. I am particularly showing the sensor options of both modules in the select. OSD allows the user to enable the selected parameters to be displayed in the OSD.

All in all, the Corsair iCUE is one heck of a complete software that gives the user total control over the connected Corsair devices and to color coordinate and sync the lighting effects on multiple Corsair devices.

Here are a few of the lighting pictures. These don’t serve the purpose truly but would still give you a hint of the brilliance that Corsair has;

Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Testing:

Since this kit has been sponsored for our AMD test bench so it is tested on AM4 with the following configuration:

  • AMD Ryzen 7 2700X
  • Asus Strix X470-F Gaming
  • Asus ROG Ryujin 360
  • Asus ROG Strix GeForce RTX 2080
  • Adata XPG SX950U 250GB
  • Antec HCP 1300
  • Primochill Praxis Wetbench

The kit has been tested using AIDA64 Extreme and SiSoftware Sandra suite. XMP was loaded for the tests. APU Frequency was kept at 100MHz. The kit was overclocked manually using the voltage regulation. With XMP the DRAM timings and Voltages were verified as per the manufacturer’s rated specification.

The BIOS version 4207 is used. The Asus motherboard on the test bench supports maximum frequency of 3466MHz (OC). This kit overclocked to 3466MHz without changing the timing. It seems like a walk in a park for this kit. I am sure this kit could do more than just that. I could not go beyond the 3466MHz the motherboard did not support it and the system was stuck in boot loop. I was able to reduce the timings to 14 CAS using 1.380V and 3466MHz which is an amazing performance. For comparison, I have included another digital RGB RAM from ADATA. It is XPG Spectrix D41 with 2666MHz.

AIDA64 Memory benchmark has shown that there was 7.57% performance boost in Read speeds when the Corsair kit was overclocked to 3466MHz. 8.32% performance boost was observed in the Write speeds. 7.98% performance boost is reported in the Copy speeds. Remember that infinity fabric on AMD Ryzen loves lower latencies and higher transfer speeds.

With tightened timings, the latency was improved to 61.7ns coming from 68.3ns on XMP and tested timing. The performance boost was also observed in the SiSoftware Sandra Memory Bandwidth tests.

Above is a picture of the kit at various speeds and timings.

Conclusion:

The Corsair has ventured into a digital RGB lighting solution on their ever popular DDR4 memories and has launched the Dominator Platinum RGB kits and the Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro Review . Both types are high-performance kits with vivid, fluid and amazing lighting solution. We have taken a spin on their Vengeance RGB Pro 16GB kit as Corsair was kind enough to sponsor our AMD test bench which we have recently set up with the help of AMD, Asus, Corsair, and Antec.

Our future contents will have test results from both platforms (Intel and AMD). The Vengeance RGB Pro are available in multiple of 8GB modules starting from 16GB and going as high as 128GB featuring the tested speeds of 2666MHz (minimum on any kit) and going all the way up to mouthwatering 4700MHz speeds.

These kits feature the Intel XMP 2.0 and have a 288-pin layout for the DDR4 type memory. SPD speed on our sample is 2133MHz with SPD timing of 15-15-15-36. Tested speed on the kit is 3200MHz (PC4-25600) with tested timing of 16-18-18-36 at 1.350V. The Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro comes in two colors; white and black. I have tested the black color.

Our review sample is using Samsung B-Dies which makes them offer utmost performance. The package is standard monolithic 78-ball FBGA. Die Density is 8 Gb B-Die (20 nm) with a composition of 1024M x8 (64MB x8 x16 banks). These kits have black color PCB with ICs on both sides indicating that standard PCB is being used for all capacities.

Our kit is a single-sided one. It has 4 Samsung chips each of 1GB on the left side of the PCB and same 4 chips on the right side. As is the case with the DDR4s, there is no chip in the center of the PCB. There is a single thin thermal pad running on the entire length of the heat spreader on the non-populated side whereas the populated side has cut-to-size thermal pads on each chip. The ICs are handpicked and monitored to ensure better performance with extended stable overclocking. Corsair is not exclusively using Samsung chips on these kits hence your kit could have other manufacturers’ chips as well.

The dimension of a module is 142x45x7mm (LxHxW). The total height of a module is 50mm including the 288-pin connector. It is 45mm without the exposed PCB and connector. You would need to keep in mind the height of a module with respect to the CPU cooler as there is no point if the RGB enabled modules are blocked or hidden under the cooler. The heat spreaders carry a bold yet pleasant design. They are made of anodized aluminum. The heat spreaders are not covering the entire length of the PCB.

There is a translucent diffuser on the top which runs across the entire length of the PCB. The first distinct feature of this diffuser is the layered design as it has 5 layered design to it which looks that good in person. The middle portion is recessed as compared to the left and the right sides.

On the exterior ends, the diffuser has a sharp angular design which is covered by the heat spreader. This is the only area on the top where the heat spreader can be seen. Corsair has given maximum exposure to the lighting and surprisingly, there is no Corsair branding on the diffuser from any side. All that you would get from the top is fluid lighting.

These kits have in-built thermal sensors which is too good a decision on the Corsair! The manufacturer of these sensors is Seiko Instruments. The model of the sensor is S-34T04A which is enabled by default. Its temperature accuracy is rated at B-Grade with temperature resolution of 0.2500°C (10-bit ADC). It has support for negative measurements and interrupt capability.

There are 10 RGB LED zones under the diffuser which can be controlled individually using the Corsair iCUE software. The heat spreader on both sides has perforations on the top facing opposite to each other. Lighting comes out of these perforations as well. Speaking of the RGB lighting effect, these kits pack stunning and vivid lighting effects with fluid and even flow of light.

I would give the Corsair a credit as they packed 10 ARGB LEDs in such a small size area which has enabled them to give user a truly visual experience that speaks for itself and is not easily influenced from the light coming from the surrounding areas as this was my keen observation when I reviewed the D41 kit from ADATA.

Least to say I am impressed with the lighting solution on the Vengeance RGB Pro. This is what I would expect from Corsair to deliver. iCUE allows the users to color coordinate and sync the RGB devices from the Corsair in a single interface. It provides a plethora of lighting modes that the user can use. iCUE can be used to monitor the thermal sensor reading right from memory. Definitely a great feature. Thanks, Corsair for thinking of this.

At present, Easetec is selling Vengeance RGB kits. With RAM prices coming down, this price is a damn killer deal enabling the user to experience the truly immersive lighting at 3200MHz using CL16. In terms of performance, I was able to push this kit to 3466MHz using CAS 14 at 1.380V. I am sure this kid could do much better as I was struck with maximum supported frequency on the AMD Ryzen platform.

I am thankful to the Corsair and Easetec for giving us the opportunity to review the Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16GB 3200MHz black kit. This kit will now be used and featured in all contents coming from AMD based test bench.

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Corsair RAM reviews from buyers and masters, which model is better to choose

  • Reviews

  • About RAM

  • Corsair

Samsung

QUMO

A-Data

Transcend

Apacer

Corsair

Kingmax

Drawbacks:

They are not here

Comment:

on the ASRock x 370 GAMInG x motherboard and the Ruzan 7 1700 processor it ran up to 3600 but it works stably only at 3400. from the beginning it didn’t work out to drive it . .. already and nerves. tired of dancing with a tambourine. and then I think dike I will stick it in other slots in 2 and 4 and to my surprise through XMP 2.0 stupidly put first 2800 then 3000 and away we go as they say. In short, I’m very happy…

Advantages:

fastworks with AMD

Drawbacks:

expensive

Comment:

Ver 5.39Works stably with Ruzin on 3200 Motherboard Asrock AB350 Pro4 (Bios version 3.0)

G

Advantages:

all is good

Drawbacks:

Not yet

Comment:

Excellent operative, the norms work, everything seems to be fast, although well, I still have an i7-6700k

A

Advantages:

Works

Drawbacks:

Not cheap for 2*8 GB

Comment:

It started on the z370 chipset, at the base frequency of 2133, in the BIOS I set it to 2600 so far, the voltage did not change 1. 2. Everything is fine, though one of the coolers of the processor or case began to spin faster, that is, a little noise was added, the difference in tests with ddr3 is almost 2 times.

G

Advantages:

all is good

Drawbacks:

Not yet

Comment:

Excellent operative, the norms work, everything seems to be fast, although well, I still have an i7-6700k

Advantages:

This is Corsair

Drawbacks:

— There is not

Comment:

Which time I take their memory, and never had any problems with it. Works stably, fulfills all the promises.

Z

Advantages:

Personally, I have no marriage Stability of work

Drawbacks:

the price is not right at the moment

Comment:

Bought in the spring of 2018. (I managed to buy before the rise in prices for the operative, now I took the figs for that kind of money). There are no questions about work, I put it in and flew.

Advantages:

what are the disadvantages if 3400 in Ryazan is easy for her

Drawbacks:

They are not here

Comment:

on the ASRock x 370 GAMInG x motherboard and the Ruzan 7 1700 processor it ran up to 3600 but it works stably only at 3400. from the beginning it didn’t work out to drive it … already and nerves. tired of dancing with a tambourine. and then I think dike I will stick it in other slots in 2 and 4 and to my surprise through XMP 2.0 stupidly put first 2800 then 3000 and away we go as they say. In short, I’m very happy…

A

Advantages:

Works

Drawbacks:

Not cheap for 2*8 GB

Comment:

It started on the z370 chipset, at the base frequency of 2133, in the BIOS I set it to 2600 so far, the voltage did not change 1. 2. Everything is fine, though one of the coolers of the processor or case began to spin faster, that is, a little noise was added, the difference in tests with ddr3 is almost 2 times.

Z

Advantages:

Personally, I have no marriage Stability of work

Drawbacks:

the price is not right at the moment

Comment:

Bought in the spring of 2018. (I managed to buy before the rise in prices for the operative, now I took the figs for that kind of money). There are no questions about work, I put it in and flew.

Advantages:

what are the disadvantages if 3400 in Ryazan is easy for her

Drawbacks:

They are not here

Comment:

on the ASRock x 370 GAMInG x motherboard and the Ruzan 7 1700 processor it ran up to 3600 but it works stably only at 3400. from the beginning it didn’t work out to drive it … already and nerves. tired of dancing with a tambourine. and then I think dike I will stick it in other slots in 2 and 4 and to my surprise through XMP 2.0 stupidly put first 2800 then 3000 and away we go as they say. In short, I’m very happy…

A

Advantages:

Works

Drawbacks:

Not cheap for 2*8 GB

Comment:

It started on the z370 chipset, at the base frequency of 2133, in the BIOS I set it to 2600 so far, the voltage did not change 1.2. Everything is fine, though one of the coolers of the processor or case began to spin faster, that is, a little noise was added, the difference in tests with ddr3 is almost 2 times.

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  • 3
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  • 5
  • . ..
  • 7

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Test & Review: Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB White 16 GB DDR4-3600 — Premium Memory White

Page 1: Test & Review: Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB White 16 GB DDR4-3600 — white premium memory modules

Corsair listens to the opinion of users, and now the popular Dominator Platinum RGB line is available with a white heat spreader. If you are building a collection with white components, then you can easily purchase the corresponding trims in the Dominator line. They look really stylish, below we will look at performance.

Corsair has been very active in the memory segment for many years, producing modules for laptops and desktop gaming computers. Corsair’s range includes both expensive Dominator trims and more budget Vengeance trims.

The new Dominator Platinum RGB White modules are available in different versions. For tests we received a 16 GB kit (2x 8 GB) at 3.600 MHz — CMT16GX4M2C3600C18W. But this 2x 8 GB kit can also be purchased in 3.200 MHz CL16, 4.000 MHz CL19 and 4.800 MHz CL18 versions. 32 GB (4x 8 GB) kits available in 3.200 MHz CL16, 3.600 MHz CL18 and 4.000 MHz CL19. There is another option with two 16 GB sticks, 3.200 MHz CL16 and 4.000 MHz CL19 kits are available here. A 64 GB kit (4 x 16 GB) is available with 3.200 MHz CL16 and 3.600 MHz CL18 brackets. Finally, the 128 GB kit (8 x 16 GB) is only available in the 3. 200 MHz CL16 variant.

The new Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB White memory sticks look good not only in performance but also visually. Appearance is a matter of taste, but new modules will find their fans. The workmanship is at the usual high level, here we have no significant complaints. Is that the golden accents look too much. Perhaps black or silver screws would fit in better with the overall style. They are just used for black slats. But, again, this is a matter of taste.

In any case, the Dominator Platinum RGB White trims will stand out beautifully from any other modules on the store counter. And in the system, they provide additional decoration with customizable RGB lighting.

SPD Programming and Technical Specifications

Using the CPU-Z and Thaiphoon Burner utilities, you can get quite detailed information about the memory specifications, which will be very useful for assessing overclocking potential.

Of course, we will try to overclock the memory bars during our tests. But first, let’s take a look at the technical specifications of the modules in Thaiphoon Burner. DIMMs are peer-to-peer, containing 8 chips on one side of 8Gb (1GB) each. The chips are made by Micron Technology E-Die 19 nm. SPD and Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) data are programmed correctly.

Manufacturer and model
Capacity 16 GB (2 x 8 GB)

The heat spreader bars are 55mm high, so it is recommended to check compatibility with the CPU cooler before purchasing the DIMM. If the cooler hangs over the DIMM slots, there may be a conflict with the heat spreaders.

Backlight

The Corsair Dominator Platinum may not boast the popular B-Die chips, but they offer impressive backlight. The well-known Capellix LEDs produce very beautiful shades, and with the help of the Corsair software, various effects can be achieved. However, if the effects are not needed, you can turn on the static backlight on the Corsair Dominator Platinum modules, it will also look good.

There are 12 different effects for the slats, which can then be adjusted individually. The big advantage of Capellix LED is the low power consumption during operation. As a result, RGB modules can also be used for overclocking, LEDs will not lead to the need to set a higher voltage. As a result, Capellix LEDs not only look nice, but also give RGB modules a slight advantage in terms of overclocking compared to competitors.

Subscribe to the Hardwareluxx VKontakte and Facebook groups, as well as to our Telegram channel (@hardwareluxxrussia).

RAM is an integral part of any computer, so you won’t be able to work or play without it. But how to choose a fast and reliable memory? What volume will be enough? What to look for when choosing a memory? In this guide, we will answer these questions and more, and help you choose the best memory modules. Our guide will be interesting not only for beginners, but also for experienced users.

<>Test & Review: Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB White 16 GB DDR4-3600 — White Premium Memory Modules
Benchmarks

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Best RAM in 2020

Looking to upgrade? We have tested and assembled the best DDR4 RAM for gaming PCs.

RAM allows your computer to be efficiently distributed between tasks. In particular, good DDR4 RAM speeds up the launch of new applications, thereby reducing the waiting times and freezes that often occur on slow computers. Choosing RAM is not an easy task given that it is available in a variety of speeds and form factors.

For streamers and multitasking users, RAM plays one of the most important roles in a PC. In this article, we will list the best RAM modules that will give you the best performance. Below is RAM from major manufacturers such as Corsair, G.Skill and Ballistix.

1. Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB 32GB DDR4-3200MHz

Best-in-class performance with innovative RGB 9 backlight technology0704

Speed: DDR4-3200MHz | Timings: 16-18-18-36 | Latency: 16 | Voltage: : 1.35V | Modules: : 2x16GB

Pros:
– Ultra-bright Capellix RGB LEDs
– Improved iCUE software
– Dominator DHX heat spreaders

Cons:
– Memory module height can cause problems with compactness again

3 outperforms Corsair9 with new

3 Dominator Platinum RGB. The original DDR4 kit has long been our favorite high-end memory kit. Its sleek looks, DHX cooling technology, and unrivaled performance have made it a flagship for years to come. Now the iconic Dominator Platinum is back with a new design and new Corsair Capellix LED technology.

Dominator Platinum RGB has the same best-in-class performance as the original, but has higher clock speeds and 12 individual Capellix RGB LEDs. The new LEDs are brighter and more efficient than their predecessors. Combined with Corsair’s powerful iCUE software, the Dominator Platinum combines excellent RGB lighting with high performance.

The price is not too different from the original model, but you will still pay more than some of the other RAMs mentioned in this article.

2. G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32GB DDR4-3600MHz

Best RAM for gaming with AMD motherboard

Speed: DDR4-3600MHz | Timings: 18-22-22-42 | Latency: 18 | Voltage: : 1. 35V | Modules: : 2x16GB

Pros:
— High-speed and large RGB kit
— Optimized for AMD

processor builds

Cons:
— Thick heatsink
— Missing RGB control software

G.Skill’s Trident Z RGB RAM comes with gorgeous, tasteful RGB lighting. The Neo series is optimized for AMD Ryzen builds, making it the perfect choice for PCs with Ryzen processors.

The 32GB G.Skill Trident Z Neo Kit costs less than $200 and you can easily upgrade to 64GB in the future. The Trident Z Neo comes in a variety of frequencies and configurations from 2600MHz to 3800MHz. Each module is equipped with five individually addressable RGB LEDs.

3. G.Skill Trident Z RGB 16GB DDR4-2400MHz

Superb performance RGB backlighting

Speed: DDR4-2400MHz | Timings: 15-15-15-35 | Latency: 15 | Voltage: : 1.2V | Modules: : 2x8GB

Pros:
— Beautiful RGB patterns
— Same size as non-RGB models

Cons:
— No custom lighting profiles

G. Skill’s Trident Z RGB is one of the best exquisite implementations of RGB backlighting that we have ever come across. The kit is illuminated by five individual RGB LEDs and a frosted diffuser that creates a soft glow that looks fantastic on any computer.

Memory performance is as good as it looks, Trident Z available speeds from 2400 to 3600 and more. Overclocked performance matches the original Trident, and with overclocking you can squeeze out a couple more hundred MHz. The Trident Z RGB line is worth considering for any build.

4. Ballistix Tactical Tracer RGB 32GB DDR4-2666 MHz

Customizable RGB

Speed: DDR4-2666MHz | Timings: 16-18-18-36 | Latency: 16 | Voltage: : 1.2V | Modules: : 4x8GB

Pros:
— Detachable 3D printable lightbar
— Robust RGB software

Cons:
— RGB software doesn’t work on X99 platform

If you want to enhance and beautify your PC, the Ballistix Tactical Tracer RGB series from Crucial will suit you. Available in 16GB to 64GB configurations at 2666MHz and 3000MHz, the latest Ballistix DDR4 memory fits a wide range of builds at no extra cost. The main draw here is the 16 RGB LEDs with eight controllable zones and an easy-to-remove light bar that diffuses and amplifies RGB effects.

Crucial provides free 3D files that allow you to print different light bars to create aesthetics in any build. In addition, you can remove the light bar completely for a dazzling effect. The Ballistix Tactical Tracer RGB provides a customization not found in the Trident Z RGB G.Skill series, and when you see the advanced software and features that come with the Ballistix kit, you’ll immediately know it’s the best choice for PC modders.

5. G.Skill Ripjaws V 16GB DDR4-2400MHz

Reliable and affordable DDR4 RAM for the average user

Speed: DDR4-2400MHz | Timings: 15-15-15-35 | Latency: 15 | Voltage: : 1. 2V | Modules: : 2x8GB

Pros:
— Decent price
— Great overclocking potential

Cons:
— Minor stability issues at higher speeds

G.Skill Ripjaws V is the second generation of DDR4 memory from G.Skill, and it is clear that the company has listened to the feedback and criticism from customers. The new series is more affordable, faster and with a less sticky heatsink. Ripjaws V 16GB is the best option for a compact build that will showcase great performance. The

Ripjaws V immediately excelled in our tests without any overclocking, beating several 2400MHz kits. You will be able to overclock to 2800-3000 MHz with a simple power surge. However, it is possible to overclock to 3200 MHz or higher, although you will probably run into some stability issues. When it comes to value for money, the G.Skill Ripjaws V is hard to beat.

6. Patriot Viper Elite 8GB DDR4-2400MHz

Budget option for those who don’t need a lot of RAM

Speed: DDR4-2400MHz | Timings: 15-15-15-35 | Latency: 15 | Voltage: : 1. 2V | Modules: : 2x4GB

Pros:
— Inexpensive upgrade
— Easy overclocking

Cons:
— Possible problems with compactness when using large CPU coolers 9The 0013

Patriot Viper Elite 8GB isn’t the cheapest DDR4 RAM you’ll find, but it’s the best value for money on a budget in our opinion. This dual-channel kit is priced below competitors such as the HyperX Fury and Corsair Vengeance LPX, but offers a similar level of performance. And unlike cheaper RAM, the Viper Elite has great heatsinks and overclocking capability.

For those who want to take full advantage of the Viper Elite, a simple overclock boosts its performance to the level of much more expensive models. One of the great things about DDR4 is that it typically runs at 1.2V, and even the slightest boost in voltage can give you more clock speeds while still being cooler than DDR3. We easily reached 2800 MHz and 3000 MHz, but this is not the limit.

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How to choose a USB stick?

The USB key is an integral part of modern life — it is one of the most convenient drives. USB storage devices are suitable for students due to their low cost, professionals for their security features, and anyone else who just needs somewhere to store certain data. But US

Documents, photos, videos, movies, music — for storing files of various formats, flash drives are used , which are compact electronic storage devices. Our online store offers a huge selection of flash drives for data storage, differing in memory size, design, module type, read / write speed.

Flash drives — which one to choose?

Flash Drive Silicon Power Ultima U03 Sleek design with classic simplicity. The case of the drive resembles sparkling crystal edges and is equipped with a retractable connector for user convenience.

Flash Drive Samsung Series Bar Plus is a new generation drive with impressive speed. With a striking design, the flash drive fits comfortably in the hand, and its metal body is the epitome of minimalism, which harmoniously combines style, speed and durability. A durable metal case keeps your data safe and secure, while a built-in lanyard eyelet prevents accidental loss.

USB stick with code lock is ideal for storing very important information. Flash drive with DataLock technology will provide reliable protection of your data from other users.

USB Flash Drive Corsair Flash Drive Voyager 256 GB USB 3. 0 for fast file transfers and a patented water-resistant rubber housing to help keep those files safe.

USB 3.2 stick — Lightning with a two-way interface will allow you to quickly exchange information between your computer and smartphone.

Buy USB drive at the best price

In Pigu.lt online store at a good price you will find a large selection of flash drives from such well-known manufacturers as ADATA, Apacer, Corsair, Good Ram, Intenso, Imro, Integral, Kingston, Kioxia , Lexar, Lexon, Philips, Platinet, Samsung, Sandisk, Silicon Power, Transcend, Toshiba, Verbatim and many others. The range includes flash drives of various designs, differing in memory capacity and data transfer speed. It is possible to deliver goods to the specified address anywhere in Lithuania. You can pick up goods at pickup points in Vilnius and other cities without additional delivery charges.

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The most important components of computers and their functions

You don’t have to be skilled IT experts to understand that a computer is made up of various components that somehow ensure the smooth operation of this device. Each part of the overall system is responsible for certain functions, on which the capabilities of the computer also depend, therefore, choosing a new unit

How to choose random access memory (RAM)?

In order to ensure that the computer works flawlessly, it is important to carefully select each component of this system. If you want efficiency, you need to pay attention not only to the processor, but also to one of the most important components responsible for performance — random access memory (RAM).
Operative

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What determines the speed of the computer and how to increase it?

Computer freezes or pages loading too slowly cause inconvenience to every user. To avoid this, before buying a new computer or trying to speed up the old one, it is important to find out what determines the speed of the computer.
Factors that affect the speed

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When choosing a computer, many people ask the question: RAM — what is it? How to choose the right random access memory (RAM)?

RAM (RAM ) — computer memory, which is responsible for the speed of data transfer between the user and the processor. RAM memory is one of the most important parts in the system unit.

Features of RAM:

The purpose of RAM is to store information currently used by programs. The operating speed of RAM is hundreds of times faster than that of a hard disk. One of the features of RAM is temporality — it can store information as long as the power source is on. When the computer is turned off, all information is erased. There is only one exception — «hibernation», when all RAM information is written to a special temporary file on the hard disk. When you turn on the computer after the “sleep mode”, you will be able to see open programs, videos, music, documents, and you will be able to continue the work you have started.

Type of RAM

It is very important to note that the RAM must be matched to the main board. Today there are 4 types of RAM on the market:

  1. DDR — the old type, is practically no longer produced.
  2. DDR2 — old type, used very rarely.
  3. DDR3 is one of the most used types today.
  4. DDR4 is the latest type recommended for new processor models.

The amount of RAM and its value

The amount (amount) of RAM (RAM) has a direct impact on the operation of individual programs and the system. The more RAM, the less the system will need to send requests to the hard disk. The system will run faster, there will be no slowdown.

For example, you decide to play a computer game. When the game loads, you will see its menu, which means that the data from the hard drive has been transferred to the RAM memory. Next you will work directly with the RAM memory. The game levels and your player profile will be loaded. If the amount of RAM is insufficient, each stage of the game will be accompanied by unpleasant pauses.

The same thing happens when you work with programs. The amount of RAM determines how many documents you can work with and how many pages in the browser you can open at the same time.