Ddr2 pairs: windows vista — Do I need to upgrade DDR2 Ram in pairs?

windows vista — Do I need to upgrade DDR2 Ram in pairs?


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Modified
12 years, 11 months ago


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3k times

I’m running Vista64 on a AMD64 dual core, with only 1GB of ram.

Do I need to install DDR2 ram in pairs?

My Motherboard:

Manufacturer    ASUSTeK Computer INC.
Model   M2N-E SLI
Version 1.XX
Serial Number   123456789000
North Bridge    NVIDIA nForce 570 SLI Revision A1
South Bridge    NVIDIA nForce 570 SLI Revision A1
CPU AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 3800+
Cpu Socket  Socket AM2 (940)
Memory Summary  
Maximum Capacity    4096 MBytes
Maximum Memory Module Size  1024 MBytes
Memory Slots    4

Current Memory:

Memory Summary
Maximum Capacity    4096 MBytes
Maximum Memory Module Size  1024 MBytes
Memory Slots    4
Error Correction    None
DRAM Frequency  251. 2 MHz
Memory Timings  4-4-4-8 (CL-RCD-RP-RAS)
Device Locator  Slot 1
Manufacturer    OCZ
Part Number OCZ25331024VDC-K  
Capacity    512 MBytes
Memory Type DDR2 (PC2-4300)
Speed   266 MHz (DDR2 533)
Supported Frequencies   266.7 MHz
Memory Timings  4-4-4-8-16 at 266.7 MHz, at 1.8 volts (CL-RCD-RP-RAS-RC)
Data Width  64 bits
EPP SPD Support No
XMP SPD Support No
Device Locator  Slot 2
Manufacturer    OCZ
Part Number OCZ25331024VDC-K  
Capacity    512 MBytes
Memory Type DDR2 (PC2-4300)
Speed   266 MHz (DDR2 533)
Supported Frequencies   266.7 MHz
Memory Timings  4-4-4-8-16 at 266.7 MHz, at 1.8 volts (CL-RCD-RP-RAS-RC)
Data Width  64 bits
EPP SPD Support No
XMP SPD Support No
  • windows-vista
  • upgrade
  • memory






2

You can run SIW, it will tell you make and model of your mainboard.

Post this information here … or look it up at www.crucial. com yourself.






2

That’s primarily dependent on your motherboard. You need to find the specs for your motherboard as it varies widely.

Running in pairs isn’t required on any consumer level DDR1 or later system. IIRC it hasn’t been required since the p1 or 486 era. If your ram isn’t installed in pairs there will be a performance hit because the CPU will spread data across both sticks of ram that is in pairs doubling the transfer rate. On some older controllers you might force all your ram access into single channel mode.

The performance hit from doing this is smaller than what will happen if you run out of ram and are swapping though; and isn’t something you’re likely to notice outside of benchmarks.

The price difference between buying a single large dimm and a pair of smaller ones is typically negligible, so if you’re buying new you should generally go with pairs. But if you have a spare dimm sitting around not doing anything else there’s no reason not to install it.









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ddr2 — memory DIMMs work individually, but not in pairs



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Asked


Modified
10 years, 6 months ago


Viewed
1k times

I have four new (to me) sticks of Kingston 1Gb 400Mhz DDR2. Three of them boot fine individually in slots 1 or 3, but not in slots 2 or 4. The fourth does not boot in any slot.

The three working ones do not boot in any combinations of slots.

Working combinations:

1234 (channel numbers)
1000
0010

Non-working combinations:

1234 (channel numbers)
0100
0001
1100
0011
1010
1111 (naturally, as one stick seems duff)

However, with my old memory, a single 1Gb 667Mhz DIMM, the computer will boot no matter which channel I put the DIMM in. Any combinations of new and old also fail to boot.

Motherboard:
Gigabyte GA-M52L-S3P
gigabyte page. Page 15 of the manual (pdf) says that both DS/SS are useable in the usual 1&2 or 3&4 pairs, or in all four slots.

My question is similar to Can’t get memory sticks to work together, except that even combinations of known-good DIMMs do not work, and similar to Memory works fine separately, but not together, except that I can’t boot the faulty stick to change the BIOS settings for it.

  • memory
  • ddr2
  • dual-channel






3

Motherboard issue. If the RAM is known working (i.e. all RAM tests OK in slot 1, 1 at a time), then it’s the motherboard

The most likely explanation is that some of the motherboard timing or voltage parameters in the BIOS setup were altered from their defaults to optimize performance with the old RAM. Prior to changing RAM hardware, those settings should be returned to their defaults.









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DDR2 SDRAM — Useful Knowledge Base

DDR2 SDRAM is a faster version of DDR RAM. It is using differential pairs of signal conductors. This ensures faster, interference-free signaling and higher throughput.

DDR2, like DDR, has a double data rate. However, the modified signaling method allows higher clock rates to be achieved with greater protection against crosstalk between signals. Additional signals required for differential pairs are added to the pin. A DDR2 DIMM has 240 pins, which is more than 184 DDR pins. The original DDR specification does not officially exceed 400MHz (although faster unofficial overclockers have been created). Whereas DDR2 starts at 400 MHz and reaches the official maximum of 1.066 MHz. nine0003

JEDEC started working on the DDR2 specification in April 1998 and published the standard in September 2003. Production of DDR2 chips and modules actually started in mid-2003 (mostly samples and prototypes), and the first DDR2-enabled chipsets, motherboards, and systems appeared for Intel-based processors in mid-2004.

At the same time, variations of DDR2 SDRAM for graphic cards began to appear, for example, G-DDR2 (Graphics DDR2). In 2005, in systems based on Intel processors for DDR2, support for the motherboard chipset appeared. nine0003

It’s important that during 2005 AMD distinguished itself by the lack of DDR2 support, whose Athlon 64 and Opteron processor families included integrated DDR memory controllers. AMD-based processors first began supporting DDR2 with the release of socket AM2 motherboards and processors in mid-2006. (AMD Socket F, otherwise known as 1207 FX, also supports DDR2 memory.)

Please note that AMD, in its transition from DDR to DDR2, is almost two years behind Intel. This is due to the fact that AMD, instead of adding a memory controller to the northbridge of the chipset, as in more traditional Intel designs, has inserted a memory controller into the Athlon 64 itself and all subsequent processors. nine0003

While there are advantages to integrating the memory controller into the CPU, one of the disadvantages is that new memory architectures cannot be quickly adopted, as this requires socket and processor redesign.

However, with the release of the Core i-series processors in 2008, Intel also moved the memory controller from the chipset to the processor, thus putting Intel in the same situation as AMD in terms of memory architecture.

In addition to higher speed and bandwidth, DDR2 SDRAM has other advantages. It uses a lower voltage than conventional DDRs (1.8V vs. 2.5V), so power consumption and heat dissipation are reduced. Due to the higher pin count required for DDR2 chips, the chips typically use a package (FBGA) rather than the thin small package (TSOP) used by most DDR and conventional SDRAM chips. FPGA chips are connected to the substrate (memory module in most cases) using tightly spaced solder balls on the base of the chip. nine0003

The table below shows the various official JEDEC approved DDR2 module types and throughput specifications.

JEDEC Standard DDR2 (240-Pin DIMM) Speeds and Transfer Rates

Module Type Chip type Base clock Cycle time Cycles over time Bus speed Tire width Data rate module Dual — channel Baud rate
PC2-3200 DDR2-400 200MHz 5. 00ns 2 400MTps 8 bytes 3,200MBps 6,400MBps
PC2-4200 DDR2-533 266MHz 3.75ns 2 533MTps 8 bytes 4.266MBps 8.533MBps
PC2-5300 DDR2-667 333MHz 3.00ns 2 667MTps 8 bytes 5.333MBps 10.667MBps
PC2-6400 DDR2-800 400MHz 2.50ns 2 800MTps 8 bytes 6,400MBps 12,800MBps
PC2-8500 DDR2-1066 533MHz 1.88ns 2 1.066MTps 8 bytes 8.533MBps 17.066MBps

DDR = Double Data Rate
MHz = Million cycles per second
MTps = Million transfers per second
Mbps = Million bytes per second
NS = Nanoseconds (billionths of a second)

Fastest official JEDEC approved , the standard — DDR2-1066 consists of chips operating at an effective speed of 1. 066 MHz (actually, megatransfers per second). As a result, the modules are designated as PC2-8500 with a throughput of 8.533 Mbps. nine0003

However, as with DDR, many DDR2 SDRAM manufacturers produce even faster modules designed for overclocked systems. They are sold as modules with unofficial designations and performance figures that exceed standard ratings. The following table shows popular unofficial speed ratings.

Attention . Since the speeds of these modules exceed the standard defaults, unless you are overclocking your system, you will not see the benefits of using them. nine0003

Overclocking Module (non-JEDEC) DDR2 (240-pin DIMM) Speeds and Transfer Rates

nine0027 750

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Module standard Chip type Clock Speed ​​(MHz) Cycles over time Bus speed (MTps) Bus width (bytes) Transfer rate (MBps) Dual channel — transmission rate (Mbps)
PC2-6000 DDR2-750 375 2 8 6,000 12,000
PC2-7200 DDR2-900 450 2 900 8 7. 200 14.400
PC2-8000 DDR2-1000 500 2 1000 8 8,000 16,000
PC2-8800 DDR2-1100 550 2 1100 8 8,800 17.600
PC2-8888 DDR2-1111 556 2 1111 8 8.888 17.777
PC2-9136 DDR2-1142 571 2 1142 8 9.136 18.272
PC2-9200 DDR2-1150 575 1150 8 9.200 18.400
PC2-9600 DDR2-1200 600 2 1200 8 9.600 19.200
PC2-10000 DDR2-1250 625 2 1250 8 10,000 20,000

DDR = Double Data Rate
MHz = Million cycles per second
MTps = Million transfers per second
Mbps = Million bytes per second
NS = Nanoseconds (billionths of a second)

You will typically find DDR2 modules rated between CL 3 and CL 6

AMD Socket AM3 DDR2 vs.

DDR3 Memory Testing / Processors and Memory
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3DNews Processors and memory Comparative testing Comparative testing of DDR2 memory and…


Which RAM is best for AMD Socket AM3? How does overclocking and changing memory timings affect overall system performance? Let’s try to figure it out

One of the most interesting technical features of the AMD Phenom II AM3 processors is the universal memory controller. This controller is designed to work with both DDR2 memory on AM2+ systems and DDR3 memory on AM3 systems. Naturally, the question immediately arises — which system is faster? We will try to answer it in the framework of this review.

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For a perfect comparison of the performance of the memory subsystem, a single test platform is needed, on which only the memory modules themselves will change. It is very easy to ensure the identity of the test processor, power supply and video card. The search for a motherboard with simultaneous support for DDR2 and DDR3 memory turned out to be much more difficult. Ultimately, it was unsuccessful and we settled on two motherboards from the same manufacturer.

These are the M4A79 Deluxe and M4A79 modelsT Deluxe, manufactured by ASUS. Both are based on the same chipset (AMD 790FX), both have an almost identical PCB design, with the only significant difference being support for different memory standards. This is exactly what we need.

Now a few words about test modules. We used three kits: Corsair DDR2 TWIN2X2048-8500C5 modules defended DDR2 honor, and DDR3-1066 Qimonda and DDR3-1600 A-Data AD31600X001GU kits were their rivals.

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It is worth emphasizing that the name of the modules and their nominal clock frequency are often weakly related to reality. For example, when installing Corsair modules, any AM2+ motherboard set as standard not the maximum DDR2-1066 operating mode, but quite moderate DDR2-800. For testing motherboards, these are just ideal conditions, but today we have the task of identifying the fastest system, which involves manually setting the memory frequency.

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By the way, some readers may ask why the motherboard does not set the highest frequency. Here you need to take into account several interesting points. First, a lower frequency expands the range of compatible memory modules, which ultimately increases the sales of this board. However, this doesn’t always work. In particular, the M4A79 Deluxe board refused to start when very good G.Skill F2-6400CL4D-2GBHK modules were installed. And secondly, a higher memory frequency does not guarantee a higher level of performance. The fact is that along with an increase in frequency, working timings (or delays) increase. This leads to speed gains in some applications, but also slowdowns in others. Moreover, the performance of some applications does not depend on the memory latency and its bandwidth at all.

Let’s take an example. When installing Corsair modules, M4A79 boardDeluxe sets the following timings: 5-5-5-18-22-2T. When increasing the memory frequency to DDR2-1066, the timings increase to 5-7-7-24-30-2T. These modules are capable of working at tighter timings, but ASUS is reinsured. A similar picture is observed on the AM3 platform.

At the stock DDR3-1066 frequency, the working timings of Qimonda modules are 7-7-7-20-27-1T, and after increasing the frequency to DDR3-1333, the board sets the timings to 9-9-9-25-34-1T. As a rule, timings are written in SPD and may differ for different modules. So, when setting the DDR3-1333 frequency on the A-Data modules, the board sets the timings to 9-9-9-24-33-1T (almost like on Qimonda), but when the frequency is lowered to DDR3-1066, the timings are reduced to only 8-8-8-20-27-1T (for Qimonda, respectively, 7-7 -7-20-27-1T).

Now let’s go directly to testing. Initially, we only wanted to compare three configurations: DDR2-800, DDR3-1066, and DDR3-1333. The choice is explained by the fact that these frequencies are standard for the AMD platform, and the results of the comparison will be of interest to the vast majority of users. However, to delve deeper into the issue, we added some more configurations. Firstly, this is the frequency of DDR2-1066. It is standard, but with a small feature: at this frequency, only two memory modules can work in the system (one module per channel). We also note that DDR2 RAM modules have been produced for a long time, the technological process is already well optimized, and high-quality modules (i.e. overclockers) are quite cheap. This is a big plus for a system with an AM2+ processor.

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By the way, at the present time, the difference in price for conventional DDR2 and DDR3 modules is practically insignificant. But if we compare the cost of overclocker modules, then the situation is not so happy for fans of DDR3. In addition, impressive statistics have already been collected on overclocker DDR2 modules, which cannot be said about similar DDR3 modules.

Thus, we believe that finding DDR2 modules capable of operating at DDR2-1066 frequency with optimized timings is not a problem, just as it is not a problem to find modules operating at DDR2-800 frequency with minimum timings. And it turned out that Corsair memory modules fit these requirements perfectly. Note that we are already talking about memory overclocking, i.e. on the operation of modules in modes not provided by manufacturers. Accordingly, you need to overclock the DDR3 memory. And here we were a little disappointed — Qimonda modules were unable to master the DDR3-1600 frequency, so we had to use A-Data modules. Moreover, when setting the DDR3-1600 frequency, the motherboard M4A79T Deluxe overestimated the timings so much that the first tests showed a significant drop in performance relative to DDR3-1333. So we had to increase Vmem to 1.88V (stock = 1.5V) and manually tighten the timings.

The following equipment was used in the test system:

nine0027 2x 1024 MB Corsair DDR2 TWIN2X2048-8500C5

2x 1024 MB Qimonda DDR3-1333

2x 1024MB DDR3-1600 A-Data AD31600X001GU

Test equipment
Processor AMD Phenom II X3 720 (2. 8 GHz; Deneb core)
Cooler Gigabyte 3D Cooler GP Edition
Video card ASUS 8800 GT (GeForce 8800 GT; PCI Express x16)

Driver version: 180.48 WHQL
Sound card
HDD Samsung HD160JJ
Memory
Power supply FSP 550W
OS MS Vista

First, let’s look at the results of synthetic tests.

Application software tests.

Data compression (WinRAR) was measured in kb/s, i. e. more is better.

Video encoding (DivX, Xvid) measured in seconds, i.e. less is better.

Now — tests of game programs.

Conclusions

If you look at the performance graphs from afar, there is no difference between the performance of memory modules of different frequencies and different standards. Upon closer examination, several significant points can be noted. First, DDR3 is the preferred memory type for regular users. Moreover, the optimal ratio of frequency and timings is achieved in the modes provided by the manufacturer (ie DDR3-1066 for Qimonda and DDR3-1333 for A-Data).

Secondly, increasing the frequency from DDR3-1066 to DDR3-1333 is accompanied by an increase in timings and increased delays «steal» a potential performance boost, so in the end the system works at the same speed. Thirdly, if the user is at least slightly familiar with memory settings, then he can configure a system with DDR2 in such a way that it will be as fast as a system with DDR3-1066. This result can be achieved in two ways: by seriously lowering the timings at DDR2-800, or by increasing the frequency to DDR2-1066 at medium timings. In these two cases, the RAM operates in normal modes, does not require an increase in the Vmem voltage, but forces the user to manually set the working timings.

And, finally, a conclusion for computer enthusiasts and overclockers — the highest performance on the AMD Socket AM3 platform is achieved when using DDR3-1600 memory with low timings. Accordingly, we are talking about rather expensive overclocker memory modules, which often require good compatibility with the motherboard and a fairly significant increase in the supply voltage (Vmem). In addition, the DDR3-1600 mode is non-standard (i.e. overclocker), and some motherboards may either not support it, or this mode is implemented «for show». Moreover, the potential of this mode (i.e. the HTT frequency and the corresponding memory multiplier) is revealed in two cases. Firstly, this is work in professional multi-threaded applications that require a large memory bandwidth, and in a multi-core system (currently AMD has a maximum of four cores).

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