Graphic card ram size: Why Do Graphics Cards Have Memory?

Why Do Graphics Cards Have Memory?

If you’re shopping for a new graphics card, you must’ve noticed that there’s always a “Memory” spec on the box. Moreover, a single graphics card model often comes with multiple memory sizes. But why do graphics cards have memory if you already have plenty of RAM in your computer?

Graphics cards have memory to store rendered frames and provide the GPU with fast access to essential data. The image on the screen is always held on the frame buffer, which is a part of the memory. Textures, shadows, and depth buffers are also stored in the graphics card memory.

This article will explain why graphics cards have memory, how it affects performance, how much graphics card memory you need for gaming, what shared GPU memory is, and whether you can upgrade memory on your graphics card.

Why graphics cards have memory

There are a few good reasons why graphics cards don’t rely solely on your system RAM. 

VRAM is often faster, more easily accessible, has more bandwidth, is easier to optimize to work with, etc.

Let’s take a closer look to understand why graphics cards come with built-in memory.

Graphics cards use the memory to store graphics data

Your graphics processing unit (GPU) does thousands of calculations every second to display a crystal-clear image onto the screen.

The data required for the calculations must be stored somewhere. Unfortunately, your primary storage (SSD/HDD) is too far and way too slow to be useful.

All data required to render a frame goes from your primary storage disk to RAM. The CPU recognizes the data is for graphics, so it’s sent to your VRAM. That’s where it sits until it’s required.

Textures are the perfect example of vital graphics data. Without textures, your games would look like a bunch of random geometric shapes with no immersion quality to them.

Everything from grass and stones to various elements of your gun is a texture glued onto a 3D model.

You can think of video game textures as thousands of high-resolution images. Originally stored in the game folder, textures must stay in your VRAM for easy access when required.

Here are a few other examples of data stored in your VRAM:

  • Z-buffer (depth)
  • Shadow maps
  • Vector graphics
  • Mesh
  • Shaders

Rendered frames are stored in the memory

Your GPU takes the data from the Z-buffer, adds shadow maps to it, does all the required shading, etc.

Once a frame is completely finished, it has to go somewhere. Of course, you see it on your screen, but the monitor only displays the image. 

The frame is stored within a special part of the graphics card memory called the frame buffer. New frames are constantly overwriting the old ones to achieve a smooth image.

You can even change the number of pre-rendered frames in the graphics card drivers’ settings. 

It’s usually only one frame, but setting it to two or three may improve performance in some cases (or make it worse in others).

Graphics cards use a special type of fast memory (VRAM)

Video random-access memory (VRAM), in its broadest sense, is similar to your system RAM. 

All data stored in VRAM is temporary, so it’s a type of cache used by your GPU to hold large amounts of data required for graphics.

VRAM is usually much faster than traditional RAM.

More importantly, it’s very close to the GPU physically. It’s soldered directly onto the graphics card PCB.

This allows for super-fast data transfer with minimum delays, making high-resolution graphics possible.

VRAM differs in size, speed, and bus width on modern graphics cards. 

More VRAM means it can store more data. Faster VRAM allows for faster data transfers and, consequently, better performance.

Lastly, the bus width determines the maximum available bandwidth. Think of it as a chokepoint between your graphics card memory and your GPU.

There’s also a particular type of VRAM called high bandwidth memory (HBM). A stacked layer of memory sits on a controller die that transfers data to the GPU through a layer of silicon.

HBM allows for small form factor graphics cards, faster data transfer rates, lower power usage, etc.

Does a graphics card memory size matter?

Graphics card memory size matters because it affects GPU’s performance. Not having enough memory on your graphics card limits the resolution size, textures, shadows, and other graphics settings.

Let’s use a simple analogy to help better understand how graphics cards work. Your GPU is like the engine in a car, and the graphics card memory is the passenger space.

You can only go as fast as the engine, but you can cram in more passengers if you have a larger car. This improves efficiency, meaning you can bring more people with you for the trip.

Similarly, the performance of your GPU affects how much FPS you can get at certain graphics settings. 

If you have plenty of VRAM, you can allow the GPU to render frames at a higher resolution, bump up texture quality, increase details, etc.

You’re still restricted by the GPU’s power, though. So, it’s best to look at the graphics card model first, then VRAM size.

More VRAM means you won’t experience constant stutters when the graphics card loads an asset from your RAM or storage disk.

Assuming your GPU can handle it, you need sufficient VRAM space to bump up the texture settings, shadows.

Even the most powerful GPU on the market can’t run games smoothly if it doesn’t have enough VRAM to store assets.

How much graphics memory do I need for gaming?

You need a minimum of 4 GB of graphics memory for 1080p gaming. 6 GB is ideal if you want to set texture quality to High or Ultra. For 1440p gaming, 8 GB – 12 GB is sufficient to run games at medium-high settings. 4K gaming requires at least 12 GB of VRAM for decent texture quality.

In general, more VRAM is always better. If we’re talking about the exact GPU model, always aim for the model with more VRAM if the price is similar.  

You’ll probably get better FPS, less stutter, and you can set Textures to Ultra with a minimum performance loss.

If you’re only playing eSports titles, you could even get away with a 2 GB graphics card at 1080p

But any modern AAA title fills up 2 GB very quickly, and VRAM usage can even go over 6 GB in some instances. 

Gaming at 1440p is more demanding because there are more pixels on the screen. The higher-resolution frame takes up more space inside the frame buffer.

4K resolution is even more demanding. You already need a powerful graphics card to play games at 4K. 

If your graphics card came with less than 10-12 GB of VRAM, don’t even consider 4K gaming unless you want to upscale the resolution.

Upscaling allows you to preserve a lot of VRAM space because it uses special textures that are made to look like they’re high-resolution.

If you want to game at 8K, you’ll probably need over 20 GB of VRAM to store the enormous frame.

Can you upgrade graphics card memory?

Graphics card memory cannot be upgraded because it’s soldered onto the PCB. The circuit board design predetermines the maximum memory size on a graphics card. If a manufacturer decides to increase memory size on a graphics card, the memory chip dies are doubled.

Technically speaking, you could desolder all memory chips on your graphics card and replace them with chips that have twice the memory.

However, this is very risky, expensive, and difficult.

So, there is no practical way of upgrading the memory of your graphics card.

Soldering the memory onto the PCB allows manufacturers to optimize the data transfer rate between the GPU and the memory chips.

But you shouldn’t concern yourself too much about VRAM size in the first place. Both AMD and NVIDIA do a lot of careful planning to decide how much VRAM they’ll put onto their graphics cards.

It wouldn’t make any sense to combine a low-end GPU with a bucketload of VRAM.

How much VRAM they can put is predetermined by the memory bus size

For example, if a graphics card has eight 512 MB chips to achieve 4 GB of VRAM, the manufacturer must replace the 512 MB chips with 1 GB units to upgrade the VRAM to 8 GB.

They usually don’t mix and match memory sizes and speeds for this reason.

What is shared GPU memory?

Shared GPU memory is virtual memory that’s located on your system RAM. Your graphics card uses shared GPU memory when it runs out of VRAM space to store assets required to process graphics. Shared GPU memory is significantly slower than VRAM, so it’s only used when necessary.

Ideally, your graphics card will never use shared GPU memory. However, you can easily tell that your graphics card runs on shared GPU memory. As a result, you’ll get visible jitter, textures load very slowly, etc.

You can also turn on the performance metrics in some games or via your graphics card driver to track VRAM usage. 

If the VRAM usage is at 100%, your graphics card will start running on shared GPU memory.

In that case, lower the resolution, texture quality, shadow quality, or some other graphics settings. As a result, you’ll eliminate stutter and various graphical artifacts.

If you’re running on an integrated graphics card, your computer doesn’t have any VRAM. 

Instead, your GPU is running exclusively on shared GPU memory.

In that case, there isn’t anything that you can do to improve performance, aside from overclocking.

Does GPU memory matter?

GPU memory matters because more VRAM allows your graphics card to store high-resolution frames, more detailed textures, and other assets. More GPU memory doesn’t always mean higher FPS, but it allows for a smoother, more consistent experience, especially at high graphics settings.

When buying a new graphics card, pay attention to VRAM size. You don’t want to waste money on more VRAM when you don’t need it because your monitor is 1080p.

On the other hand, not having enough VRAM will seriously affect overall performance. This is because you need enough VRAM to store the outgoing frame, along with all graphics assets.

Ultimately, if the price between different VRAM sizes isn’t enormous, always go for the one with more VRAM. It’s a way to make your computer more future-proof.

Even if a modern game can’t occupy all the VRAM today, that won’t be the case in a couple of years. 

Assets, especially textures, are constantly increasing in size drastically.

GPU Memory vs. RAM

GPU memory, often called VRAM, and system RAM has many things in common. First, they’re both random-access memory, which means you can write and read any type of data to them.

However, VRAM is often split into several chunks that store different things. For example, frame buffers, depth buffers, shadow maps, textures, mesh, and other assets are all stored in VRAM.

Your system RAM temporarily stores all the data your CPU needs or may need soon. In addition, the programs and files that are being used are held in RAM.

For example, all Chrome tabs are stored in RAM, allowing lightning-fast switching between tabs.

VRAM speed is determined by GDDR (or HBM) version, memory bus width, and frequency. Speaking of frequency, VRAM easily reaches speeds of 10,000 – 15,000 MHz.

RAM is much slower. Clock speeds usually range between 2400 – 6400 MHz, depending on the DDR version and clock speed.

Moreover, the maximum data transfer rate is much higher for VRAM.

Final thoughts

Graphics cards have a special type of random-access memory called VRAM. VRAM comes in the form of memory chips soldered directly onto the graphics card to allow fast transfer rates.

Your graphics card needs VRAM to store the outgoing frame. It also holds textures, mesh, shadow maps, 3D depth information, and other assets that your GPU accesses frequently.

Having memory on the graphics card instead of using system RAM provides several advantages. 

VRAM is much closer to the GPU, it’s much faster, and it’s optimized to work with your GPU, improving overall performance.

How much GPU memory do I need?

Digital Trends may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site. Why trust us?

By

Matthew Connatser

Just like your PC has memory (called RAM), a dedicated GPU will have its own memory, called VRAM (video RAM). And just like RAM, not having enough VRAM can cause performance problems. How much you have will depend on what GPU you have, and how much you need will depend on the applications you use.

Contents

  • What’s the difference between system RAM and VRAM?
  • Gaming
  • Productivity
  • Should I be worried about having very high memory usage?

So, the definitive, vague answer to how much GPU memory do you actually need, is: It depends.

What’s the difference between system RAM and VRAM?

System RAM and VRAM are very similar: They both come in relatively small capacities and they’re really fast. But they’re not quite the same, because system RAM is meant for CPUs and VRAM is meant for GPUs, and these two different processors have very different needs. System RAM has very low latency (which is good) but has comparatively low memory bandwidth. Meanwhile, VRAM has extremely high memory bandwidth with much higher latency. It just comes down to the fact that CPUs need low latency more than they need high bandwidth, and vice versa for GPUs.

Another key difference between system RAM and VRAM is upgradeability. It’s trivial to upgrade system RAM — you just plug in a new stick or replace an existing one. But VRAM is not user upgradeable (outside of extreme hardware modification with a soldering iron). This means whatever GPU you buy, you’re stuck with however much memory it has.

This isn’t some kind of design oversight or the case of GPU manufacturers wanting you to buy a whole new GPU each time. The real reason is that GPUs can only be paired with certain amounts of RAM, depending on memory bus width. CPUs can tolerate pretty crazy RAM configurations, but GPUs can’t.

Gaming

If you’re a gamer, good news: Gaming GPUs tend to be designed pretty sensibly. Whatever VRAM is on your GPU is probably all that you’re going to need. There might be some cases where having more memory would be beneficial, but AMD, Nvidia, and game devs are pretty good at using hardware and software tricks to conserve memory. Besides, it’s much more likely the actual GPU itself is going to reach the end of its rope before you need more VRAM.

There are some exceptions, though. Some games aren’t optimized very well, meaning you’ll have to play with graphics settings to get decent performance, and if you’ve ever modded a game like Skyrim, you’ve probably seen graphics mods that say you need a GPU with lots of VRAM. In these cases, having a higher-end GPU might be necessary because they don’t usually put lots of VRAM on lower-end GPUs. However, there is the RTX 3060, which has an insane 12 GB of VRAM, just like the RTX 3080 Ti, and its $329 MSRP puts it firmly in the midrange.

Only the latest AAA games running with everything turned up to ultra at 4K resolution demand anything close to that much VRAM, and even then, you’d need a super high-end card, so making sure your GPU is current and as high-end as you need and can afford is more important than worrying about VRAM.

Productivity

Professional work done with professional software like AutoCAD or Adobe Premiere Pro will likely demand more VRAM than most games. But just like gaming GPUs, workstation GPUs often come with amounts of VRAM that makes sense, and across the board, you’ll find that these kinds of GPUs tend to have more VRAM than their gaming counterparts, at least at the high end. AMD’s top-end PRO W6800 is equipped with 32 GB of memory, while Nvidia’s RTX A6000 has 48GB, which is certainly overkill for most users.

According to Nvidia’s Professional Solution Guide, modern GPUs equipped with 8GB to 12GB of VRAM are necessary for meeting minimum requirements. However, you can probably get away with less VRAM. Adobe Premiere Pro’s minimum requirement for VRAM is 2GB, and 4GB to 6GB is recommended. Autodesk AutoCAD’s “basic” spec calls for 1GB of VRAM but recommends 4GB.

It’s ideal to have more memory than you need, and this is especially important for GPUs since you can’t upgrade the VRAM. Based on recommendations from companies like Nvidia and Adobe, you’ll want at least 4GB for light work, and finding a current-generation or older GPU with 4GB shouldn’t be too hard. If your job is to edit videos in Premiere Pro or to make models in Autodesk Maya, then you’re definitely going to want to spend more to get a GPU with at least 8GB of VRAM, even if it’s not current-gen.

Should I be worried about having very high memory usage?

Most people have probably looked at Task Manager or some other monitoring software and have seen almost all their VRAM in use while gaming or doing work. It’s understandable to be concerned about that, but unless your performance is lower than expected and GPU memory usage is consistently at 100%, there’s no need to be worried. Your GPU is smart and using that memory for a reason.

The thing about memory usage is that the name is misleading. Task Manager isn’t showing you all the data currently being used, it’s showing you all of the memory being occupied by data. That might seem like the same exact thing, but it’s not. GPUs can swap data in and out of memory when needed or keep data in memory just in case it’s needed later.

However, if you actually run out of VRAM, your PC is going to grind to a halt. If you’re gaming, you can expect massive frames-per-second drops, or if you’re trying to edit a video, you’ll notice scrubbing through the timeline is suddenly less responsive.

Editors’ Recommendations
  • The best Mac games for 2022

  • The best mouse for Mac 2022

  • MacBooks vs. Windows laptops: Here’s how to choose

  • The best 4K gaming laptops for 2022

  • The best mini-ITX PC cases for 2022

How Much VRAM Do You Need For Gaming? [2022 Guide]

There are many factors to consider when buying a new graphics card, and one of the most important ones is VRAM. But is VRAM relevant today? Let’s find out.

Answer:

In 2022, 4 GB of dedicated VRAM should be the bare minimum to aim for in graphics cards.

However, 8 GB is now the standard for most GPUs and that’s what you should aim for if you want a future-proof graphics card and/or if you intend on getting a 1440p or 4K monitor.

VRAM, which is short for video RAM, is the dedicated memory that a GPU uses to store and access graphics data. In 2022, it is one of the most important specs on any graphics card’s spec sheet, so how much of it do you really need?

In this guide, we’ll share with you a simple and clear answer to that question, so read on!

Conclusion

All in all, 4 GB is the bare minimum for gaming in 1080p in 2022, while 6-8 GB should be the goal for most people who want to run games in 1440p or in 4K, or just those who want something more future-proof.

However, these are just generalizations. The GPU’s processing power is much more important when selecting your ideal graphics card. 

That said, if you’re shopping for a new GPU, best check out our selection of the best graphics cards in 2022.

Is A 144Hz Monitor Worth It For Gaming?

How to Choose a Graphics Card 2022

Next to the central processing unit (CPU), the graphics processing unit (GPU) has the most impact on a gaming PC’s performance. The GPU consists of an additional processor that takes data from the CPU, and translates it into images that can be rendered on your display. In other words, when you’re playing a game, the GPU is doing most of the heavy lifting.

The more powerful the GPU (sometimes referred to as a graphics card) the more information can be calculated and displayed in a shorter time, and the better your gameplay experience will be overall.

In the early days of PCs, the CPU was responsible for translating information into images. The data was maintained in special memory spaces called “frame buffers,” and was then transferred to the display. Many general-purpose CPUs didn’t excel at performing these kinds of processes, and so “graphics accelerators” were created to handle some of that specialized work that the CPU was undertaking. This became more important as graphical user interfaces (GUIs), found in more modern operating systems such as Windows, became more popular.

Today’s GPUs are very good at processing large amounts of image information and performing parallel tasks, making them incredibly fast at not only displaying text and graphics in windowed GUIs, but also at processing the complex 3D graphics required for modern gaming experiences. GPUs can also efficiently run other processes that involve manipulating lots of data in parallel, which makes them useful for some applications outside of gaming as well.

GPUs are important, but how do you know which one to choose? There is a wide selection of GPU options available from a variety of manufacturers, and it might not be immediately clear which best fits your needs. Knowing the basics of how they operate and the differences between them can help make that decision easier.

The guide below should help when choosing the right graphics card. After you know what you’re looking for, you can head over to Newegg’s GPU page to pick out the best one for your needs.

Prices and availability of products discussed were accurate at time of publication, but are subject to change.

Why does your graphics card matter?

For many people, gaming is the most hardware intensive task that you will ask your PC to perform. It’s no surprise, then, that serious gamers spend hours researching the latest GPU technology, and they often upgrade their GPUs on a regular basis. As GPUs get faster, games are designed to take advantage of the extra performance, and that pushes manufacturers to make even faster GPUs, continuing the cycle.

If you’re not prioritizing gaming, then you might not care as much about your GPU’s capabilities. That said, professional applications often make direct use of a GPU’s specialized processing capabilities, just in different ways. Examples include video editing, where a GPU can be used to speed up processes like video encoding, 3D rendering, and computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications like AutoCAD. All these programs benefit from the additional processing power of a GPU, though they benefit most from GPUs designed specifically with these applications in mind.

Choosing a GPU is, therefore, an important part of building, buying, or upgrading a PC. As with every PC component, the first question to ask yourself when choosing a graphics card is: how will you be using it?

Gaming

The gaming industry has been instrumental in the evolution of GPU technology. Today’s PC games are more realistic and complex than ever before, and the increasing performance of modern GPUs is both part of the reason why, and a response to gamers demanding better-looking and more complex games.

Simply put, if you’re building a PC to play games, then the GPU will be your most important purchase. Other components can also impact performance, such as the CPU, storage, and RAM, but the GPU has the most direct connection to what you see on screen when playing.

There are many kinds of games, though, and not all of them demand the most powerful GPU on the market. That’s why it’s important to read a game’s required, recommended, and optimal specifications to make sure that you get a suitable GPU.

Buying the best GPU you can afford is a good way to future-proof your build, and keep it ready to play popular games that have yet to be released. That said, if you know exactly the kind of games you want to play, doing a bit of research on the ideal GPU to run that title is a great way to start your shopping process.

Video and professional applications

Those who use their PCs for complex tasks like 3D rendering, game development, and video editing also benefit from faster GPUs. High-end applications like AutoCAD and Adobe Premiere Pro can make use of GPUs to speed up processing, and make for faster and more efficient workflows.

That’s why there’s an entire segment of GPUs designed specifically for professionals. These workstation GPUs are optimized for these applications, and their drivers are certified to be stable and reliable when undertaking these operations. Professional class graphics cards can be immensely powerful and are often more expensive than even high-end gaming GPUs, but because they weren’t designed specifically for gaming workloads, they probably aren’t ideal for a gaming PC. Therefore, the most expensive GPU isn’t always “better,” and it’s important to pick a GPU based on how you plan to use it, not exclusively based on price.

We’re going to focus on mainstream, gaming-focused graphics cards in this guide. If you need a GPU to run professional applications, you’ll likely be looking outside of the normal consumer GPU market for the best options. Nvidia’s Quadro series, or AMD’s Radeon Pro line are great places to start.

Though professional-grade GPUs are designed for a different purpose, many of the fundamental concepts still apply.

Everyone else

If you aren’t gaming or running demanding professional applications that can use a GPU to speed things up, you might not need to invest as much money in your graphics card. If you’re mainly running productivity apps, browsing the web, managing email, and performing other low-resource tasks, then picking out the right RAM, CPU, and storage should be a higher priority.

The graphics capabilities embedded in your system’s CPU are probably sufficient, and you likely don’t require a separate GPU.

Integrated vs. discrete GPUs

Most modern CPUs have integrated graphics, which are essentially GPUs that are built into the CPU itself, or are otherwise closely interlinked with the CPU. These integrated graphics tend to be lower-performance options, providing enough power to drive the operating system and run web browsers, email clients, productivity apps, and other routine software, but not enough for anything more than casual (or older) games. This is quickly changing as CPUs become more powerful, but for now, if you want to play games, a separate (or discrete) GPU is likely the best solution.

Standalone GPUs range from relatively low-cost, entry-level options all the way up to incredibly powerful GPUs that can cost well over $1,000 all by themselves. You can buy discrete GPUs as part of pre-built systems, for a PC you’re building yourself, or to upgrade an older GPU.

Mobile vs. desktop

Choosing a GPU isn’t just important when you’re building or buying a new desktop PC. Many gaming focused laptop computers utilize discrete GPUs as well. If gaming on the go is a high priority, you’ll want to ensure your laptop has a GPU that’s capable of playing the games you want, and that you aren’t relying exclusively on the lower-power integrated graphics of your CPU.

Laptop GPUs used to be significantly less powerful than their full-sized desktop cousins due to space limitations and thermal considerations. Now they are now closer to parity than ever. Many modern gaming laptops use discrete GPUs that are very close in performance to their desktop equivalents, or are optimized to fit an impressive amount of power into very thin and light notebooks.

You no longer have to choose between portability and power.

Ray-tracing: the latest advancement in realistic graphics

As with most PC hardware, GPU technology continues to evolve at a breakneck pace. A recent example of evolving graphics technology is “real-time ray tracing.” Ray tracing technology allows for more realistic lighting effects that more accurately simulate the way light and reflections behave in the real world.

As Nvidia describes it:

“Ray tracing calculates the color of pixels by tracing the path that light would take if it were to travel from the eye of the viewer through the virtual 3D scene. As it traverses the scene, the light may reflect from one object to another (causing reflections), be blocked by objects (causing shadows), or pass through transparent or semi-transparent objects (causing refractions). All of these interactions are combined to produce the final color of a pixel that’s then displayed on the screen.”

Ray tracing, and other comparable graphics technologies, have been a goal of the computer industry for years now, and it’s only recently that the hardware and software have caught up with that vision. Finally, consumer-grade GPUs have the power to perform effective ray tracing in games. While games are still embracing this technology and it isn’t yet ubiquitous, there’s no doubt it will become the new normal as GPUs become more powerful.

Given it’s a newer technology, GPUs that can efficiently implement real-time ray tracing tend to be more expensive, but it’s likely that costs will continue to decline. Most modern flagship GPUs from AMD and Nvidia support some version of ray tracing, and it will continue to become more widely available with each new iteration of graphics cards.

Ray tracing, and other comparable graphics technologies have been a goal of the computer industry for years now, and it’s only recently that the hardware and software have caught up with that vision. Finally, consumer-grade GPUs have the power to perform effective ray tracing in games. While games are still embracing this technology and it isn’t yet ubiquitous, there’s no doubt it will become the new normal as GPUs become more powerful.

Given it’s a newer technology, GPUs that can efficiently implement real-time ray tracing tend to be more expensive, but it’s likely that costs will continue to decline. Most modern flagship GPUs from AMD and Nvidia support some version of ray tracing, and it will continue to become more widely available with each new iteration of graphics cards.

Upscaling technology: DLSS and FSR

Today’s GPUs include technology that can use upscaling to dramatically improve gaming performance. Simply put, the technology renders each frame at a lower resolution and then upscales it to the resolution set within the game. Methods are used to ensure that the image retains as much quality as possible during the upscaling process. Overall, the technology speeds up the rendering process while still providing a quality image.

Nvidia’s upscaling method is known as Deep Learning Super Sampling, or DLSS. It uses tensor cores that are fast at machine learning computation to examine previous upscaled frames and the current lower resolution frame. From that analysis, DLSS creates a frame that looks like it was rendered at a higher resolution and displays it on the screen. It performs that process for each frame, which thanks to the dedicated hardware is faster than rendering a high resolution image. Note that games must be written to support DLSS.

AMD uses FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR), a simpler process that looks at the current frame and uses a few sharpening filter and edge detection algorithms to create a higher quality image from a lower resolution image. Unlike DLSS, FSR is an open-source technology that isn’t tied to dedicated hardware and can be used on any contemporary GPU. As with DLSS, games must be written to use FSR.

Nvidia vs. AMD

Now then, let’s talk about the two biggest players in the gaming GPU business (at least for now): Nvidia and AMD.

When you’re shopping for a GPU, you’re choosing between graphics cards that include all the components necessary to render an image to your display. These cards include cooling solutions, necessary connections, and most importantly, the graphics processor itself. This processor is an incredibly complex chip developed with decades of research and experimentation. Because the barrier for entry to create these processors is so high, it’s likely that any GPU you buy will have come from one of two companies: Nvidia or AMD.

Historically, these two companies have battled for leadership in the GPU market, constantly forcing each other to innovate to the benefit of consumers. Both have strengths, and both offer solid options. Whichever you choose, you’ll be able to find a card targeted to your gaming needs.

When shopping for a graphics card, you’ll most often be choosing from models made by companies other than Nvidia and AMD, such as ASUS, GIGABYTE, and MSI. These companies take the chips designed by either AMD or Nvidia and create their own graphics card using this technology.

Think of it as a car; the engine is created by AMD or Nvidia, but the rest of the car, including the body and the cooling, are designed by the company that manufacturers the card itself. In other words, if you buy an ASUS GPU, it’s still an Nvidia or AMD chip, in a body designed by ASUS. Each GPU manufacturer brings their own unique design choices and technologies to the table, which results in plenty of options to choose from.

The model of the GPU (for example, an Nvidia RTX 3080) refers to the actual processor itself, and this is what tells you where the GPU falls on the overall performance spectrum. There are other considerations too, such as cooling, clock speeds, and aesthetic design that can impact performance, but if you buy an RTX 3080, you know the fundamental capabilities of the card regardless of the manufacturer.

This is probably the most important factor to consider when making your choice.

Nvidia

Nvidia’s most recent series of gaming GPUs are built on its Ampere architecture. The most popular and powerful GPUs are those in its 30-series, with performance capabilities increasing with the number. Nvidia has a wide range of GPUs covering the low-end to the very high end of the consumer GPU market as well, not only flagship products.

There are many factors that dictate the performance of a GPU, but an easy place to start is with how many processing cores, called “CUDA cores” or “RTX cores,” an Nvidia GPU offers. This is usually a good indicator of its performance capabilities. However, as with most PC hardware, there are a multitude of indicators that factor into performance, and “better” can mean different things to different people.

Nvidia is in the process of developing its RTX 4000 series, codenamed Lovelace, and so far there are only rumors and leaks without any confirmation from the company. The primary speculations are that RTX 4000 GPUs will be faster than the current generation and that they will use more power.

Here are some of the most relevant Nvidia GeForce gaming GPUs as of mid 2022:

 

GPU CUDA Cores RT Cores Tensor Cores Base GPU clock (MHz) Boost GPU clock (MHz) RAM type RAM (GB) RAM bandwidth (GB/s) RAM width TDP (watts)
RTX 3050 2560 / 2304 20 80 1510 1780 GDRR6 8 224 128-bit 130
RTX 3060 3584 28 112 1320 1780 GDRR6 12 360 192-bit 170
RTX 3060 Ti 4864 38 152 1410 1670 GDRR6 8 448 256-bit 200
RTX 3070 5888 46 184 1500 1725 GDDR6 8 448 256-bit 220
RTX 3070 Ti 6144 48 192 1580 1770 GDRR6X 8 608 256-bit 290
RTX 3080 8704 68 272 1440 1710 GDDR6X 12 912 384-bit 350
RTX 3080 Ti 10240 80 320 1370 1670 GDRR6X 12 912 384-bit 350
RTX 3090 10496 82 328 1400 1700 GDDR6X 24 936 384-bit 350
RTX 3090 Ti 10752 84 336 1670 1860 GDRR6X 24 1008 384-bit 450

 

Older generation Nvidia gaming GPUs

 

Desktop
GPU CUDA Cores RT Cores Tensor Cores Base GPU clock (MHz) Boost GPU clock (MHz) RAM type RAM standard config (GB) RAM bandwidth (GB/s) RAM width TDP (watts)
GeForce GTX 1080 2560 N/A N/A 1607 1733 GDDR5X 8 352 256-bit 180
GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 3584 N/A N/A 1480 1582 GDDR5X 11 484 352-bit 250
GTX 1660 Ti 1536 N/A N/A 1500 1770 GDDR6 6GB 288 192-bit 120
RTX 2060 1920 30 240 1365 1680 GDDR6 6GB 336 192-bit 160
RTX 2060 SUPER 2176 34 272 1470 1650 GDDR6 8GB 448 256-bit 160
RTX 2070 2304 36 288 1410 1620 GDDR6 8GB 448 256-bit 175
RTX 2070 SUPER 2560 40 320 1605 1770 GDDR6 8GB 448 256-bit 215
RTX 2080 2944 46 368 1515 1710 GDDR6 8GB 448 256-bit 215
RTX 2080 SUPER 3072 48 384 1650 1815 GDDR6 8GB 495. 9 256-bit 215
RTX 2080 Ti 4352 68 544 1350 1545 GDDR6 11GB 616 352-bit 250

AMD

AMD also has a lineup of powerful gaming GPUs, including their flagship Radeon RX 6000 series, which utilizes the RDNA 2 architecture and is a successor to the AMD RX 5000 series. The RX 6000 series ranges from the entry-level RX 6400 up to the high-end RX 6950 XT.

Note that AMD’s term for its GPU cores is “Stream Processors,” and again the more, the better.

Here are AMD’s latest GPUs as of mid 2022:

GPU Compute Unites Stream Processors Boost Frequency (MHz) RAM type RAM standard config (GB) RAM bandwidth (GB/s) RAM width TDP (watts)
Radeon RX 6400 12 768 2321 GDDR6 4 128 64-bit 53
Radeon RX 6500 XT 16 1024 2815 GDDR6 4 144 64-bit 80
Radeon RX 6600 28 1792 2491 GDDR6 8 224 128-bit 132
Radeon RX 6600 XT 32 2048 2589 GDDR6 8 256 128-bit 160
Radeon RX 6650 DT 32 2048 2635 GDDR6 8 280 128-bit 180
Radeon RX 6700 XT 40 2560 2581 GDDR6 12 384 192-bit 230
Radeon RX 6750 XT 40 2560 2600 GDDR6 12 432 192-bit 250
Radeon RX 6800 60 3840 2105 GDDR6 16 512 256-bit 250
Radeon RX 6850 XT 72 4608 2250 GDDR6 16 512 256-bit 300
Radeon RX 6900 XT 80 5120 2250 GDDR6 16 512 256-bit 300
Radeon RX 6950 XT 80 5120 2310 GDDR6 16 576 512-bit 335

Older generation AMD gaming GPUs

Desktop
GPU Stream Processors Base GPU clock (MHz) RAM type RAM standard config (GB) RAM bandwidth (GB/s) RAM width TDP (watts)
Radeon RX 590 2304 1469 GDDR5 8GB 256 256-bit 185
Radeon RX Vega 56 3584 1156 HBM2 8 410 2048-bit 210
Radeon RX Vega 64 4096 1247 HBM2 8 484 2048-bit 295
Radeon RX Vega 64 Liquid 4096 1406 HBM2 8 484 2048-bit 345
Radeon VII 3840 1400 HBM2 16 1024 4096-bit 300
Radeon RX 5700 2304 1465 GDDR6 8 448 256-bit 180
Radeon RX 5700 XT 2560 1605 GDDR6 8 448 256-bit 225

Specifications

As you can see from the charts above, there are a few specifications that you will want to keep in mind as you look to purchase a GPU. Note that the information in the charts represents the design specifications for each GPU, and graphics card manufacturers (such as ASUS, EVGA, and ZOTAC, among others) have tweaked the basic designs to come up with their own performance parameters.

That’s why it’s so important to do your research, including checking out benchmarks at sites like PassMark Software’s videocard benchmarks roundup. These benchmark comparisons will allow you to see how different versions of the same GPU compare to each other, and to other versions.

The following provides a brief discussion of some of the specifications that you’ll likely find during your research.

Thermal Design Power (TDP)

The discrete GPU is often the most power-hungry component in a modern PC. If you’re building or upgrading a PC, then you’ll want to ensure the power supply is sufficient to support the GPU that you want to install.

As with all powerful hardware that uses electricity, GPUs generate a lot of heat, and require sufficient cooling to run reliably and at peak performance. Most graphics cards will include a power supply recommendation, usually with recommended watts (such as 750 watts.) You’ll need to consider how much power is drawn by the other components in your PC as well, and ensure that your power supply is sufficient to support everything in your system.

The combination of how much power a GPU pulls and how much heat it generates is known as “thermal design power or TDP. This measurement is indicated in watts, and that’s the number that you will see in a graphics card’s specifications. The higher the TDP, the more power that’s required to operate the GPU, and the more heat the GPU produces. This can be important in both desktops and laptops, where thermals become a high priority given space constraints.

Note that as you are designing your PC or choosing a GPU upgrade, you will also want to research how hot a given graphics card runs at maximum power. This will help you choose the right cooling system for both your GPU, and the PC itself.

It’s also important to know what kind of power connections a graphics card requires. Usually this is a mix of six-pin and eight-pin connectors, but this can vary. Newer GPUs may have slightly different power configurations, so when upgrading or adding a GPU, you’ll want to ensure not only that your power supply provides sufficient wattage, but also that it has the proper connections to support the power needs of the GPU.

Memory

Discrete GPUs utilize a special type of memory to store the data needed to ultimately display information on a screen. When considering discrete GPUs, you’ll want to consider both how much memory a graphics card has, and how much bandwidth it provides.

The amount of video random access memory (VRAM) in your GPU is important for high-performance games that use large amounts of data to construct the complex images on screen. This is also a factor when running multiple displays, especially if they are higher resolution or refresh rate.

Generally speaking, you’ll get more graphics RAM as you buy faster graphics cards, and so as long as you buy a GPU that’s fast enough for your desired games, then you should have sufficient VRAM.

RAM bandwidth is another important metric to consider as well. The faster the RAM, the faster the GPU can access information and display it on screen. The GPU model generally determines the kind of RAM present in a graphics card, so once again, as you choose the right GPU for your needs, you’ll likely get the right RAM to go with it.

Interface

Today, almost all discrete GPUs plug into PCIe slots, and most make use of 16x PCIe. GPUs vary, in how many physical slots they fill, between single, double, and even triple slot configurations. You’ll need to be sure that your PC’s motherboard has enough room for your chosen GPU. This means you also need to consider any other components that you want to plug in alongside the GPU, especially if they are going to use a PCIe slot.

You also need to ensure your case is large enough to support the components you are installing. While most modern PC cases will support standard gaming GPUs, if you are interested in a Small Form Factor PC, or a particularly large GPU, research the compatibility between your motherboard, case, and graphics card. Insufficient space can result in improper cooling, which can lead to decreased performance.

If space constraints are a concern, there are GPUs designed specifically to have a smaller profile.

Connections

Of course, a GPU by itself isn’t very useful. It needs to connect to a motherboard, and a display, or multiple displays, to function. There are a few different connections used by modern displays, including DVI, HDMI, and DisplayPort. VGA is an older, legacy connection that might still be available on some displays, but is quickly fading into obscurity.

Most modern GPUs support only HDMI and DisplayPort formats, which are pretty much the standard for gaming focused systems and displays. A popular configuration on modern gaming GPUs is three DisplayPort outputs, and one HDMI.

The differences between all the different display connections is a topic deserving of its own article. Suffice it to say you will need to make sure that your chosen graphics card supports enough connections for all the monitors you want to plug into your PC, and that they are the right connections. Note that in many cases you can buy adapters to convert a connection on the graphics card to one that a display can accept, though this can limit access to features like higher resolutions and refresh rates.

You will need to double-check the specifications to make sure a given graphics card can support as many monitors as you want to connect, and that the connections are compatible between your GPU and your displays.

More than one GPU

Some graphics cards can be connected to run in parallel with additional cards, which can provide serious boosts in performance for demanding games. This is called Scalable Link Interface (SLI) for Nvidia, and Crossfire for AMD. If you want to run multiple graphics cards in your PC, then you’ll need to select both the right cards and the right motherboard that supports this technology.

This configuration is not as common as it used to be. Nvidia’s popular 3070 and 3080-series cards do not provide the option for SLI at all, as fewer games support multiple GPUs. If you want wide support for SLI or Crossfire, you’ll want to go with older GPUs. If you do that, you’ll miss out on newer technologies like ray tracing, so consider carefully.

GPUs and cryptomining

It just so happens that GPUs are very fast at performing the kind of computations used in cryptocurrency mining. Because of that, there’s been a long-standing shortage of GPUs as cryptocurrency miners have bought up all available stock to use in massive mining rigs. That made it difficult to buy a GPU and greatly inflated the price. As this story is being updated, cryptocurrency prices have been falling and the GPU shortage has alleviated somewhat.

Buy the GPU that’s right for you

Hopefully you have a better sense of what to look for in a GPU. Now that you know the basics, it’s a good idea to visit Newegg’s GPU section for even more information. You can use Newegg’s comparison tool for a side-by-side list of how different graphics cards compare, which can help you determine the right card for your system.

Another resource to help you choose a GPU and graphics card are the games and applications you want to run. Most will list required, recommended, and optimal specifications, which will often include recommended CPU, the GPU, RAM, and storage.

Survey the games and applications that matter most to you, and make sure that you select a graphics card that will meet at least the recommended specifications.

Enjoy your new GPU!

How much VRAM do you need? Professional and Gaming Workloads explored

Raw clock speeds and processing cores are not the only factors to consider when picking a graphics card.

Ensuring your GPU has access to sufficient VRAM (video memory) for your workloads is equally important.

Hitting the sweet spot will allow you to get both the most performance out of your workloads without spending too much on VRAM capacity that you might not need.

Moreover, as your professional projects’ and modern video games’ VRAM demand will continue to grow in the years to come, you can save yourself the need to upgrade your GPU in the near future when choosing a Graphics Card with ample VRAM now.

As is often the case, the VRAM requirements, too, depend on what you plan on using your graphics card for.

When building a PC for tasks such as video editing, the VRAM requirements of your graphics card can vary depending on the software used as well as your project complexity, making it necessary to identify the best amount of VRAM for your particular workloads.

To help you decide, we’ll be going through the VRAM requirements of popular creative workloads in this guide.

Because VRAM also has a significant impact on gaming performance, we will give a high-level overview of what to look out for in gaming as well.

How much VRAM do You need? An Overview.

For those of you just looking for some quick numbers, here’s our VRAM capacity requirements summary table for different popular workloads.

Be sure to continue reading for in-depth info on how we came about these numbers.

Workload     Recommended VRAM  
Low Medium High
3D Modeling, Animation, and CPU / GPU Rendering Modelling and Animation (Active Workloads) 6 — 8GB GDDR6 8 — 10GB GDDR6/6X 10+GB GDDR6/6X
CPU Rendering (Passive Workloads) 6 — 8GB GDDR6/6X 6 — 8 GB GDDR6/6X 6 — 8GB GDDR6/6X
GPU Rendering (Passive Workloads) 6 — 8GB GDDR6/6X 8 — 16GB GDDR6/6X 24+GB GDDR6/6X/HBM2
Video Editing, Motion Design, Compositing General Video Editing 4 — 6GB GDDR6/5X/5 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5
Video Editing with heavy GPU support, e. g., Davinci Resolve 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5 8 — 16GB GDDR6 16 — 24 GB GDDR6/6X
Motion Design and Composting 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5 8 — 10GB GDDR6 10 — 24 GB GDDR6/6X
Graphic Design 4 — 6GB GDDR6/5X/5 4 — 6GB GDDR6/5X/5 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5
Gaming 1080p 4 — 6GB GDDR6/5X/5 4 — 6GB GDDR6/5X/5 4 — 6GB GDDR6
1440p 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5 6 — 8GB GDDR6/5X/5 6 — 8GB GDDR6
4K 6 — 8GB GDDR6 8 — 10GB GDDR6/6X 10+GB GDDR6/6X

What is VRAM?

The abbreviation VRAM stands for Video Random Access Memory and serves as fast, temporary storage for the graphics processor on your graphics card.

Before the GPU can process a single frame or specific scene, the VRAM holds the textures, models, geometries, and lighting maps at the ready, that the graphics processor then uses to render that particular frame.

After the rendering is complete, the graphics card stores the result in the VRAM as a framebuffer, which is then sent to a video display to output the final image on your monitor.

When we talk about rendering, this really just means processing (maths) of graphical computations that have a visual end-result when put together.

So the GPU is really just doing a bunch of calculations with data the VRAM holds.

A simplified example: To render (create) a visual image in a PC-Game or a 3D-Rendering Software that can then be displayed on the monitor, here’s basically what happens:

  1. The scene Data (Textures, Polygons, Animations, Lights..) is loaded from your Mass Storage into your GPU’s VRAM.
  2. The GPU shoots rays through each pixel
  3. When a ray hits a surface, the GPU looks up what polygons, lights, textures are associated with that pixel. This Data is found in the VRAM.
  4. When the GPU is done checking all pixels for that frame, the frame is finished and can be stored back into VRAM again
  5. The finished frame is displayed on the Monitor (or saved onto disk)

RAM vs.

VRAM: What’s the difference?

The system memory or RAM is an extremely fast, temporary storage in your computer that enables the processor (CPU) to quickly access data needed for processing your workloads. System RAM can be easily upgraded or swapped with different modules.

VRAM is fast RAM that the graphics card processor exclusively uses for tasks like rendering scenes and driving displays.

VRAM is soldered directly onto the graphics card and this proximity to the graphics processor means it can access information from it much faster than it could from the system RAM or attached storage devices.

Because VRAM is soldered onto the GPU’s PCB, it can’t be upgraded or swapped with other modules.

So why does VRAM have to be soldered onto the GPU? Can’t we just create a GPU VRAM Socket where we can swap Ram Modules, like it is done with System RAM on the Motherboard?

The reason this is not possible is, that VRAM is a lot faster than System RAM and a GPU Core does not have the level of Caches (L1, L2, L3) that a CPU has. Put together, this means for the GPU to be able to access the VRAM as fast as possible, and for signal integrity reasons, the VRAM has to be soldered onto the GPU.

Types of VRAM:

There are two types of VRAM that are used on most graphics cards today: GDDR or HBM.

Both GDDR and HBM have undergone several changes over the years, with each new generation bringing improvements in areas like scaled-down node processing technology, memory bandwidth, transistor count, allowing manufacturers to add faster and more processing cores to graphics cards.

Smaller nodes mean you can add more transistors onto VRAM while keeping its size the same. This means higher VRAM capacities at the same size and at lower power consumption.

GDDR

GDDR or Graphics Double Data Rate has long been the VRAM of choice for the graphics card industry, thanks to its similarity to DDR System memory, making it easier and cheaper to manufacture.

Featuring six major and two minor revisions, GDDR saw massive improvements in transfer rates (the amount of data that can be sent or received per second) from the fifth generation onwards, with GDDR6 having double the transfer rate of GDDR5.

Image-Source: Wikipedia

HBM

HBM or High Bandwidth Memory is a type of VRAM that employs stacked memory chips to achieve a smaller form factor than comparable GDDR memory.

HBM is also more power-efficient, thanks to the wide memory bus that helps it transfer data at lower clock speeds.

Image-Source: graphicscardhub

However, with HBM memory modules being more expensive to manufacture, the memory is rarely employed in consumer GPUs, with AMD’s Vega series being the only consumer graphics card to utilize it.

Understanding the memory bus and bandwidth

While a sufficient amount of VRAM is crucial, your graphics card’s performance will strongly depend on the graphics processor’s memory bandwidth. The memory bandwidth depends on the type of memory used, memory bus width, memory clock, and cycles per clock.

To make it easier to understand, you can imagine a line at the ticket counter. The memory bandwidth of the GPU is similar to the number of people that get their tickets in a fixed unit of time, say, a minute.

The memory bus width here is the total number of ticket counters available, so the more, the better, whereas the memory clock can be thought of as the time taken by the cashier to print a single ticket, which remains fixed in our case.

The VRAM is typically split into several memory modules in a graphics card, each having the same capacity. Each memory module will have a fixed number of lanes to the graphics processor.

A lane is a trace on the graphics card PCB, with each one capable of transferring data simultaneously in both directions.

So, if we take the example of the RTX 3080 with a 320-bit bus, we can calculate from the 10GB of GDDR6X VRAM that with each module having a capacity of 1GB, each will have 32 lanes to the graphics processor.

Comparing this to the 192-bit bus of the RTX 3060 with 12GB of GDDR6 memory, we see each 1GB module being allocated only 16 lanes, which serves as a reminder that more VRAM may not always be better.

The memory bus width is the total number of lanes from the processor to all the memory modules over which the memory can transfer the data.

Higher performing cards usually employ a wider bus to achieve a higher memory bandwidth.

The memory clock is another crucial factor at play while calculating the memory bandwidth. Having a higher memory clock increases the bandwidth and can compensate for a smaller memory bus in graphics cards.

Simplified, the math would look something like this:

Memory Bandwidth = Memory Bus Width x Memory Clock Speed

The bandwidth will limit how much of the memory your graphics card will utilize when under heavy loads.

Remember that a higher memory bandwidth might not always guarantee increased performance since the GPU’s processing power to handle the data from the VRAM must also be considered.

What actually uses/fills up my VRAM?

The frame buffer that is used for Monitor-display occupies a tiny amount of the graphic card’s memory, with a 4K HDR image occupying around 50MB of VRAM.

This low consumption is why graphics cards whose only purpose is to drive displays don’t need large amounts of VRAM. (Workloads such as Word-Processing or simple Browsing)

However, when a graphics card needs to render frames for visually demanding tasks, it requires several data buffers that would cover the scene’s texture, lighting, shadows, geometry, among others, which will quickly fill up the GPU’s available VRAM.

Add to this features like Ray Tracing, Anti-Aliasing, complex texture maps, and you will need a considerable amount of VRAM. Working with higher resolutions will also scale up the VRAM requirements.

To summarize: Anything that the GPU needs for processing goes into the VRAM.

Depending on your workloads this can be:

  • Data Buffers, Frame Buffers
  • Textures, Videos (Image-Sequences)
  • Polygons, Meshes, Geometry
  • Lights, Light Caches
  • Ray-Trees
  • Depth Maps, UV Maps
  • Databases

Does more VRAM improve my performance?

So, does increasing VRAM enable a graphics card to render scenes faster? The short answer is yes, but only if you had too little, to begin with.

Your graphics card utilizes VRAM the same way your processor uses the system memory.

When your PC runs out of system memory, the additional data is written to a page file that resides on your SSD or hard disk, which is much slower than the system memory, causing your system to become sluggish and prone to frequent crashes,

The same is true with VRAM, with the difference being that the data is offloaded into the system memory. Due to the System RAM’s distance from the graphics processor, and the many connections and smaller busses it has to traverse to do so, it is much slower for the GPU to access, and this often leads to instability and slowdowns.

In such scenarios increasing the VRAM can show a significant performance improvement since the data now can reside entirely in the graphics card’s memory, making it easier for the graphics processor to access.

Of course, increasing VRAM capacity is only possible by buying a new GPU (or by linking through NVLINK – more on this later).

Although VRAM capacity is important, though, choosing a graphics card based only on VRAM capacity can bottleneck your performance in other ways as many lower-tier graphics cards like Nvidia’s 12GB RTX 3060 marketing stunt makes the RTX 3060 look more attractive and powerful than even higher-tier GPUs with less VRAM. (which it isn’t)

Your best bet is to identify the VRAM and performance requirements for your workloads and choose a graphics card that fits your budget.

VRAM usage across workloads:

So, enough talk. Let’s take a closer look at some popular workloads and their VRAM requirements.

As mentioned before, selecting an excessive amount of VRAM might have no real-world performance benefits, while not having enough could lead to crashes and cripple your performance.

We have combined similar workloads into popular categories based and take a look at their VRAM Requirements:

3D Modeling, Animation, and CPU / GPU Rendering

Getting the most out of your GPU in 3D workloads today depends on whether your scene data, that is needed to render a frame, can fit easily into your GPU’s video memory.

If you run out of memory you will be forced to rely on system RAM, which is slower for graphical tasks.

We’ve categorized usage according to active and passive 3D workloads:

Active workloads

For those building a PC for 3D Modeling or Animation, the graphics card plays a vital role in determining the framerate of your viewport and how smooth your work will feel.

The ideal viewport framerate should be at around 30-60 fps for a smooth experience that allows you to interact with your model without encountering lag.

Since you will render frames in real-time, ensuring your graphics card is equipped with sufficient VRAM is essential.

Based on your scene complexity, polygon count, texture display resolution, and viewport-effects, we recommend starting with at least a 6GB graphics card like the GTX 1660 Super, which hits the sweet spot for price and performance.

If you plan on activating heavy viewport rendering features in Blender’s Eevee or Maya’s Viewport 2. 0, the added shader effects, SSAO, Depth of Field, Bloom, or real-time reflections will make it challenging to work on cards with less than 8GB of VRAM, especially if the scene is of a more complex nature.

If this is you, look into buying at least an RTX 2060 Super or RTX 3060 Ti to be able to continue working with a responsive viewport.

Working at higher resolutions will also lead to higher consumption of VRAM, and at this point, most lower-end 8GB cards will begin to reach their limits.

Image-Source: Techgage

Keep in mind that, similar to gaming, the viewport load is shared between the CPU and GPU at lower resolutions, making the CPU the primary bottleneck.

Image-Source: Techgage

So, upgrading the CPU can give you a significantly larger improvement over increasing the VRAM, especially if your scene already fits nicely into the video memory.

Summary: VRAM requirements for active 3D workloads such as Modeling, Animation, Rigging, Texturing

  • Baseline: A GPU with 6-8GB of VRAM (e. g. GTX 1660 Super)
  • Moderate complexity scenes: A GPU with 8-10GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 3060 Ti, RTX 3070)
  • Highly complex scenes: A GPU with 10+GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 2080Ti, RTX 3080)
Passive / rendering workloads

Offline Final-Render Engines differ in their VRAM consumption from active workloads. We’ve categorized passive rendering into CPU and GPU-based rendering as both have their own set of hardware requirements.

CPU rendering:

Since CPU rendering makes use of the processor’s cores, there is little to no requirement of a graphics card, let alone one with large amounts of VRAM to ensure quick and bottleneck-free rendering performance.

Focusing your budget on buying a CPU with as many cores as possible will ensure that you get the best performance in applications that use CPU-based 3D Render Engines like V-Ray, Corona, or Cinema 4D’s Physical Renderer.

GPU rendering:

While GPU rendering is heavily dependent on your graphics card’s processing power and compute capabilities, ensuring your project fits into the VRAM is essential for the graphics processor to operate at peak performance.

Most GPU-rendering engines like Redshift, Octane, and V-Ray show significant improvements in render times with larger amounts of VRAM, especially with scenes that employ a large number of polygons, high-resolution textures, and complex (GI, Light Cache, Brute Force) lighting.

For simple scenes with low poly models and small resolution textures, running a GPU with 6GB or even just 4GB of VRAM can be sufficient.

If you plan on rendering a more complex scene with higher-resolution textures and many high-poly objects and cloners, we recommend buying a GPU with at least 8GB of VRAM to ensure the scene adequately fits into the graphics card memory and doesn’t have to be offloaded “out-of-core” into the System’s RAM, which slow things down considerably.

Working with higher resolution outputs (e.g. Print-Sized Render-Resolutions) will almost always require you to have a card with a sizeable amount of VRAM as the Render Buffer complexity increases with the number of pixels even for scenes with just average complexities.

For the most complex of projects, you will require a significant amount of VRAM. Nvidia’s prosumer RTX 3090 is a good choice here, coming equipped with 24GB of VRAM.

You could also go for a Quadro card like the Ampere RTX A6000 for the higher VRAM capacity though you spend a considerable amount of money just for more VRAM and not necessarily processing capability.

For render-engines like Chaos Group’s V-Ray that support the following feature, employing Nvidia’s NVLink can allow for VRAM pooling from multiple graphics cards.

Image-Source: Chaosgroup

NVLink lets you render highly complex scenes without the need to buy a single expensive GPU with a high VRAM capacity, especially with Nvidia’s RTX 20-series cards featuring more widespread support for the feature.

Some rendering engines like Redshift employ “out of core” rendering to get around potentially low capacities of VRAM. In Redshift, when a graphics card runs out of memory, the render engine will allocate the system memory instead.

While this comes at a performance cost, some scene data, like textures, will perform similarly when loaded from the System’s RAM, to loading from the GPU’s VRAM.

However, the supported data types are limited, and exceeding the VRAM by a significant amount can cause crashes.

Engines like Octane that do not support the feature will crash due to insufficient VRAM, so depending on your software of choice, it might be better to invest in a powerful enough GPU to prevent any slowdowns.

Summary: VRAM requirements for passive 3D workloads such as GPU Rendering

  • Baseline: 6-8GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 2060 Super)
  • Moderate complexity scenes: A GPU with 8-16GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 3060 Ti, RTX 3080)
  • Highly complex scenes: A GPU with 24+GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 3090, A6000) or multiple GPUs

Video Editing, Motion Design, Compositing

While building a computer for video editing workloads, the VRAM required is highly dependent on the type of software you use.

Video editing applications like Premiere Pro do not make use of GPU acceleration to such an extent that increasing the VRAM would significantly improve performance.

Instead, choosing a graphics card with better processing performance will yield better results.

We recommend buying a graphics card with up to 8GB of VRAM for Premiere Pro, and even a budget consumer GPU should be fine for this workload.

Image-Source: Pugetsystems

Summary: VRAM requirements for Video Editing applications like Premiere Pro

  • A GPU with 4-8GB of VRAM (e.g., GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060 Super, RTX 3070)

For those interested in building a workstation PC for video editing software like DaVinci Resolve or Fusion that make heavy use of your graphics card to function, ensuring you have the right amount of VRAM can significantly improve overall rendering and playback performance.

Running multi-GPUs is possible as well, which can reduce render times even further.

We recommend a graphics card with at least 6-8GB of VRAM and a decent amount of processing power for editing 1080p or 2160p footage on a Full-HD timeline.

If you plan to work with footage resolutions at 4K or greater and need to work with a high resolution 4K timeline, then investing in a graphics card with at least 8GB of VRAM is recommended.

Because DaVinci Resolve makes excellent use of additional VRAM, going with a graphics card with more memory would give you the flexibility to work with higher-res footage and timelines in the future.

Image-Source: Pugetsystems

Summary: VRAM requirements for GPU-dependent Video Editing applications

  • 1080p/2160p footage with FHD timeline: A GPU with 6-8GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 2060 Super, RTX 3070)
  • 4K footage with QHD Timeline: A GPU with 8-11GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 2080Ti, RTX 3080)
  • 4K+ footage with 4K timeline: One or multiple GPUs with 16-24GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 3090, Quadro RTX 6000)

While the system requirements for motion design and compositing software like After Effects heavily favor the CPU and amount of system memory, they use graphics acceleration for specific features like GPU-accelerated Effects.

We recommend targeting 8GB of VRAM unless you plan to work in higher resolutions and Bit-Depths or use After Effects in conjunction with 3D rendering plugins like Cineware or GPU accelerated third-party plugins such as NeatVideo DeNoise, that depend more heavily on the graphics card’s performance and VRAM capacity.

Image-Source: Pugetsystems

Summary: VRAM requirements for Motion Design and Composting Workloads

  • Baseline: A GPU with 6-8GB of VRAM (e.g., GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060 Super)
  • Moderate 3D rendering and GPU accelerated plugins: A GPU with 8-11GB of VRAM (e.g., RTX 3060, RTX 3070)
  • Heavy 3D rendering and GPU accelerated plugins: A GPU with 11-24GB of VRAM (e.g., RTX 2080Ti, RTX 3090)

Graphic Design

Graphic design programs like Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign, and Affinity designer see only marginal performance benefits when utilizing a more powerful GPU. Even a budget GPU with just 4GB of VRAM can be sufficient for most graphic design workloads.

Scaling up to more than 8GB will not impact performance, and even most premium GPUs will not perform better than a typical 8GB graphics card, even when working at higher resolutions.

Image-Source: Pugetsystems

Summary: VRAM requirements for Graphic Design

  • Baseline: A GPU with 4-6GB of VRAM (e.g., GTX 1660)
  • Moderately complex artboards: A GPU with 4-6GB of VRAM (e.g., GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060)
  • Highly complex artboards: A GPU with 6-8GB of VRAM (e.g., RTX 2060 Super)

Gaming

Gaming has the most diverse VRAM usage across workloads affected by several different factors like resolution, graphics quality, or games played.

Most games today let you adjust the quality of graphics you’ll want to play at.

Options typically range from low to ultra (and some manual more granular control), with every higher preset progressively increasing the shadow complexity, post-effects, object details and many other visual aspects of the game.

Choosing a higher preset will require an increasing amount of VRAM to hold the extensive texture data and model detail in memory.

Of course every Game has its own VRAM requirements and we will only be able to give a generalized overview here.

Open world games like Shadow of Mordor will consume a considerably higher amount of VRAM simply at Ultra-settings because of the higher number of details that need to be loaded.

Other modern Games might see no increase in VRAM requirements at all when changing your quality settings.

Many game developers optimize their games to run on GPUs that have less VRAM, so do keep an eye out for your game’s official system requirements.

You will need to prioritize what is essential for your gaming experience before choosing a graphics card. Usually, sticking with higher resolutions will force you to play with reduced quality unless you are willing to invest in a high-end graphics card.

Exceeding the VRAM available on your graphics card will lead to stutters and crashes, while having an excess of VRAM will lead to no real-world performance difference, similar to system RAM.

Another factor people tend to forget is VRAM allocation vs. actual usage. For example, Microsoft Flight Simulator allocates/reserves the full 11GB of VRAM available on an RTX 2080Ti even though it might use less at a given time.

It goes without saying that your GPU and CPU’s processing power have to be considered as well, as this will impact your gaming performance even more than ample VRAM.

Image-Source: Techgage

Our recommendation is to go with a GPU with at least 6GB of graphics memory if you plan on playing games at 1080p, high quality and reasonable framerates.

Most graphics cards with this VRAM capacity will run most modern games, even demanding ones above 60 fps at high quality.

For high refresh rate 1080p and 1440p gaming, we recommend buying a current or last-gen GPU with at least 8GB of VRAM.

You can run games just fine with 6GB of VRAM, but with memory consumption increasing with every new game released, it’s best to get something stronger from the start to remain futureproof.

For 4K gaming, going up to or even above 10GB of VRAM is a wise choice, especially with modern games already consuming large amounts of VRAM. Going with this configuration will let you play at high, or ultra presets at 4K, most likely even for most games launching in the near future.

The memory bandwidth and processing power also play a vital role here, which is why cards like the RTX 3080 with 10GB of GDDR6X VRAM outperform the previous-gen RTX 2080Ti with 11GB of GDDR6 VRAM by almost 50% in 1440p and 70% in 4K.

Summary: VRAM requirements for gaming

  • 1080p: A GPU with 4-6GB of VRAM (e.g. RTX 2060, GTX 1660 Super)
  • 1440p: A GPU with 6-8GB of VRAM (e.g. RX 5700XT, RTX 3060 Ti)
  • 4K: A GPU with 6-10GB of VRAM (e.g. RX 6800XT, RTX 3080)

Multi-GPU VRAM utilization explained: Are they worth more than one GPU?

Running multiple GPUs can help accelerate some specific workloads found in 3D Rendering and Video Editing significantly. However, the available VRAM doesn’t stack with added GPUs.

The graphics card and PCIe slot technology available today are not advanced enough to allow a GPU to access another’s memory in real-time without having a considerable amount of latency.

A typical multi-GPU setup works by loading identical copies of the workload into the VRAM of each of the GPUs available in the system. Each graphics card then processes the data, and this parallel computing is where the actual performance lies.

Memory stacking does work when directly connecting your GPUs through an NVLINK bridge.

While Nvidia bundles their potential memory pooling NVLink feature with premium GeForce and Quadro cards, it must be supported by your workload’s software to use the combined memory of multiple GPUs.

To not be reliable on NVLink and with few developers supporting the feature, we recommend buying graphics cards with a larger capacity for the best compatibility, even in multi-GPU configurations.

FAQs

Is more VRAM better for rendering?

The rendering performance does scale with the available VRAM to a specific point where the 3D scene’s entire Data can easily fit into the VRAM and does not need to be offloaded into the system memory.

After this, the additional VRAM will have little impact on performance, and the additional performance you will get comes solely from the increased processing cores on the GPU and some potential Software-level optimizations that make use of free VRAM like Caches and Ray-Trees.

What happens if you run out of VRAM?

When a graphics card runs out of VRAM, the data meant to be loaded into the graphics memory is offloaded into the system memory (RAM) – if the Software / Game supports this. Almost always, this will lead to a decrease in performance, stuttering or even crashes.

Can VRAM be increased?

Unfortunately, unlike traditional RAM, increasing your VRAM is not possible as it is soldered directly onto the GPU’s PCB (Printed Circuit Board). However, by using features like Nvidia’s NVLink, it may be possible to pool multiple GPUs’ memory, though support depends on your software.

 

That’s about it from us! Let us know of any questions in the comments or our expert Forum!

CGDirector is Reader-supported. When you buy through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

How to Increase Dedicated Video RAM (VRAM) in Windows 10 and 11

Seeing errors related to dedicated video RAM on your Windows PC? Struggling to run graphic-intensive programs like video editors and new video games? You may need more video RAM (VRAM).

But what even is this, and how can you increase VRAM? Read on for everything you need to know about video RAM in Windows 10 and 11.

What Is Dedicated Video RAM (VRAM)?

Video RAM (or VRAM, pronounced «VEE-ram») is a special type of RAM that works with your computer’s graphics processing unit, or GPU.

The GPU is a chip on your computer’s graphics card (also called the video card) that’s responsible for displaying images on your screen. Though technically incorrect, the terms GPU and graphics card are often used interchangeably.

Your video RAM holds information that the GPU needs, including game textures and lighting effects. This allows the GPU to quickly access the info and output video to your monitor.

Using video RAM for this task is much faster than using your system RAM, because video RAM is right next to the GPU in the graphics card. VRAM is built for this high-intensity purpose and it’s thus «dedicated.»

How to Check Your VRAM in Windows 10 and Windows 11

You can easily view the amount of video RAM you have in Windows 10 by following these steps:

  1. Open the Settings menu by pressing Win + I.
  2. Select the System entry, then click Display on the left sidebar.
  3. Scroll down and click the Advanced display settings text at the bottom.
  4. On the resulting menu, select the monitor you’d like to view settings for (if necessary). Then click the Display adapter properties text at the bottom.
  5. In a new window, you’ll see your current video RAM listed next to Dedicated Video Memory.

To reach this menu on Windows 11, go to Settings > System > Display > Advanced display. Then choose a display and click Display adapter properties.

Under Adapter Type, you’ll see the name of your Nvidia or AMD graphics card, depending on what device you have. If you see AMD Accelerated Processing Unit or Intel HD Graphics (more likely), you’re using integrated graphics. We cover more on this below.

How to Increase VRAM

The best way to increase your video RAM is to purchase a new or better graphics card. If you’re using integrated graphics and suffer from poor performance, upgrading to a dedicated card (even one of the best budget graphics cards) will do wonders for your video output.

However, if this isn’t an option for you (like on laptops), you may be able to increase your dedicated VRAM in two ways.

How to Increase VRAM in the BIOS

The first method is adjusting the VRAM allocation in your computer’s UEFI or BIOS. Enter your BIOS and look for an option in the menu named Advanced Features, Advanced Chipset Features, or similar. Inside that, look for a secondary category called something like Graphics Settings, Video Settings, or VGA Share Memory Size.

These should contain an option to adjust how much memory you allocate to the GPU. The default is usually 128MB; try upping this to 256MB or 512MB if you have enough to spare.

Not every CPU or BIOS has this option, though. If you can’t change it, there’s a workaround that might help you.

Faking a VRAM Increase in Windows

Because most integrated graphics solutions automatically adjust to use the amount of system RAM they need, the details reported in the Adapter Properties window don’t really matter. In fact, for integrated graphics, the Dedicated Video Memory value is completely fictitious. The system reports that dummy value simply so games see something when they check how much VRAM you have.

Thus, you can modify a Registry value to change the amount VRAM your system reports to games. This doesn’t actually increase your VRAM; it just modifies that dummy value. If a game refuses to start because you «don’t have enough VRAM,» upping this value might fix that.

Open a Registry Editor window by typing regedit into the Start Menu. Remember that you can mess up your system in the Registry if you modify the wrong values, so take care while here.

Head to the following location:

The specified language : markup does not exist'
Code generation failed!!

'

Right-click the Intel folder in the left panel and choose New > Key. Name this key GMM. Once you’ve made it, select the new GMM folder on the left and right-click inside the right side.

Select New > DWORD (32-bit) Value. Name this DedicatedSegmentSize and give it a value, making sure to select the Decimal option. In megabytes, the minimum value is 0 (disabling the entry) and the maximum is 512. Set this value, restart your computer, and see if it helps a game run better.

These methods aren’t guaranteed to fix your video memory issues, but they’re still worth a try if you run into problems. If you don’t have a lot of system RAM and are having trouble running games with integrated graphics, try adding additional RAM or freeing up RAM for the integrated graphics to use. With integrated graphics, your system will use your standard RAM, instead of dedicated video RAM in a graphics card, so you need plenty to run games smoothly.

Like with most hardware tasks, upgrading your RAM or video card is often difficult on a laptop but simple to do on a desktop.

What Kinds of Tasks Need Video RAM?

Before we talk about specific values for video memory, we should mention what aspects of games and other graphics-intensive apps use the most VRAM.

A big factor in VRAM consumption is your monitor’s resolution (more specifically, the resolution you’re running a game at). Video RAM stores the frame buffer, which holds an image before and during the time that your GPU displays it on the screen. Higher-quality displays (such as a 4K HDR monitor) use more VRAM because higher-resolution images take more pixels to display.

Aside from your monitor’s display, textures in a game can drastically affect how much VRAM you need. Most modern PC games let you fine-tune graphical settings for performance or visual quality.

You may be able to play a game from several years ago at Low or Medium settings with a cheaper card (or even integrated graphics). But High or Ultra quality, or custom mods that make in-game textures look even better than they normally do, will need lots of video RAM.

Beautification features like anti-aliasing (the smoothing of jagged edges) also use more VRAM due to the extra pixels required. If you play on two monitors at once, that’s even more intensive.

Specific games can also require different amounts of VRAM depending on their graphical fidelity. An older cartoony game like Overwatch isn’t too graphically demanding, but a title with lots of advanced lighting effects and detailed textures, like Cyberpunk 2077, needs more resources.

Conversely, a cheap card with just 2GB of VRAM (or even integrated graphics with 8GB+ of system RAM) is sufficient for playing PC titles from 20-plus years ago. Games back then had nowhere near modern amounts of RAM at their disposal.

Even if you’re not interested in gaming, some popular software requires a fair amount of VRAM too. 3D design software like AutoCAD, particularly intense edits in Photoshop, and editing high-quality video will all suffer if you don’t have enough video RAM.

How Much VRAM Do I Need?

It’s clear that there’s no perfect amount of VRAM for everyone. However, we can provide some basic guidelines about how much VRAM you should aim for in a graphics card.

  • 1-2GB of VRAM: These cards are usually under $100. They offer better performance than integrated graphics, but can’t handle most modern games at above-average settings. Only purchase a card with this amount of VRAM if you want to play older games that won’t work with integrated graphics. Not recommended for video editing or 3D work.
  • 3-6GB of VRAM: These mid-range cards are good for moderate gaming or somewhat intensive video editing. You won’t be able to use ultra-insane texture packs, but you can expect to play modern games at 1080p with few issues. 6GB is a more future-proof option than something like 4GB.
  • 8GB-12GB of VRAM and above: High-end video cards with this much RAM are for serious gamers. If you want to play the latest games at 4K resolution, you need a card with plenty of VRAM.

However, you should take the above generalizations with a grain of salt. Graphics card manufacturers add the appropriate amount of VRAM to a card depending on how powerful the GPU is.

Thus, a cheap $75 graphics card will have a small amount of VRAM, while a $500 graphics card will pack a lot more. If a weak GPU isn’t powerful enough to render video that takes 8GB of VRAM to store, it’s a waste to have that much VRAM in the card.

Extremes aren’t the concern with VRAM. You don’t need an $800, top-of-the-line card with 12GB of VRAM to play 2D indie platformers. Really, you only need to worry about how much VRAM to get when a card you want to buy is available in multiple VRAM configurations. VRAM isn’t the only factor that should go into your GPU decision.

Common Video RAM Concerns

Remember that just like normal RAM, more VRAM doesn’t always mean better performance. If your card has 4GB of VRAM and you’re playing a game that only uses 2GB, upgrading to an 8GB card isn’t going to do anything noticeable.

Conversely, not having enough VRAM is a huge problem. If VRAM fills up, the system has to rely on standard RAM and performance will take a huge hit. You’ll suffer from a lower frame rate, texture pop-ins, and other adverse effects. In extreme cases, the game could slow to a crawl and become unplayable (anything under 30FPS).

Remember that VRAM is only one factor in performance. If you don’t have a powerful enough CPU, rendering 4K video will take forever. A lack of system RAM prevents you from running many programs at once, and using a mechanical hard drive will severely limit your system performance too. And some cheaper graphics cards use slow DDR3 VRAM, which is inferior to DDR6 and DDR5 used in modern cards.

The best way to find out which graphics card and amount of video RAM is right for you is to talk to someone knowledgeable. Ask a friend who knows about the latest graphics cards, or post on a forum like Reddit or Tom’s Hardware asking if a specific card would work for your needs.

Understanding VRAM With Integrated Graphics

So far, our discussion has assumed that you have a dedicated graphics card in your PC. Most people who build their own computer or buy a prebuilt gaming PC have a desktop with a video card. Some beefier laptops even include a dedicated graphics card.

But budget desktop or off-the-shelf laptops don’t include video cards—they use integrated graphics instead.

An integrated graphics solution means that the GPU is on the same die as the CPU, and shares your normal system RAM instead of using its own dedicated VRAM. This is a budget-friendly solution and allows laptops to output basic graphics without the need for a space and energy-hogging video card. But integrated graphics are poor for gaming and graphically intensive tasks.

How much performance you’ll get from integrated graphics depends on your CPU. Newer Intel CPUs with Intel Iris Xe Graphics are more powerful than their cheaper and older counterparts, but still pale in comparison to dedicated graphics.

As long as your computer is within a few years old, you should have no problems watching videos, playing low-intensity games, and working in basic photo and video editing apps with integrated graphics. However, playing the latest graphically impressive games at a comfortable frame rate with integrated graphics is not possible.

Now You Understand Video RAM

Now you know what video RAM is, how much you need, and how to increase it. In the end, though, remember that video RAM is a small aspect of your computer’s overall performance. A weak GPU wouldn’t perform well even with a lot of VRAM.

So if you’re looking to increase gaming and graphical performance, you’ll likely need to upgrade your graphics card, processor, and/or RAM first—the VRAM should sort itself out when you do all this.

Available graphics memory 4096 is used by 1024. How to find out the memory of the video card

Computer memory plays a vital role in quick access to applications and programs. Computer memory or RAM is used by the system processor to store data. This is the volatile memory on the motherboard that stores the operating system and programs for quick access. Your system processor continuously loads data from the hard disk into RAM before execution. But sometimes you may need a buffer for high quality videos, video editors, 3D structures and a new game on your PC.

What is VRAM

Graphics-intensive applications and programs use a large amount of system memory to render graphic data with high quality, color, clarity, and definition. In these cases, your system may run out of RAM and struggle to buffer high-intensity graphics programs as your graphics card shares system memory. If you don’t need to buffer high quality video applications, your PC runs fine with RAM. Otherwise, you need a special type of memory called 9 to buffer a high-quality visual display to the monitor.0007 V >

Video memory is designed for special processing of high intensity video faster than system RAM. Graphics cards or the graphics processor use video memory (VRAM) built into it to store images and video data. VRAM is also called virtual RAM and is used as GPU memory to easily handle graphics applications, games, complex textures, and 3D graphics.

In the latest games and videos, you may need to play 1080p or 4k video, which requires a lot of VRAM. Also, VRAM processes more pixels for higher resolution images to display them better. At the same time, modern games require more detail and exact system requirements to run them on your monitor, and having insufficient VRAM will lead to a large overload of the GPU.

If you don’t have enough VRAM, you won’t be able to run modern games. In this case, you will need a high-performance graphics card to easily load complex textures with high-resolution images.

How much video memory do you need? Such quality of graphics requires a powerful video card — if you want to play at acceptable settings, without suffering from «slideshow» during FPS drawdown.

p, blockquote 10,1,0,0,0 –>

However, graphics quality is not the only problem that modern gamers face. In the gaming industry, it has become a good style to make games with an open seamless world (if the genre implies such a “feature” — for example, an RPG or a shooter).

p, blockquote 11,0,0,0,0 –>

A game in which the user has to constantly wait for locations to load has a high chance of becoming a failure.

p, blockquote 12,0,0,0,0 –>

To remember all (or at least the closest) objects of such a game world, a substantial amount of video memory is required. For modern games, the figure has become the norm from 3 GB.

p, blockquote 13,0,0,0,0 –>

I don’t want to upset you, but this is only the case today — in a couple of years, top-end video cards may not be able to pull new items at ultra settings. What did you think?

p, blockquote 14,0,0,0,0 –>

ENT, unusual quests that differ from the usual «kill everyone».

Check the amount of VRAM on the video card

Step 1 . Go to Settings > System > Display and select « Advanced display settings » on the right.

Step 2 . In the new window, select « Display adapter properties for display».

Step 3 . In a new window, you will see the type of adapter used in your system and other graphical information under the Adapter 9 tab0008″. Remember it or take a screenshot to compare the memory after the increase.

How to increase Video RAM from BIOS

This is the recommended method for reallocating VRAM. However, this does not work on all motherboards and you are not allowed to reallocate memory on your PC yourself. However, you can try changing the BIOS settings and check if you have sufficient rights to change the amount of allocated video memory on your PC.

Step 1 . Reboot your PC, laptop and enter the BIOS by pressing — F2 or the Del key during boot. You can see how to enter the BIOS from different motherboard manufacturers. In the BIOS, you need to go to Advanced > video/Graphics settings or VGA Share Memory Size or UMA Frame Buffer Size or Share Memory and select the value. Below in the pictures I have given two examples, the first is my UEFI Asrock on a PC, and the second is an old BENQ laptop with a normal BIOS.

You must understand that BIOS settings are different for everyone, and sometimes BIOSes have advanced settings that do not show all the settings by default. Use Google or Yandex «image search» by entering the motherboard model there.

Step 2 . Once you have chosen the value you need, be sure to save the BIOS settings by pressing F10.

Computer memory plays an important role in quick access to applications and programs. Computer memory or RAM is used by the system processor to store data. This is a volatile memory on the motherboard that stores the operating system and system programs for easy access. Your system processor continuously loads data from the hard drive into RAM before execution. But sometimes you may need to buffer high quality video, video editors, 3D structures and a new game on your PC.

What VRAM is all about

Graphics-intensive applications and programs use a large amount of system memory to display graphic data with high quality, color, clarity, and clarity on the display. In these cases, your system may run out of RAM and high-intensity graphics program buffering issues as your graphics card shares system memory. If you don’t need to buffer high-quality video applications, your computer is fine with RAM. Otherwise, you need a special type of memory called 9 to buffer a high-quality visual display on the system monitor.0007 video memory (VRAM) .

Video memory is designed for special high-intensity video processing faster than system memory. Video cards or graphics processors use the video memory (VRAM) built into it to store images and video data. VRAM is also called virtual RAM and is used as GPU memory for simple processing of graphics applications, games, complex textures, and 3D graphics.

However, some applications, such as the latest games and videos, may require 1080p or 4k video playback, which requires a lot of video memory. Also, VRAM processes more pixels for higher resolution images to display them better. At the same time, modern games require increased detail and exact system requirements to run them on the system monitor, and the lack of VRAM will lead to a large overload of the GPU.

Why do you need VRAM?

If you don’t have enough VRAM, you won’t be able to run modern games. In this case, you will need a graphics card with more video memory. To easily load complex textures with high-resolution images, you may need to increase the amount of dedicated video memory on your video card.

Increasing video memory

The first thing to note is that if you are looking for information on how to add video memory to a discrete graphics adapter, then we hasten to disappoint you: it is impossible. All video cards that are connected to the motherboard have their own memory chips and only sometimes, when they are full, “throw” part of the information into the RAM. The volume of chips is fixed and cannot be adjusted.

In turn, the built-in cards use the so-called Shared memory, that is, the one that the system “shares” with it. The size of the allocated space in the RAM is determined by the type of chip and motherboard, as well as BIOS settings.

Before attempting to increase the amount of allocated memory for the video core, you need to find out what the maximum amount the chip supports. Let’s see what type of built-in kernel we have in our system.

We see that in this case the kernel uses the maximum amount of memory. This means that no manipulation will help increase its performance. There are custom drivers that add some properties to such video cores, for example, support for newer versions of DirectX, shaders, increased frequencies, and more. The use of such software is highly discouraged as it may cause malfunctions and even disable your integrated graphics.

Moving on. If «DirectX Diagnostic Tool»

shows the amount of memory that is different from the maximum, then it is possible, by changing the BIOS settings, to add the size of the allocated space to the RAM. The motherboard settings can be accessed when the system boots. During the appearance of the manufacturer’s logo, you must press the DELETE key several times. If this option did not work, then read the manual for the motherboard, perhaps in your case another button or combination is used.

Since the BIOS on different motherboards can vary greatly from each other, it is impossible to give exact setup instructions, only general recommendations.

For BIOS type AMI, you need to go to the tab called «Advanced»

with possible additions, for example,
«Advanced BIOS Features»
and find the item where it is possible to select a value that determines the amount of memory. In our case, this is
«UMA Frame Buffer Size»
. Here we simply select the desired size and save the settings with the key
F10
.

In UEFI BIOS, you must first enable advanced mode. Consider an example with the ASUS motherboard BIOS.

Using the integrated graphics core results in reduced performance in games and applications that use the graphics card. At the same time, if the power of a discrete adapter is not required for everyday tasks, then the integrated video core may well become a free alternative to the latter.

Do not demand the impossible from the integrated graphics and try to «overclock» it with the help of drivers and other software. Remember that abnormal modes of operation can lead to the inoperability of the chip or other components on the motherboard.

Have you experienced video memory errors on your Windows PC? Trouble running graphics programs such as video editors and new video games? If yes, then you may need more video memory.

But what is it and how can you increase it? In this article, I will share everything I know about video memory with you, so read on!

What is video memory?

Video memory (or VRAM, pronounced vee-RAM) is a special type of RAM that works with your computer’s GPU or video card’s GPU. The GPU is the chip on your computer’s graphics card (or graphics card) that is responsible for displaying images on the screen.

Although technically incorrect, the terms GPU and graphics card are often used interchangeably.

Your video memory contains information about what the GPU needs, such as game textures and lighting effects. This allows the GPU to quickly access information and display video on the monitor. Using video RAM for this task is much faster than using your RAM as video RAM sits next to the GPU on the graphics card and is built for this high intensive purpose.

You can easily view the amount of video memory you have in Windows 10 by following these steps:

  1. Open the Options menu by pressing the keyboard shortcuts « Windows + I
    «.
  2. Select System, then click Display on the left sidebar.
  3. Scroll down and click on the «graphics adapter properties» text.
  4. In the window that appears, go to the «Adapter» tab and look at the «Adapter Information» section. But integrated graphics are ill-suited for gaming and graphical tasks.

    How powerful your integrated graphics is depends on your processor. The new processors with Intel Iris Plus graphics are more powerful than their cheaper, older counterparts, but still pale in comparison to dedicated graphics.

    With integrated graphics, you should have no problem watching videos, playing games at low intensity, and using basic photo and video editing applications. However, it is basically impossible to play the latest graphically impressive games with integrated graphics.

    What applications need video memory?

    Before I go into specific numbers, I should mention which aspects of games and other graphics intensive applications use a lot of VRAM.

    A big factor in VRAM consumption is the resolution of your monitor. Video memory stores a framebuffer that contains the image before and during the time your GPU renders it on the screen. More powerful displays (such as games on a 4K screen) take up more VRAM because higher resolution images take up more pixels to display.

    In addition to your display, the textures in your game can greatly affect the amount of VRAM you need. Most modern PC games allow you to fine-tune performance or image quality. You can play the game in Low or Medium mode with a cheaper card (or even integrated graphics). But high or ultra quality, or custom mods that make the textures inside the game look even better than the developers intended, will require a lot of RAM.

    Decorative features such as anti-aliasing also use more VRAM due to the extra pixels. If you’re playing on two monitors at the same time, it’s even more intense.

    Specific games may also require different amounts of VRAM. A game like Overwatch is not too demanding on graphics, but a game with lots of modern lighting effects and detailed textures like Assassin’s Creed Origins requires more resources.

    Conversely, a cheap card with 2 GB of VRAM (or integrated graphics) is enough to play old PC games or emulate retro consoles.

    Back then, games didn’t have more than 2 GB of VRAM.

    Even if you are not interested in games, some popular programs also require a significant amount of VRAM. 3D design software like AutoCAD, especially heavy editing in Photoshop, and high quality video editing will suffer if you don’t have enough video memory.

    I hope it’s clear that there is no ideal amount of VRAM for everyone. However, I can provide some basic guidance on how much VRAM you should have in your graphics card.

    • 1-2 GB VRAM: These cards generally provide better performance than integrated graphics, but cannot handle most modern games at average values. Buy a card with this amount of VRAM if you want to play older games that won’t work with integrated graphics. Not recommended for video editing or 3D work.
    • 3-6 GB VRAM: These mid-range cards are good for moderate gaming or somewhat intensive video editing.
    • 8 GB VRAM and up: High-end cards with this large RAM for serious gamers. If you want to play the latest games at 4K resolution, you need a card with more VRAM.

    Graphic card manufacturers add the appropriate amount of VRAM to the card depending on how powerful the GPU is. So a cheap graphics card will have a small amount of VRAM, while an expensive graphics card will have a lot more.

    Problems with video memory

    Remember that, like regular RAM, more VRAM doesn’t always mean better performance. If your card has 4GB of VRAM and you’re playing a game that only uses 2GB, upgrading to an 8GB card won’t make much of a difference.

    Conversely, not having enough VRAM is a huge problem. If VRAM fills up, the system must rely on standard RAM and performance will suffer. You will notice lower frame rates, textured popups, and other adverse effects. In extreme cases, the game can slow down the display on the screen and become unplayable (anything less than 30 FPS).

    Remember that VRAM is only one of the performance factors. If you don’t have a powerful processor, it will take a long time to render HD video. The lack of system memory prevents you from running multiple programs at once, and using a mechanical hard drive will severely limit your system’s performance. And some cheaper graphics cards can use slower DDR3 VRAM, which is inferior to DDR5.

    The best way to find out which graphics card and amount of video memory is right for you is to talk to someone who knows. Ask a friend who knows about the latest graphics cards, or ask on the forum if a particular card will work for your needs.

    How to increase video memory

    The best way to increase video memory is to buy a graphics card. If you’re using integrated graphics and getting poor performance, upgrading to a dedicated card will do wonders for your video output. However, if this option is not suitable for you (for example, on laptops), you can increase your dedicated VRAM in two ways.

    The first is the VRAM allocation setting in your computer’s BIOS. Enter the BIOS and find the menu with Advanced Chipset Features or similar (Advanced Chipset Features). Inside this search, look for a secondary category called Graphics Settings, Video Settings, VGA Share Memory Size.

    They should contain an option to configure how much memory you allocate to the GPU. The default is usually 128MB, try increasing it to 256MB or 512MB if you have enough to spare. However, not every processor or BIOS has this setting. If you can’t change it, there is a workaround that might help you.

    Magnification Fake

    Since most integrated graphics solutions are automatically configured to use the required amount of RAM, the details listed in the Adapter Properties window are of little importance. In fact, for integrated graphics, the value of dedicated video memory is completely fictitious. The system reports a bogus value so that games see something when they check how much VRAM you have.

    So you can change the registry value to change the amount of VRAM your system tells games. It doesn’t actually increase your VRAM, it just changes this bogus value. If the game won’t launch because you don’t have enough VRAM, raising this value may fix the problem.

    Open the Registry Editor window by typing «regedit» into the Run window. Remember that you can mess up your system in the registry, so be careful while you’re here.

    Head to the following location:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Intel

    Right-click the Intel folder on the left sidebar and select New > Partition. Name this section GMM. Once you’ve done that, select the new GMM folder on the left and right click on the right side. Select New > DWORD (32-bit) Value. Name it «DedicatedSegmentSize» and give it a value, making sure you select the «Decimal» option. In MB, the minimum value is 0 (disable recording) and the maximum is 512. Set this value, restart your computer and see if it helps the game.

    These methods are not guaranteed to work, but they are still worth trying if you run into problems. If you don’t have much system memory and are having trouble playing games with integrated graphics, try adding more RAM to use the integrated graphics.

    Now you understand what video memory is

    Now you know what video memory is, how much you need and how to increase it. In the end, remember that video memory is only a small aspect of your computer’s overall performance. A weak GPU will not work even with a lot of VRAM. So if you want to increase your gaming and graphical performance, you will most likely need to upgrade your graphics card, processor, and/or RAM first.

    Do you have a dedicated graphics card or are you using integrated graphics? Have you ever encountered a VRAM related error? Write it in the comments!

    Increasing Dedicated Video RAM in Windows 10

    Next, we will explain how to change the amount of video RAM on your Windows 10 system. You can reallocate system RAM as dedicated video RAM on a Windows PC either through BIOS settings or through registry settings.

    Check the amount of VRAM on your graphics card

    Before trying out ways to increase VRAM, you first need to check how much dedicated video memory your graphics card has in Windows 10.

    Go to Start menu and click Settings. Go to System and click Display on the left sidebar of System Preferences.

    Scroll down the Display menu and select Display Adapter Properties at the bottom of the window.

    In a new pop-up window you will see the type of adapter used in your system and other graphical information on tab Adapter . Check the total allocated space for dedicated video memory in adapter information.

    Increase the allocated video memory on your video card from the BIOS

    This is the recommended method for reallocating VRAM allocation memory. However, this does not work for all motherboards and you may not be allowed to reallocate memory on your PC alone. However, you can try to change the BIOS settings and check if you have enough rights to change the amount of allocated video memory on your PC.

    Restart your computer and press the BIOS key — F2, F5, F8 or Del repeatedly during boot.

    In BIOS menu , go to Advanced Features or similar.

    Now press Video/Graphics Settings or VGA Shared Memory Size . If you can’t find these options, look for a category with a similar option.

    Adjust the setting that best suits your application. The default amount of memory allocated to the GPU is typically 128 MB. You can increase the preallocated VRAM to 256MB or 512MB.

    Save the changes and restart the system.

    Increase the allocated video memory on your video card using the registry editor

    Depending on the applications you run, the system automatically adjusts the required amount of video memory. And therefore, the adapted information showing the amount of VRAM used on your video card is not always reliable. However, some applications will require more VRAM to run. In this case, you can simply copy the amount of VRAM to replace the amount of VRAM your system needs to run the application. You don’t increase the value for real, but you increase the amount of VRAM to a value that will replace the memory requirements to run the game or application.

    Complete the following steps to reallocate RAM as VRAM for integrated Intel graphics cards.

    Open Run and type regedit. Navigate to the following path:

    Right-click the Intel folder. Select New and press Key . Name the key as GMM.

    Select the new GMM folder from the left sidebar.

    Right-click on the right side of the window and select New in drop down menu.

    Select Dword (32-bit) and name it DedicatedSegmentSize.

    Double click on DedicatedSegmentSize and click the radio button with parameter Decimal to set the base value to decimal.

    Enter the number of megabytes of RAM you want to allocate as VRAM in data value . Make sure you enter a number between 0 and 512.

    Save to apply the changes and reboot the system.

    What conclusions can we draw? Based on the foregoing, when choosing a video card, I advise, first of all, to focus on the memory frequency, ignoring the volume, if the upgrade budget is limited.

    And that’s all for me. See you next time on my blog pages. Do not forget to subscribe to the newsletter and share publications on social networks!

    Video memory is one of the technical characteristics of the graphics card (video card). It stores data that is required to display an image on a monitor. If there is not enough video memory, the quality of the graphics is reduced and the broadcast may freeze or display incorrectly. To resolve these issues, try increasing the amount of RAM on your graphics card. But this will not help improve performance if the bandwidth of the video card bus is insufficient.

    To figure out how to increase the video memory on a computer or laptop, let’s find out which graphics card is installed in it. The type of adapter depends on how its volume is increased. Lightweight portable gadgets (netbooks, ultrabooks) usually have compact internal (integrated) video adapters. Manufacturers complete budget laptops with them. The presence of just such a board is evidenced by the joint location of the HDMI, LAN, USB connectors. Powerful gaming laptops and desktop PCs are equipped with external (discrete) graphics adapters. They are massive and productive, have their own cooling system. If the video memory of the integrated board is distributed using the “Shared memory” technology, then its volume is changed manually. In this case, the easiest way is to use the tools built into the operating system. Check if Catalyst Control Center is installed on your OS version. To do this, go to «Control Panel» → «Hardware and Sound», in the «Devices and Printers» section, select «Device Manager». It lists all the devices connected to the computer. Information about the graphics card is located in the «Video Adapters» section. Some computer models have more than one video card. Right-click on the adapter you are interested in and select the «Properties» section from the drop-down menu. In the «Drivers» tab there is an item «Frame buffer» or «UMA frame buffer». It sets the maximum amount of memory that will become available for the video card. If there is no framebuffer in the specified path, you will have to change the current UMA settings. When you enter the basic I / O system, find the «Integrated devices» section, and in it the settings for «BIOS VGA sharing memory». The name may vary slightly depending on the BIOS version and computer model. Next, select the appropriate volume value. It is not recommended to set the maximum, try to set twice as much as the default. Then save your changes and exit the BIOS. It is not possible to increase the video memory of discrete graphics cards using the settings. To make such a video card more productive, use a special program. For Windows XP, the free ATITool is fine. To improve the performance of more modern adapters on other operating systems, MSI Afterburner will help you. Its functionality allows you to gradually increase the clock frequency of the processor of an external video card. This leads to an increase in its performance without changing the amount of video memory.

    Use caution when changing graphics settings. Too much load can damage it. Please note that the increase in performance of the integrated graphics card comes at the expense of RAM. If it is not enough, the computer will slow down. An old discrete card is almost impossible to «overclock». If your efforts have not led to satisfactory results, obsolete components can only be replaced.

    More and more modern programs and games are placing increased demands on computer hardware, in particular, on graphics adapters. The lack of video card memory leads to the fact that many applications not only freeze, but also do not start at all. And here the question arises of how to increase the amount of video memory, and whether it is possible to do this. Next, we will consider several options that allow, if not to increase it, then at least to use it in the most optimal way.

    What is the role of video memory in the system

    Needless to say, graphics card memory is very much like the main RAM of a computer system.

    Almost the same functions of loading the main software components of programs and applications with the transfer of calculations to the graphics processor are assigned to it. It is clear that with a small volume, no matter how hard you try, you will not be able to load more than what it is designed for. Therefore, many games not only malfunction, but sometimes they still do not work at all. But the problem of how to increase the video memory of a video card, as it turns out, is solved quite simply. True, this cannot be called an increase, since the size of the video memory does not change physically.

    Is more better or not?

    The subject of comparative phallometry of ordinary users is often the amount of video memory. It happened at the suggestion of marketers — by vtyukhivaya new product, they will buzz your ears about it.

    More advanced users, especially gamers who have to sacrifice their personal time to indulge in their favorite hobby, pay attention, first of all, to the memory frequency (and, of course, to the core frequency).

    p, blockquote 8,0,0,0,0 –>

    Why is that? It doesn’t matter how much data a graphics card can store — if it’s running slowly, even overclocking won’t always help to significantly increase performance in games.

    Determining the type of graphics adapter

    Before looking for a solution to the problem and an answer to the question of how to increase video memory, you need to determine the type of graphics adapter installed in the system.

    They are of two types: integrated (built into the motherboard) and discrete (inserted into special slots).

    A visually integrated adapter can be identified by the presence of adjacent HDMI, USB, LAN, etc. connectors.

    You can get more detailed information in the Device Manager by calling it either from the Control Panel or from the Run console (Win + R) with the devmgmt.msc command.

    However, the most complete data is contained in the DirectX dialog box called from the Run menu with the dxdiag line. On the «Screen» tab, all information will be presented. By the way, you can find out the main characteristics of integrated video adapters only in this way.

    How to increase the video memory of discrete cards by increasing performance

    First, let’s consider how to increase the video memory of a discrete video card. Ideally, of course, the easiest way is to buy a new one, but modern adapters are very expensive, so it’s better to start setting up what is available.

    Based on the fact that NVIDIA and AMD/ATI chips are mainly offered on the market today, it is worth using the accompanying software that comes pre-installed when buying a PC or laptop.

    Also for Windows systems, in terms of improving performance, utilities like ATITool or MSI Afterburner are great, which allow you to gradually increase the clock speed of the GPU, leaving the memory indicator unchanged.

    In addition, you can use programs like Catalyst, PhysX or Riva Tuner, which can optimize the memory of the video chip for use in certain games or other applications, freeing up resources.

    Frame buffer settings

    Now let’s see how to increase the video memory on a laptop. Most modern budget models are equipped with integrated chips.

    You can view the parameters of the allocated memory through the «Device Manager», where you need to select properties from the right-click menu and go to the «Drivers» tab. There is a UMA framebuffer parameter string here, where the required value is located. But there may not be such an item, so the question of how to increase the video memory should be solved by another method. What? BIOS settings that involve changing the distributed dynamic memory.

    How to increase video memory using RAM (shared) via BIOS

    In the primary I / O system, which is called by pressing certain keys, combinations or special buttons, you need to find a section like Video RAM or Shared Memory.

    How to increase the video memory using these settings? To improve performance, the aperture parameter, designated as AGP OverVoltage, is changed. It must be remembered that the increase is calculated according to a certain formula. For example, let’s take 16 MB of integrated adapter memory and 256 MB of main RAM. The result will be 256 MB/(16 MB/2)=32 MB. And here is an interesting paradox. For 256 MB RAM and 64 MB adapter memory, the increase will be 256 MB/(64 MB/2)=8 MB.

    In the VGA Shared Memory settings (aka UMA buffer), you need to set the required parameter, but it is not recommended to set the maximum value. The best option is to set a value that is only twice the default value.

    Windows version does not support the installed amount of memory even if you install 8 GB, it can use a maximum of 4 GB.

    Many users are unaware that each version of the Windows operating system supports a certain maximum amount of RAM. As noted above, x86 uses a maximum of 4 GB of RAM in all versions of Windows. And now let’s get acquainted with the support of RAM in x64 bit operating systems:

    • Starter x86 2 GB
    • Home x64 8 GB
    • Home Premium x64 16 GB
    • Professional x64 192 GB

      Is it worth doing this

      Finally, we should add that the question of how to increase the video memory using software without changing it physically is very conditional, because in the end it is only about the most efficient use of it. In fact, in some ways it resembles overclocking a graphics adapter. But, if you are already doing this, you need to be very careful, otherwise such actions can only lead to the fact that the card will fail. At the very least, you should not set the maximum possible peak values ​​\u200b\u200bof any parameter, although graphics adapters, as well as any other devices, so to speak, have a certain margin of safety.

      Computer configuration is very important for gamers. In order to provide beautiful, high-quality graphics for a normal game or to experience modern 3D games, our computer needs a video card. It is in every laptop and computer, but is divided into different types. How to increase video card memory? First, let’s look at what it actually is.

      What is video memory

      You probably know that a graphics chip is responsible for rendering any image in a computer — for example, it calculates the interaction of objects in a game.

      Intermediate data, which is then displayed on the monitor, is stored just in the video memory. These blocks are connected to each other, by a data bus (you can read more about what it is, its bit depth and the impact on the operation of the device).

      Modern graphics accelerators now use GDDR5 memory (with the exception of budget models, some of which still run on DDR3). In fact, this is the usual RAM that is in any PC.

      But unlike the RAM, the video memory board is soldered tightly, so there is absolutely no way to replace it without destroying the video card).

      Why is this solution implemented?

      Not for foolproof purposes, as you might think. This is done so that the user, who no longer has enough video memory to run some new product in the gaming industry, does not buy an additional memory module on the cheap, but buys a new fancy video card.

      Although, if you don’t believe in conspiracy theories, you can ignore my opinion.

      Types of video cards

      For example, a video card that is invisible to the user and built into the motherboard is called an integrated video card. Discrete is an external video card.

      The integrated graphics card is responsible for the images on our computer screen. It does not have its own memory and borrows it from the operational one. Such memory is rather weak and does not withstand modern traffic. But gamers have found a way out. Consider how to increase the memory of the built-in video card. To increase the memory, you need to continuously press the Delete key. In the menu that appears on the screen, select Video Ram. Then move the mouse cursor over this line and press Enter. Select the volume you want to increase. Then save your settings. After restarting the computer, the memory will increase. If, after the actions taken, the memory has not changed, then it is better to return the previous volume in the same way. But it is worth remembering that this function will be useless if the RAM of your computer is small. In addition to wasting time and effort, this action will degrade the performance of the system.

      Discrete graphics card installed stand-alone and allows you to work with complex graphics. Varieties of desktop video cards and the amount of their memory depend on the cost and manufacturer. But any laptop with an external graphics card will cost a lot more. A discrete graphics card is characterized by high battery consumption and power consumption. It is impossible to increase the memory of such a video card, since its volume is already set by the manufacturer and built-in using a special chip. Now it has become clearer how to increase the amount of video card memory?

      BIOS settings

      Perhaps the most common problem is when 8 GB (or 6 GB) of RAM is installed, and 4 GB is available, maybe less.

      Do not hesitate to restart the computer, when you turn it on, enter the BIOS. Go to the tab Advanced , select Chipset Configuration ,

      find the line Memory Remap Feature , change Disabled to Enabled .

      Save the settings and exit by pressing the F10 key. The location of the «Memory Remap Feature» may differ from the above, as the BIOS is different. After loading Windows, we again check the available memory, it should be like this.

      Increasing the volume

      You can increase the volume of hybrid video cards using the computer’s RAM. Hybrid graphics cards are common between internal and external. You can buy a laptop with such a video card at an average price. Such a card is the best solution for users who, in addition to standard programs, use some graphics.

      The SLI hybrid is packed with the same features and high performance. It contains both discrete and integrated graphics. The user himself chooses which of the cards to use. If there is a simple work with standard programs, then an integrated card is used, which will save the duration of the battery charge. And if the user decides to play a modern 3D game, then you need to turn on the discrete one.

      Before attempting to upgrade your graphics card memory, or before buying a laptop, it’s a good idea to consult with a professional who can help you find the right computer for your needs and let you know if you can upgrade your graphics card memory.

      We hope that in the future you will no longer have questions about how to increase the video card memory.

      Check the total amount of memory allocated to the graphics card. To do this, run the dxdiag utility built into windows, go to the «Screen» tab and find the value «total memory» on it. This value is the total amount of memory that the video card can use — the sum of the built-in memory and the memory allocated from the computer’s RAM. If you are not satisfied with this value, you can try to change it.

      Launch your video card’s Control Panel. In the panel on the left, find the menu item «UMA Frame Buffer». The name may vary depending on the video card model. Set the slider to the maximum value. If there is no such menu in the «Control Panel» of the video card, you can try to change the amount of allocated video memory through the BIOS.

      Enter the computer or laptop BIOS. To do this, immediately after turning on the computer, press and hold the «Del» key on the keyboard. If the download continues as usual, try the «F2» and «Esc» keys. If it was not possible to enter the BIOS, refer to the documentation supplied with the device, because. The keys reserved for entering the BIOS may vary depending on the computer model.

      Now you need to find the parameter responsible for the amount of RAM allocated for the operation of the video card. Depending on the computer model, it may be called: «BIOS VGA sharing memory», «VGA memory», «Video memory», «AGP Aperture Size». Other names are also possible. The absence of these or similar menu items in the BIOS may mean that your motherboard does not support setting the maximum amount of allocated video memory. In this case, video memory is allocated automatically, as needed.

      From year to year, users of personal computers observe the modernization of the model range of external devices. Sometimes it is difficult to keep up with all the new products and you have to optimize the existing hardware.

      It’s worth mentioning right away that an increase in the performance of the built-in video card

      is almost impossible. The overall operating frequency can be increased in the BIOS settings by going to the integrated devices section. It is worth noting that the bundle «integrated video card + processor with graphics stuffing» will give greater performance. Such processors are often produced by Intel.

      Before taking steps to increase the memory of video cards

      , it is advisable to take a set of general measures that increase computer performance. Update drivers
      video cards
      s. Install an antivirus and scan your system drive. Often, removing malware is more effective than increasing the amount of memory. Do not use «pirated» antivirus. In order not to buy a subscription, you can use the DrWeb CureIT anti-virus utility.

      Determine the current amount of memory used by graphics cards

      oh. Run the DirectX Diagnostic Utility. To do this, press the key combination Win + R on the keyboard, in the dialog that opens, enter the line dxdiag and press Enter. Go to the «Screen» tab. Find the line «total memory». The numbers opposite it mean the total amount of memory (own and system) that
      video cards
      a use for their needs. If this value is not enough, you can try to increase it.

      To increase the amount of system memory allocated to video cards

      , open the ATI Catalist Control Center configuration utility. Look for the «UMA Frame Buffer» value. Set the maximum possible value. There is no such setting in nVidia drivers,
      memory
      is allocated automatically. The only way to change it is to increase the amount of system memory on the computer, which will cause an increase in the amount of memory allocated
      graphics cards
      e.

      Overclocking is not a method to increase the memory capacity of video cards

      s, but it can significantly increase the speed of its operation. In order to overclock hardware, you need to use the appropriate utilities. For ATI it is ATI Tray Tools and for nVidia the best program is RivaTuner. A boosted 3D graphics accelerator will probably need more powerful cooling, because. its heat dissipation will increase. It is necessary to control the temperature of the chip, overheating it can cause irreversible damage
      graphics cards
      s.

      Modern video games require a very powerful computer configuration. The most important component for video games is the video card of the computer. The power of the video card, in turn, depends on the speed of the processor of the video card, the amount and speed of the memory. You can only increase the memory in integrated video cards. But there is a way to increase the overall speed of video memory.

      • Computer, video card, ATItool software

      If you have an integrated video card, you can increase the amount of memory in the BIOS. Consider the fact that integrated video cards do not have their own memory at all and all resources are taken from RAM. If

      How to increase video memory? This question is asked by many users of personal and mobile computers. Although the answer is not unambiguous, in most cases it is impossible to do such a trick with a video card.

      Performance Issues

      The more RAM allocated to the graphics adapter, the faster and better the graphics card will process data. However, by allocating more memory to the graphics card, you reduce the amount of free RAM available to run applications. Thus, you should choose the optimal amount of memory that will allow you to use the system as comfortably as possible. If you’re only looking for a temporary performance boost, you can increase the amount of video memory and then reset it back to its original value when you’re done with video-intensive tasks. First of all, make sure that the remaining RAM will be enough for the operating system to perform the necessary tasks.
      If you are a fan of computer games, then before purchasing a laptop for gaming purposes, take an interest in the performance of the video card. In addition, to play games and watch movies in HD quality, you will need a video card equipped with a video accelerator. It is worth noting that it is impossible to change this device in a laptop (to a more powerful one). However, you can try to improve the performance of the video card yourself.

      Video cards in computers are of two types — integrated and discrete. If the video card is integrated, you can improve its memory by changing the settings in the BIOS. This can only be done if the laptop has enough powerful RAM. Since integrated cards do not have their own memory, they “pull” RAM resources. If the «RAM» is not enough, you should not add video memory at its expense. This will only worsen the performance of the laptop as a whole, lowering its performance. To enter the BIOS, turn on the computer and press the «Delete» button several times in a row. Find the line «Video RAM» and press the «Enter» key. You should have a line in which you can, at your own discretion, determine how much «RAM» the video card can use. Mark the desired value. Then save the settings and restart the laptop. This operation should increase the memory capacity of the card. If you have a discrete video card, then the method described above does not suit you, since these types of video cards are equipped with memory chips and the volume of the latter cannot be increased. However, you can get out of the situation. To do this, let’s try to increase the speed of the video card memory. First you need to download a program for overclocking the memory speed of video cards. For example: ATItool, Riva Tuner, MSI Afterburner. We will consider the further procedure using the example of ATItool, since it is the most convenient to use. Having launched it, you will see the start window in which you need to select the “Overclocking” tab. Next, find the menu «MEMORY CLOCK» or in new, Russian-language programs — «Memory speed». Move the pointer slightly to the right (or up, depending on the interface). Click OK. New settings can be immediately tested in action. In the program menu, select the «Open 3D window» section. After that, the process of testing the video card will begin. You need to keep an eye on the changing images on the screen — if there are spots or distortions, then you «took» too much memory overclocking. To set a different value, repeat the algorithm by setting a lower value. If you passed the test successfully, the video card memory can handle it. You can try increasing the overclock by moving the pointer further to the right. Practically find out the allowed memory frequency of the card by taking the 3D test. After you decide on the maximum value, save the settings.

      If all your actions did not bring the desired result, and you need a powerful video card, you will have to buy a new laptop with a more suitable device.

      If your video card stopped running modern games or there were brakes during installation, you probably wondered: how to increase the memory of a video card?

      The obvious answer is to buy a new card with the optimal amount of memory.

      But what if there is no money for a new video adapter?

      First of all, everything depends on the tasks that you face within the framework of the available hardware. Some need to play modern games at maximum settings, others are engaged in video editing or 3D modeling. For such tasks, a sufficiently productive system is required. But a video card, or rather, video memory, is not always a “weak link” and an increase in video memory will not always give a performance boost.

      Before you try to increase the amount of video memory, pay attention to other system components:

      • The processor — if it is weak or very outdated, it is unlikely that an increase in video memory will seriously affect performance.
      • RAM — everything is simple here: there is never a lot of RAM. The weak point of the computer may not be the RAM itself, but its volume.
      • Hard drive — read and write speeds make a big difference. If you have an old hard drive and you have not yet switched to an SSD, the hard drive can be the cause of unstable operation.
      • Power Supply — Your system may not have enough power supplied by the power supply.

      How to update the card?

      New cards from NVIDIA are not suitable for upgrading, which is due to the company’s desire to sell more expensive ones. If you don’t believe me, then visit the hardware store in your city. The need to explain why the user is not given such freedom will become clear. But in this article we will try to figure out how to increase video memory.

      The user can increase the quality of video card usage by increasing the quality of the memory, not the amount (these are different values). On the integrated video card, using the BIOS settings, you can increase the amount of video megabytes required for the system, for example, in older laptops and PCs.

      Why not, and what would the pros say?

      If it’s definitely not. Of course, a computer architect will tell you how to increase the video memory: add one more chip to the existing ones, and then flash the controller. In this case, there is a high probability that the card will be unsuitable for further use. Even having at least some knowledge of the computer device and its architecture, such a method cannot be recommended to the user. In 97% of cases, the card will be hopelessly damaged or burned.

      On computers with BIOS, you can set a higher value in the BIOS if the maximum is not reached there. Otherwise, there is absolutely no sense from this due to the well-known slowness of the embedded video.

      There are no other methods, and if there are such, then there is no need to describe such a thing. You can, of course, move part of the video memory to regular memory, which will further affect the video performance of your computer.

      System video memory 0 MB what is it?

      Question

      recently rummaged in video properties and found the following incomprehensible lines:

      Available in graphic memory: 2815 MB

      Video memory: 1024

      System video memory: 0 MB

      of the common system memory: 1791 MB

      . “eats” a gig of video memory for its work. . Can it be cut. And then in the GTA 4 toy in the settings, you can only use 1 gig per graphics, and where did the rest of the gig go? . Video card Ati Radeon HD 4870 x2. Thank you for your attention!)))

      Answers

      From the point of view of the OS, such a video card is actually not one with 2 GB, but two separate ones, each with 1 GB (even if they are physically one).

      In certain games, these two cards can work together (using Crossfire technology, which most likely needs to be enabled in the drivers), while the OS uses only one of the cards. This posting is provided «AS IS» with no warranties, and confers no rights.

      • Marked as answer by BlackDead.RUS January 3, 2010 7:26 AM

      All answers

      Most likely this is just a bad translation which means that the video card has 1024 MB of video memory.

      But even if we assume that the OS «eats» video memory, what is the actual problem? What programs do not work saying that «Not enough video memory»?

      This posting is provided «AS IS» with no warranties, and confers no rights.

      Dual core GPU is a code name similar to CPU. I just meant the mode in which 9 work0007 both HD 4870 x2 GPU cards (and, accordingly, both 1G video memory units). I have absolutely no idea whether, when connecting such a card, it is necessary to perform some manipulations (or settings in Bios) so that the card works in this mode, or it is installed automatically — I myself do not have such a powerful card. So personally I can’t help you

      Video card memory size or why 4 GB is not a «victory»

      Video memory size is the total memory capacity of the video card that stores the image for display on the monitor. Not always a large volume of a video card indicates its high performance. This is just a marketing ploy, so you need to pay attention to other important characteristics (memory type, bus width, etc.) when choosing a video card.

      The video memory function is the same as the «regular» memory that your PC uses. It is built into the graphics card and uses faster types of RAM such as GDDR5, GDDR5X, HBM2 and GDDR6.

      What is video memory

      You probably know that a graphics chip is responsible for rendering any image in a computer — for example, it calculates the interaction of objects in a game.

      Intermediate data, which is then displayed on the monitor, is stored just in the video memory. These blocks are connected to each other, by a data bus (you can read more about what it is, its bit depth and the impact on the operation of the device). 0007 here ).

      Modern graphics accelerators now use GDDR5 memory (with the exception of budget models, some of which still run on DDR3). In fact, this is the usual RAM that is in any PC.

      But unlike the RAM, the video memory board is soldered tightly, so there is absolutely no way to replace it without destroying the video card).

      Why is this solution implemented? Not for foolproof purposes, as you might think. This is done so that the user, who no longer has enough video memory to run some new product in the gaming industry, does not buy an additional memory module on the cheap, but buys a new fancy video card.

      Although, if you don’t believe in conspiracy theories, you can ignore my opinion.

      Display settings

      The first way to check the characteristics of interest is by using the monitor properties. In Windows 7, for this you need to right-click on the desktop and select «Screen Resolution» in the context menu.

      Click on the Advanced Settings link. The leftmost «Adapter» tab shows how much graphics memory is available and how much is currently in use.

      In Windows 10, right-click on the desktop and select Display Settings. At the bottom of the «Display» section there is a link «Advanced options». In the next window, we are interested in the link «Properties of the graphics adapter». The window that opens will display the same properties as described above.

      Bigger is better or not?

      The subject of comparative phallometry of ordinary users is often the amount of video memory. It happened at the suggestion of marketers — by vtyukhivaya new product, they will buzz your ears about it.

      More advanced users, especially gamers who have to sacrifice their personal time to indulge in their favorite hobby, pay attention, first of all, to the memory frequency (and, of course, to the core frequency).

      Why is that? It doesn’t matter how much data a graphics card can store — if it’s running slowly, even overclocking won’t always help to significantly increase performance in games.

      Graphics adapter parameters and interconnection of its elements

      Among people who are “on you” with a computer, one of the subject of comparative phallometry is the amount of video memory on the computer. I do not want to offend anyone, but the approach is completely lamer.

      I guarantee that the GTX 1060 with 3 GB of VRAM is much better at running games than the GTX 1050 Ti with 4 GB. It’s all about the characteristics, in which the novice user does not consider it necessary to understand.

      So, what does a video adapter consist of:

      • Graphics processor, or GPU.

      Its power, i.e. frequency, as well as the number of CUDA cores, determines how fast it will render graphics and, ultimately, what will be the FPS and rendering quality in games. The most important component around which engineers «dance» when selecting other components when designing a new model.

      • Video memory, or GDDR.

      Stores all intermediate data that the GPU processes. Its speed determines how quickly information will be written and read by the GPU. The volume determines how much data will fit at once.

      • Data bus.

      The channel through which the memory and graphics chip exchange information. From its width, or the so-called capacity, as a whole, depends on the efficiency of the components. With other good characteristics, but a narrow channel, the graphics will unobtrusively lag.

      Other components, such as external power supply and cooling system, I will not mention, since they do not relate to the topic under consideration.

      How much video memory is needed

      I won’t delve into how much video games have changed over the past 5 years — if you are «in the know», then you yourself can see everything perfectly. Such quality of graphics requires a powerful video card — if you want to play at acceptable settings, without suffering from «slideshow» during FPS drawdown.

      However, graphics quality is not the only problem that modern gamers face. In the gaming industry, it has become a good style to make games with an open seamless world (if the genre implies such a “feature” — for example, an RPG or a shooter).

      A game in which the user has to constantly wait for locations to load has a high chance of becoming a failure.

      To memorize all (or at least the nearest) objects of such a game world, a substantial amount of video memory is required. For modern games, the figure has become the norm from 3 GB.

      I don’t want to upset you, but this is only the case today — already in a couple of years, top-end video cards may not be able to pull new items at ultra-settings. What did you think?

      Alas, most developers are aimed at the mass consumer, so they focus on YOBA games, where for the sake of «graphics» you can sacrifice the rest of the components — the plot, thought out by the ENT, unusual quests that differ from the usual «kill everyone».

      The amount of video memory «for dummies»

      Careful selection of a video card is necessary for gamers or a certain type of specialist. But how to increase the amount of video memory for an ordinary user, so as not to delve too deeply into this topic? After all, there is absolutely no need to purchase flagship solutions for everyday tasks — fairly inexpensive, but quite good models.

      How much video memory is required to store an image? It is easy to calculate this parameter even for an ordinary user who is far from mathematics or IT. First, determine the required amount of video memory for graphics mode. You can calculate the minimum volume by multiplying the width of the image by its length (meaning the resolution of the diagonal) and by the bitmap.

      For example, if the monitor settings are 1920 x 1080 and the most common color quality is 32 bits, then one frame output will require: 1920 x 1080 x 32 = 8.3 MB. In general, the required amount of video memory depends on the type of user activity.

      To play on several screens at the same time, high-quality graphics are required, and it is worth understanding the parameters of video cards in more detail. It is recommended to give preference to those products that have more than 4 GB of video memory. And if the computer is used for «domestic» purposes — office work, study, watching movies, simple games — then the optimal amount is 1-2 GB.

      What conclusions can we draw

      I almost forgot, you don’t need to think about how to use all the video memory — in games it is used automatically, even if the system displays that there is less available.

      Based on the above, when choosing a video card, I advise, first of all, to focus on the memory frequency, ignoring the volume, if the upgrade budget is limited.

      And as a possible purchase, I can recommend the MSI GeForce GTX 1060 GAMING X 6G — an affordable device with 6 GB of video memory and very good other characteristics. I also advise you to read the article “Choosing a processor for a gaming system unit”.

      And that’s all for me. See you next time on my blog pages. Do not forget to subscribe to the newsletter and share publications on social networks!

      Yours faithfully, the author of the blog Andreev Andrey.

      Bigger is better?

      Many people mistakenly think that a larger amount of video memory always gives an increase in performance and that the system performance depends on it.

      We have to disappoint you, but this is not so. The performance of the chip itself plays a big role in performance. So an old high-end graphics card with a small amount of video memory can be significantly faster in games than a newer budget-level card with a lot of video memory. For example GT9800 with its 512 MB of video memory was faster than the GTS 240 with its 1024 MB.

      Undoubtedly, the memory subsystem in a video card is important. But the benefits from its volume will be only in the case when this volume was not enough before. That is, in operations that do not require a large amount of video memory, you will not notice any advantages.

      Video memory type:

      Modern video cards use the GDDR5 memory type, before that there were GDDR4, GDDR3, GDDR2, respectively. As you have already noticed, the names of the types of video memory are very similar to the names of the types of RAM (DDR2, DDR3), only the letter “G” has been added to them (GDDR5 — Graphics Double Data Rate 5). But if the names are similar, then the structure and functionality are significantly different. It should be understood that DDR3 type RAM cannot be equated with GDDR3 in terms of structure and functionality, it can rather be put in the same niche with GDDR5 (and even then partially)

      So what should I choose?

      In order to determine the amount of video memory you need, you must first determine your needs and budget.

      It should be noted that the integrated graphics in the processor uses the total RAM.
      Auxiliary table for choosing the amount of video memory

      Your needs Example video cards Required amount of video memory
      Multimedia and simple/old games

      * means that such solutions usually have a fixed amount of video memory, and professional video cards do not have versions from other manufacturers at all. It should also be noted that this table does not apply to the new Fiji chips from AMD (R9 Fury, R9 Nano), since they use the first generation HBM memory, which cannot exceed 4 GB, but has a very high bandwidth.

      If you want to learn more about NVIDIA Quadro and AMD FirePro, you can click on the appropriate links.

      Memory bus bandwidth:

      The memory bus bandwidth determines the amount of data transferred per unit of time. It is determined by the bus width and the clock speed of the memory.

      Accordingly, the greater the bit depth, the more efficient the operation of the entire video system will be. In modern video cards, the bus width ranges from 64 bits (for office computers) to 768 bits (for gaming systems and overclocking). Well, the memory frequency of modern video cards exceeds 1300 MHz.

      Memory bus bandwidth = memory clock x bus width. Let’s calculate the memory bus bandwidth, for example, for the AMD Radeon HD 7970 video card. The memory frequency of this device = 1375 MHz, but since the memory type is GDDR5, we multiply the real frequency by 4 and get an effective frequency of 5500 MHz. The memory bus width is 384 bits (48 bytes). With simple calculations we find: 5500 x 48 = 264 GB / s. So we found the bandwidth of the memory bus, which for this model is 264 GB / s. I note that this is one of the top video cards of this line and it is not cheap, so do not be alarmed if the performance of your video card, an older version, looks «faded» against the background of these results.

      Fig. AMD Radeon HD 7970

      How to allocate video card memory from windows 10 RAM

      Table of Contents

      1. How can I increase the memory capacity of the integrated graphics card? We launch any games
      2. Why increase the amount of video card memory?
      3. Can I increase the video memory on my computer?
      4. How can I increase the amount of video memory using the BIOS?
      5. How to enter the BIOS directly from Windows 10:
      6. Video RAM: How to increase the allocated video memory in Windows 10
      7. What is VRAM
      8. Check the amount of VRAM on the video card
      9. 2. Specify the amount of RAM for each program
      10. How to increase the allocated video memory in Windows 10
      11. What is VRAM about
      12. Why do you need VRAM?
      13. Increasing dedicated video RAM in Windows 10
      14. Check the amount of VRAM on your video card
      15. Increase allocated video RAM on your video card from BIOS
      16. Increase allocated video RAM on your video card using registry editor 10
      17. What is video memory?
      18. How much video memory do I have?
      19. What does integrated graphics mean?
      20. What applications require video memory?
      21. The right amount of video memory: basic recommendations
      22. Problems with video memory
      23. How to increase video memory
      24. Fake increase
      25. Now you understand what video memory is
      26. Video

      How to increase the amount of integrated video card? We launch any games

      Most computers and laptops have an integrated (built-in) graphics card. But for the operation of the video adapter, only a part of the RAM is used. Usually, a motherboard that has an integrated graphics card allows you to adjust the amount of RAM allocated for the needs of graphics processing.

      Why increase the amount of video card memory?

      Usually the purpose of increasing the amount of video memory is to run more demanding applications that are impossible or difficult to run with the current configuration of the PC or laptop, because the video card runs out of memory. As a rule, this is done when trying to start a game. However, the speed of performing tasks in the process of working with some graphic editors like Photoshop also depends on the amount of video memory.

      In addition, you need to understand that the amount of RAM allocated for the needs of the graphics card cannot be used for other tasks until the settings are changed. Simply put, if an application requires 2 GB of RAM and 512 MB of video memory, while 2 GB is absolutely the entire amount of RAM, then after the “transfer” there will still be 512 MB left, which means that the characteristics will still fall short of necessary requirements, but already due to lack of RAM. So before increasing the available video memory, make sure you have at least 4GB of RAM at your disposal.

      Can I increase the video memory on my computer?

      As a rule, the function that allows you to increase the amount of video memory is present only on those configurations where there is an integrated video card (although there are exceptions). If the computer has an external (discrete) video adapter installed, then it is unlikely that it will be possible to increase the amount of memory — the function is available only for a fairly small number of graphic devices.

      In addition, most laptop owners mistakenly believe that they have an integrated graphics card. Although in fact, more and more often they are equipped with discrete ones.

      Based on this, the first thing needs to know for sure is whether the device has an integrated video card or a discrete . In Windows, this can be done in a completely standard way using the «Device Manager»:

      in the «Run» window that opens, enter the command devmgmt. msc click «OK»;

      How to increase the amount of video memory using the BIOS?

      . But you can use two other methods:

      A way to enter the BIOS directly from Windows 10:

      Now in the BIOS settings you need to find the option that is responsible for allocating RAM for the needs of the video adapter. At the same time, please note that depending on the model of the motherboard and the BIOS firmware version, the option may have a different name. Absolutely the same applies to the structure of the user interface — the location can be different.

      Before you start making changes, we recommend that you study the characteristics of the motherboard. But in any case, you need:

      ), exit the BIOS control panel and restart the computer.

      For more powerful video adapters, there is another option — the MSI Afterburner program. Thanks to it, you can gradually increase the clock frequency of the processor of a discrete graphics card and thereby increase performance. But, as with the BIOS, if you decide to manipulate the graphics adapter’s memory, always be careful. Indeed, due to excessive load, the device may refuse to work, and the computer will enter the eternal reboot mode. In this case, you should reduce the parameters or even return to the base ones.

      Source

      Video RAM: How to Increase Dedicated Video RAM in Windows 10

      Computer memory plays a vital role in quickly accessing apps and programs. Computer memory or RAM is used by the system processor to store data. This is the volatile memory on the motherboard that stores the operating system and programs for quick access. Your system processor continuously loads data from the hard disk into RAM before execution. But sometimes you may need a buffer for high quality videos, video editors, 3D structures and a new game on your PC.

      What is VRAM

      Graphics-intensive applications and programs use a large amount of system memory to render graphic data with high quality, color, clarity, and definition. In these cases, your system may run out of RAM and struggle to buffer high-intensity graphics programs as your graphics card shares system memory. If you don’t need to buffer high quality video applications, your PC runs fine with RAM. Otherwise, you need a special type of memory called 9 to buffer a high-quality visual display to the monitor.0007 Video RAM (VRAM) .

      Video memory is designed for special processing of high intensity video faster than system RAM. Graphics cards or the graphics processor use video memory (VRAM) built into it to store images and video data. VRAM is also called virtual RAM and is used as GPU memory to easily handle graphics applications, games, complex textures, and 3D graphics.

      In the latest games and videos, you may need to play 1080p or 4k video, which requires a lot of VRAM. Also, VRAM processes more pixels for higher resolution images to display them better. At the same time, modern games require more detail and exact system requirements to run them on your monitor, and having insufficient VRAM will lead to a large overload of the GPU.

      If you don’t have enough VRAM, you won’t be able to run modern games. In this case, you will need a high-performance graphics card to easily load complex textures with high-resolution images.

      Check the amount of VRAM on the video card

      Step 1 . Open « Options» > « System » > « Display » and on the right select « Additional display options «.

      Step 2 . In the new window, select « Display adapter properties for display».

      How to increase Video RAM from BIOS

      This is the recommended method for reallocating VRAM. However, this does not work on all motherboards and you are not allowed to reallocate memory on your PC yourself. However, you can try changing the BIOS settings and check if you have sufficient rights to change the amount of allocated video memory on your PC.

      You must understand that BIOS settings are different for everyone, and sometimes BIOSes have advanced settings that do not show all the settings by default. Use Google or Yandex «image search» by entering the motherboard model there.

      Step 2 . Once you have chosen the value you need, be sure to save the BIOS settings by pressing F10.

      Source

      Memory allocation for video card from windows 10 9 RAM0005

      One of the most interesting and useful features of Windows 10 is the prioritization of each running process. Every program that runs on Windows has a priority level that determines how much resources it will consume when running multiple programs. What’s even more useful is that Windows 10 allows you to change the priority of running processes.

      Let’s say there are times when we want to allocate more RAM for a particular application. By allocating more RAM to a running process, you can speed up video conversion time, fix web browser lag, speed up a program, and more.

      It’s also worth noting that some apps and games were designed to use more RAM, so allocating more RAM to those particular apps or games will allow them to run smoothly.

      In this article, we will share a detailed guide on how to allocate more RAM to certain applications on Windows 10 computers.

      1. Using the Task Manager

      You can use the Windows 10 Task Manager to prioritize certain applications. If you want to allocate extra RAM to any particular application, you need to increase its priority in the Task Manager. To do this, follow a few simple steps below.

      Step 1. First of all, right click on the taskbar and select Task Manager .

      Step 2. After «Task Manager» opens, select the tab «Details» .

      Step 3. On the Details tab , right-click the process you want to increase the priority of and select the Set Priority option .

      Step 4. You will find several options. To increase priority, select something higher than normal. You can select Above Average , High or Real Time .

      Step 5. In the confirmation field, press «Change priority» .

      So you can use Task Manager to allocate more RAM to certain apps in Windows 10.

      2. Specify the amount of RAM for each program

      In this method, we are going to specify the amount of RAM for each program. This method works with all applications, but we used Adobe Photoshop for the demonstration.

      Step 1. First of all, right-click the application shortcut and select Properties .

      Step 2. Now go to tab «Shortcut» .

      Step 3. In the Target field, copy and paste —disk-cache-size=1073741824 at the very end. After that, press «OK» .

      Important! Performing the above action will allocate 1073741824 bytes to Adobe Photoshop, equivalent to 1 GB of RAM. You can change the size, but the amount of RAM must be in bytes.

      Windows 10 usually does a good job of managing RAM. The system knows very well how much memory to allocate to each application. Allocating too much RAM to any application may cause other applications to crash or some errors to appear.

      Source

      How to increase dedicated video memory in Windows 10

      Computer memory plays an important role in quick access to applications and programs. Computer memory or RAM is used by the system processor to store data. This is a volatile memory on the motherboard that stores the operating system and system programs for easy access. Your system processor continuously loads data from the hard drive into RAM before execution. But sometimes you may need to buffer high quality video, video editors, 3D structures and a new game on your PC.

      What VRAM is all about

      Video memory is dedicated to special high-intensity video processing faster than system memory. Video cards or graphics processors use the video memory (VRAM) built into it to store images and video data. VRAM is also called virtual RAM and is used as GPU memory for simple processing of graphics applications, games, complex textures, and 3D graphics.

      However, some applications, such as the latest games and videos, may require 1080p or 4k video playback, which requires a lot of video memory. Also, VRAM processes more pixels for higher resolution images to display them better. At the same time, modern games require increased detail and exact system requirements to run them on the system monitor, and the lack of VRAM will lead to a large overload of the GPU.

      Why do you need VRAM?

      If you don’t have enough VRAM, you won’t be able to run modern games. In this case, you will need a graphics card with more video memory. To easily load complex textures with high-resolution images, you may need to increase the amount of dedicated video memory on your video card.

      Increasing Dedicated Video RAM in Windows 10

      Next, we will explain how to change the amount of video RAM on your Windows 10 system. You can reallocate system RAM as dedicated video RAM on a Windows PC either through BIOS settings or through registry settings.

      Check the amount of VRAM on your graphics card

      Before trying out ways to increase VRAM, you first need to check how much dedicated video memory your graphics card has in Windows 10.

      Go to Start menu and click Settings. Go to System and click Display on the left sidebar of System Preferences.

      Scroll down the Display menu and select parameter Display adapter properties at the bottom of the window.

      Increase the allocated video memory on your video card from the BIOS

      This is the recommended method for reallocating VRAM allocation memory. However, this does not work for all motherboards and you may not be allowed to reallocate memory on your PC alone. However, you can try to change the BIOS settings and check if you have enough rights to change the amount of allocated video memory on your PC.

      Restart your computer and press the BIOS key — F2, F5, F8 or Del keys several times during boot.

      In BIOS menu , go to Advanced Features or similar.

      Adjust the setting that best suits your application. The default amount of memory allocated to the GPU is typically 128 MB. You can increase the preallocated VRAM to 256MB or 512MB.

      Save changes and restart the system.

      Increase the allocated video memory on your video card using the registry editor

      Depending on the applications you run, the system automatically adjusts the required amount of video memory. And therefore, the adapted information showing the amount of VRAM used on your video card is not always reliable. However, some applications will require more VRAM to run. In this case, you can simply copy the amount of VRAM to replace the amount of VRAM your system needs to run the application. You don’t increase the value for real, but you increase the amount of VRAM to a value that will replace the memory requirements to run the game or application.

      Open Run and type regedit. Navigate to the following path:

      Select the new GMM folder in the left sidebar.

      Right-click on the right side of the window and select New from the drop-down menu.

      Select Dword (32-bit) and name it DedicatedSegmentSize.

      Source

      Memory allocation for video card from windows 10 9 RAM0005

      Have you experienced video memory errors on your Windows PC? Trouble running graphics programs such as video editors and new video games? If yes, then you may need more video memory.

      But what is it and how can you increase it? In this article, I will share everything I know about video memory with you, so read on!

      What is video memory?

      Although technically incorrect, the terms GPU and graphics card are often used interchangeably.

      Your video memory contains information about what the GPU needs, such as game textures and lighting effects. This allows the GPU to quickly access information and display video on the monitor. Using video RAM for this task is much faster than using your RAM as video RAM sits next to the GPU on the graphics card and is built for this high intensive purpose.

      How much video memory do I have?

      You can easily view the amount of video memory you have in Windows 10 by following these steps:

      you have a device. If you see AMD Accelerated Processing Unit or Intel HD Graphics (most likely), you are using integrated graphics.

      What does integrated graphics mean?

      An integrated graphics solution means that the GPU is at the same level as the processor and uses regular system memory instead of using its own dedicated VRAM. This is a low cost solution and allows laptops to output basic graphics without the need for a space and power safe graphics card. But integrated graphics are ill-suited for gaming and graphical tasks.

      How powerful your integrated graphics is depends on your processor. The new processors with Intel Iris Plus graphics are more powerful than their cheaper, older counterparts, but still pale in comparison to dedicated graphics.

      With integrated graphics, you should have no problem watching videos, playing games at low intensity, and using basic photo and video editing applications. However, it is basically impossible to play the latest graphically impressive games with integrated graphics.

      What tasks do you need video memory for?

      Before I go into specific numbers, I should mention which aspects of games and other graphics intensive applications use a lot of VRAM.

      A big factor in VRAM consumption is the resolution of your monitor. Video memory stores a framebuffer that contains the image before and during the time your GPU renders it on the screen. More powerful displays (such as games on a 4K screen) take up more VRAM because higher resolution images take up more pixels to display.

      In addition to your display, the textures in your game can greatly affect the amount of VRAM you need. Most modern PC games allow you to fine-tune performance or image quality. You can play the game in Low or Medium mode with a cheaper card (or even integrated graphics). But high or ultra quality, or custom mods that make the textures inside the game look even better than the developers intended, will require a lot of RAM.

      Decorative features such as anti-aliasing also use more VRAM due to the extra pixels. If you’re playing on two monitors at the same time, it’s even more intense.

      Specific games may also require different amounts of VRAM. A game like Overwatch isn’t too demanding on graphics, but a game with lots of modern lighting effects and detailed textures like Assassin’s Creed Origins requires more resources.

      Conversely, a cheap card with 2 GB of VRAM (or integrated graphics) is enough to play old PC games or emulate retro consoles.

      Back then, games didn’t have more than 2 GB of VRAM.

      Even if you are not interested in games, some popular programs also require a significant amount of VRAM. 3D design software like AutoCAD, especially heavy editing in Photoshop, and high quality video editing will suffer if you don’t have enough video memory.

      The Right Amount of VRAM: Basic Recommendations

      I hope it’s clear that there is no perfect amount of VRAM for everyone. However, I can provide some basic guidance on how much VRAM you should have in your graphics card.

      Graphic card manufacturers add the appropriate amount of VRAM to the card depending on how powerful the GPU is. So a cheap graphics card will have a small amount of VRAM, while an expensive graphics card will have a lot more.

      Video memory problems

      Remember that, like conventional RAM, more VRAM does not always mean better performance. If your card has 4GB of VRAM and you’re playing a game that only uses 2GB, upgrading to an 8GB card won’t make much of a difference.

      Remember that VRAM is only one of the performance factors. If you don’t have a powerful processor, it will take a long time to render HD video. The lack of system memory prevents you from running multiple programs at once, and using a mechanical hard drive will severely limit your system’s performance. And some cheaper graphics cards can use slower DDR3 VRAM, which is inferior to DDR5.

      How to increase video memory

      They should contain an option to configure how much memory you allocate to the GPU. The default is usually 128MB, try increasing it to 256MB or 512MB if you have enough to spare. However, not every processor or BIOS has this setting. If you can’t change it, there is a workaround that might help you.

      Fake magnification

      Since most integrated graphics solutions are automatically configured to use the required amount of RAM, the details listed in the Adapter Properties window do not matter much. In fact, for integrated graphics, the value of dedicated video memory is completely fictitious. The system reports a bogus value so that games see something when they check how much VRAM you have.

      So you can change the registry value to change the amount of VRAM your system tells games. It doesn’t actually increase your VRAM, it just changes this bogus value. If the game won’t launch because you don’t have enough VRAM, raising this value may fix the problem.

      Open the Registry Editor window by typing «regedit» into the Run window. Remember that you can mess up your system in the registry, so be careful while you’re here.

      Head to the following location:

      These methods aren’t guaranteed to work, but they’re still worth a try if you run into problems. If you don’t have much system memory and are having trouble playing games with integrated graphics, try adding more RAM to use the integrated graphics.

      Now you understand what video memory is

      Do you have a dedicated video card or are you using integrated graphics? Have you ever encountered a VRAM related error? Write it in the comments!

      Source

      Video

      HOW TO OPTIMIZE RAM/RAM/RAM/RAM FOR GAMES | INCREASING FPS IN GAMES 2020

      HOW TO INCREASE VIDEO MEMORY ON YOUR VIDEO CARD

      How to increase Intel HD and AMD video memory with RAM

      HOW TO BOOST AND FREE RAM Windows 10 Pro? 100{92d76c10834eca4fdb19b8083bcd468712b82372

      6147213406b72120dae} lifehack for RAM

      😱 ACCELERATE RAM (RAM) TO THE LIMIT | Windows 10 | Windows 7

      How to increase the memory of an integrated (built-in) video card and why you need it!

      What will EXPAND VIDEO MEMORY with RAM?

      (Working) How to increase the video memory of the integrated Intel chip

      How to optimize Windows 10? Increase paging files

      Add memory to the built-in video card

      How to see the amount of memory of a video card in Windows 10

      Contents

      1. How to find out the amount of memory of a video card, its type, and other characteristics
      2. Find out the characteristics of the video card
      3. Using DxDiag (DirectX diagnostic tools)
      4. Using the parameters and properties of the screen Utilities (extended information)
      5. Speccy
      6. AIDA-64
      7. How to find out the amount of video card memory on Windows 10
      8. What affects the amount of video memory
      9. How to see the amount of video memory
      10. DirectX diagnostic tool
      11. 166 Classic Task Manager

      12. Radeon Software Settings
      13. NVIDIA Control Panel
      14. TechPowerUp GPU-Z Utility
      15. AIDA64 Extreme Edition
      16. How much video memory is needed for games
      17. Find out the amount of video card memory and its type using OC memory
      18. View
      19. NVIDIA Control Panel
      20. AMD Radeon Control Panel
      21. Via DirectX Diagnostic Tool
      22. Advanced Display Settings
      23. Find out how many GB on the video card using third-party programs
      24. How to find out how much memory is in the video card on Windows 10?
      25. How to find out how many GB is on a Windows 10 video card?
      26. How to see the amount of RAM on Windows 10?
      27. How do I increase video memory in Windows 10?
      28. How can I find out which memory manufacturer is on the video card?
      29. How to find out how many GB are on a laptop?
      30. Is it possible to increase the amount of memory on the video card?
      31. How to find out the amount of RAM in the BIOS?
      32. How can I find out how much RAM my computer is using?
      33. How can I check the amount of free memory on my computer?
      34. How do I clear video memory on Windows 10?
      35. How do I increase the amount of memory on an Intel HD Graphics card?
      36. How do I increase the allocated video memory in Windows 7?
      37. How can I find out how much memory is on the video card?
      38. How to find out who is the manufacturer of RAM chips?
      39. How can I find out what manufacturer of RAM I have?
      40. How do I view graphics card settings on Windows 10?
      41. Video

      How to find out the amount of video card memory, its type and other characteristics

      themselves, with the help of test results).

      In addition, computer games depend not only on the operation of the video card: it is not uncommon when they slow down due to the “abnormal” operation of the hard drive. In general, I have a separate article on my blog about brakes and lags in games. I recommend!

      Okay lyrics, now specifically on the topic of the question.

      Find out the characteristics of the video card

      Using DxDiag (DirectX diagnostic tool)

      Pluses of the method: nothing needs to be downloaded and installed into the system; works in all versions of Windows; It only takes 10 seconds to view the properties. time!

      Run the DirectX diagnostic tool (DxDiag)

      Through the settings and properties of the screen

      Advantages of the method: no need to install anything; fast; minimum «digging» in hardware and software.

      Cons: you can not find out anything if you do not have video drivers installed in your system.

      Some of the menus may vary slightly depending on the version of Windows (I’ll use the newest Windows 10 as an example).

      Next, you need to open the link «Properties of the graphics adapter» (see screenshot below). In some versions of Windows, there may simply be a «Properties» link.

      Graph properties adapter

      Actually, opening the properties, it remains only to see how much memory is available, how much is used, etc.

      With the help of special. utilities (extended information)

      Advantages of the method: they will show information even if you do not have drivers or there are errors in Windows; you can find out much more information: type of memory, exact model of the video card, frequencies, etc.

      Quite a small utility, but extremely useful. Allows you to find out almost all those. specifications about the processor, RAM and video card. In my opinion, it is very informative, moreover, it works even in cases where other programs refuse or give errors.

      After downloading and running it, you need:

      Speccy

      If this information is not enough, or nothing is displayed for you, open the «Graphics Devices» tab. Next, you will see the detailed properties of your graphics card:

      AIDA-64

      One of the most famous utilities for viewing computer characteristics (by the way, it replaced the once popular Everest).

      Pros: very informative (you can find out all the ins and outs of the computer). Works even if drivers are not installed.

      After launching AIDA-64, open the «Display» section, then the «Windows Video» and «GPU» tabs. They contain comprehensive information about all video cards installed on your PC (laptop).

      Source

      How to find out the amount of video card memory on Windows 10

      First of all, users are interested in seeing how many megabytes / gigabytes the installed video card is. They also look at the amount of memory when choosing a video card. Therefore, from a marketing point of view, it is beneficial for sales to install a lot of video memory.

      This article will tell you how to find out the amount of video card memory on Windows 10. You can see how many gigabytes of memory are available, what type and actual memory is used, the frequency of memory and cores. It is important not only to look at the amount of memory, but also to see other characteristics.

      What affects the amount of video memory

      Video memory is used to store textures, models, buffers and other graphics data. Much depends on the quality of the GPU: write and read bandwidth. It is worth considering the operating frequencies, bandwidth.

      I recently purchased an ASUS STRIX RX580 8 GB graphics card. It fully corresponds to the ratio of price and quality. And its power is more than enough for a comfortable game in FullHD. Even now, in well-optimized games, 4 GB is no longer enough.

      For example, the GeForce GTX 1060 video card was produced in two versions of 3 or 6 GB. This is exactly the case when it is recommended to take the 6 GB version. In games already 3 GB is not enough. The processor has to save data to slower RAM.

      How to view the amount of video memory

      DirectX Diagnostic Tool

      This tool provides detailed information about installed DirectX components and drivers. Run the tool by running command dxdiag in window Win+R . Now go to Screen and look for Device > Display Memory (Video Memory).

      Graphics adapter properties

      Go to location Settings > System > Display . Now select Advanced display settings > Display adapter properties for display 1 . In the properties of the video adapter, see how much Video memory is used .

      Classic Task Manager

      Performance section has been improved in the Task Manager. Press the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Esc . Now go to section Performance > GPU . Below, see the value Shared GPU Memory .

      Radeon Software

      settings

      Open Radeon software by selecting the appropriate item in the context menu of the desktop or taskbar tray. Now go to location Settings > System . See section Hardware for value Available memory (Video memory).

      NVIDIA Control Panel

      Open NVIDIA Control Panel in the taskbar tray or context menu by selecting it. Select System Information and view the value of Dedicated Video Memory . Here you will find all the detailed information about NVIDIA hardware and Windows 10.

      TechPowerUp GPU-Z utility

      All graphics card specifications are collected in TechPowerUp GPU-Z. The utility can be used without installation (portable version). In the program window, look at the value Memory Size — Memory Size (it shows the total amount of video memory available on this adapter).

      AIDA64 Extreme Edition

      It can be found in every second article due to its wide functionality. See how to use AIDA64 Extreme for more details. For example, go to section Display > Video Windows , and find the parameter Video RAM size .

      How much video memory is needed for games

      On the example of the PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds game, you can see the following test results. It requires a lot of video memory at the maximum graphics settings (ultra). Lowering the graphics may slightly improve the situation.

      PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds

      Source

      Find out the amount of video card memory and its type

      The amount of video card memory and its type are one of the most important characteristics of a computer. It is the amount of on-board (own) memory of the video card of a stationary PC or laptop that is a key parameter when running computer games and demanding programs, especially at high resolutions. There are many ways to find out how much memory on a video card costs. I will show and tell only about the most simple and informative.

      View video card memory using OC

      Now there are 2 players on the market for discrete (external) video cards. These are NVIDIA and AMD (produces video accelerators under the Radeon brand). Both manufacturers, when installing video card drivers, install centers for managing its parameters. There you can find basic information on the installed video adapter.

      NVIDIA Control Panel

      It can be opened by clicking on the nvidia

      icon on the lower right side of the Windows Control Panel or by right-clicking anywhere on the desktop and selecting NVIDIA Control Panel.

      Next, follow the link » System Information

      «And find the parameter» Dedicated video memory«. This will be our desired megabytes or gigabytes installed on the video card, as well as their type.

      Control panel AMD Radeon

      Here, all actions are absolutely identical when working with the NVIDIA panel.

      Through the DirectX diagnostic tool

      Press search

      and enter dxdiag into the line and press execute command on the application that appears. You can also call the command line by pressing the Win + R keys. Works for all versions of Windows.

      Go to the «Screen» tab and find the «Display memory (video memory)» parameter. Opposite it will be written how much memory is on the video accelerator.

      My memory size is not displayed correctly. It should be 2048, not 2007. I haven’t figured out the reason yet. If anyone has or had similar glitches, write why this happens.

      Additional display settings

      Find out how many GB on the video card using third-party programs

      I consider GPU-Z from the developer TechPowerUp to be the simplest and most convenient program for viewing the amount and type of on-board memory of a video card. All video accelerator parameters are visible on one tab. For each hover option, a brief explanation is given. You can take a screenshot of the characteristics immediately from the program.

      Sometimes it is necessary to find out the manufacturer of the graphics card memory. GPU-Z does a good job of this as well. On the Memory Type tab, opposite the type of memory, its manufacturer is indicated in brackets.

      Also, by all of the above methods, you can find out the amount of video card memory on a laptop.

      Source

      How to find out how much memory is in the video card on Windows 10?

      To do this, open the «Start» menu and in the «Run» field, type «dxdiag.exe». In the window that opens, go to the second tab called «Monitor». The «Total memory» line shows the amount of RAM your video card has.

      How to find out how many GB is on a Windows 10 video card?

      Advanced display settings

      How to see the amount of RAM on Windows 10?

      How to increase video memory in Windows 10?

      Scroll down and click Advanced display settings text. From the menu that appears, select the monitor you want to view the settings for (if necessary). Then click the Display Adapter Properties text at the bottom. In the new window, you will see the current video memory next to Dedicated video memory.

      How can I find out which memory manufacturer is on the video card?

      Click the Windows icon in the lower left corner of the screen, or press the appropriate button on your keyboard and open the Utilities tab. Open one by one: Control Panel / Hardware and Sound / Device Manager / Display adapters and all installed video cards will be displayed in front of you.

      How to find out how many GB are on a laptop?

      Press the Win+R keys on your keyboard (the Win key is the OS logo key), the Run dialog box will open, type msinfo32 into it and press Enter. The System Information window will launch. In it, in the first tab, you will see the item «Installed RAM» and its size in GB.

      Is it possible to increase the amount of memory on the video card?

      How to increase the memory of the video card

      How can I find out the amount of RAM in the BIOS?

      How can I find out how much RAM my computer is using?

      To find out how much RAM is being used: In Windows, use the Task Manager utility by right-clicking on an empty area of ​​the taskbar.

      How can I check the amount of free memory on my computer?

      To find the amount of installed and available memory in Windows 7, follow these steps.

      How to clear video memory on Windows 10?

      Select System, then click Display on the left sidebar. Scroll down and click on the text «graphics adapter properties». In the window that appears, go to the «Adapter» tab and look at the «Adapter Information» section. You will see the current video memory listed next to the allocated video memory.

      How do I increase the amount of memory on an Intel HD Graphics card?

      You can also call the Display settings command from the Desktop context menu. In the first tab, scroll down and click on the Advanced Display Settings link. At the bottom, click Display 1 Video Adapter Properties. Under Video Memory Used, you can see the amount of memory for the Intel HD Graphics.

      How do I increase the allocated video memory in Windows 7?

      If you are using Windows 7, right-click on the desktop and select Screen Resolution. In the Screen Resolution section, click Advanced Options. Click the Adapters tab at the top. The line «Dedicated video memory» will appear on the tab.

      How can I find out how much memory is on the video card?

      To do this, open the «Start» menu and in the «Run» field, type «dxdiag.exe». In the window that opens, go to the second tab called «Monitor». The «Total memory» line shows the amount of RAM your video card has.

      How to find out who is the manufacturer of RAM chips?

      Finding out the characteristics of the RAM chip is quite simple.

      Memory manufacturer identification

      How can I find out what manufacturer of RAM I have?

      The easiest way to do this is as follows:

      Source

      How to view video card settings on Windows 10?

      Hello everyone A video card is probably more important device even than a processor, but here I mean, of course, if you like to play a computer. It is for the gamer that the video card is the most important in the computer, but the processor, the main thing is not to be the weakest.

      But how can I view graphics card settings in Windows 10? I will say right away that the built-in capabilities of Windows 10 are poor in terms of providing information, it is better to use third-party programs. But I’ll write all the ways that I know

      So, the first way to find out the video card settings in Windows 10: right-click on the desktop, select Display settings there:

      Then in the window, click Advanced display settings:

      Further at the very bottom of the window it will be like this as Graphics adapter properties, click this:

      After that you will see a small window, these are the properties of your graphics adapter. Since I have a Pentium G3220 processor and there is no separate video card, I have information about the integrated graphics core in the processor here:

      That’s where it says Adapter Type, here you can see what model you have. Well, below, there are already a few characteristics.

      In general, this is a method without using any programs. Now let’s look at another way, no programs are also needed here, but the method is a little unusual … OK, then the System Information window will already open, and there you need to open the Display section:

      As you can see, there is some information here, but it can hardly be called detailed. However, to understand what kind of model and what amount of video memory — it is possible that for many it will be enough. For example, you can copy the model and go to the search engine, and there you can already find a lot of information ..

      Well, now how to view the parameters of the Windows 10 video adapter using some programs. The free and best utility in my opinion is TechPowerUp GPU-Z. It is easy to find on the Internet and it does not seem to require installation, I downloaded it from the official site and it started without installing. This is what she showed me:

      There seems to be all the information you need here, and some kind of model and shaders and frequency, in general, a lot of detailed information, which is not all clear to me …

      The second program that I recommend is AIDA64. She is already known to many, but if you don’t know about her, then I’ll say that you should get to know her, at least so that you understand how necessary this program is. And the thing is that I have not seen a more powerful program that provides so much information about hardware. About any device and the most detailed information. Well, for example, you can even find out in it when the RAM bar was released, so I advise

      Well, what about the parameters of the video card, all this can be found in the section Display > Graphic processor:

      As you can see, there is a lot of information here, there is even a version of WDDM, DirectX. For additional information, you can also look at the Windows Video section, PCI / AGP Video (I understand that this section works with a separate video card).

      AIDA64 also has another strong point — temperature display. You can view the temperature of all devices such as processor, video cards, hard drives and others. All this can be seen on the tab Computer > Sensors

      In general, as for me, the best option to find out the parameters of the video adapter in Windows 10 is to use the TechPowerUp GPU-Z utility. It was created by the same developer as CPU-Z, so the utility is of high quality, there is no doubt. If you need a lot of information on hardware and not only about the video adapter, then of course AIDA64, this is a time-tested program. Previously, it was also called something like Aida32, and then Everest … I didn’t write at all, AIDA64 is a paid program, but you can use it for free for a month.

      Well, that’s all, I hope that everything was clear to you here and the info was useful. Good luck and all the best! see the video card on windows 10. How to find out your video card

      Find out the amount of RAM, video memory and hard drive size

      0003

      How to find out how much video memory is on a video card?

      where to see the amount of memory, 9 options

      A computer is a complex device that consists of many components. Along with the central processor, the graphics adapter plays a decisive role. As the name suggests, it is designed for graphics processing. So every PC owner should have information about the GPU model, and also understand how to find out the video card memory on the Windows 10 operating system. This is another important characteristic that needs to be considered in conjunction with the clock speed.

      CONTENTS OF THE ARTICLE:

      What affects the amount of video memory

      First, let’s fix the information about what a video card is. In simple terms, this is a separate processor responsible for processing graphics. But if a standard CPU uses RAM to solve its problems, then the graphics adapter takes resources from its own memory.

      The amount of VRAM is a value that shows how much graphic information a computer can process per unit of time. That is, the more video memory, the faster the PC will cope with video rendering and image processing, and will also behave more stable in games.

      Note. Video cards are built-in and discrete. The former, due to the lack of their own memory, use RAM.

      How to recognize it

      The need to obtain information about the characteristics of the video card, including the amount of memory, did not appear today. This is extremely important information that allows you to understand what the computer is capable of when performing certain tasks.

      There are many ways to get acquainted with information about video memory, and the choice of a specific means of obtaining information directly depends on the needs of the user, as well as the technical equipment of the PC. It is recommended to study all the methods in order to choose the most optimal for yourself.

      DirectX

      DirectX is a library of software components that allow you to use all the capabilities of a video card to solve various problems (most often to ensure comfortable gaming). The library has its own diagnostic tool that provides information about the graphics adapter, including video memory. To find out the amount of VRAM, you must follow the following instructions:

      • Hold down the «Win» + «R» keys to launch the «Run» window.
      • Enter the query «dxdiag».
      • Press the OK button or the Enter key.
      • In the window that opens, go to the «Screen» tab.
      • Here we will be interested in the «Display Memory» item, where the amount of VRAM is presented.

      The resulting information can be copied into a separate document to always stay up to date with the characteristics of the graphics card. The DirectX Diagnostic Tool can also help you analyze other aspects of your graphics card.

      Graphics card properties

      Almost every computer has a DirectX diagnostic tool, but if we imagine that it is not on your PC, then there are many other ways to find out the amount of video memory to choose from. In particular, you can use the standard application «Settings»:

      • Launch the «Start» menu by clicking LMB on the corresponding icon, or by pressing the «Win» key.
      • Open Settings by clicking the gear icon.
      • Go to System and then Display.
      • LMB click on «Advanced display settings», and in the next step open «Display adapter properties».

      You will see a window containing information about the graphics adapter model and other important characteristics. Pay attention to the item «Used video memory». This is the information you were looking for.

      Task Manager

      In Windows 10, Task Manager is not just a process management tool, but also an advanced diagnostic tool. It analyzes the operation of the computer, showing the level of loading, and also provides information about the PC. To get information about video memory, do the following:

      • Hold down the keys «Ctrl» + «Shift» + «Esc» or open the «Task Manager» in any other way convenient for you.
      • Click the «Performance» tab and then «GPU».
      • Pay attention to the «GPU shared memory» item.

      Do not confuse the indicated line with other items like «GPU RAM» and «Dedicated memory …». These are other parameters that, although related to video memory, are not of comparable importance.

      Radeon Software 9 Setup0096

      Laptops and desktops come with graphics cards from different manufacturers that release their own software for their components. First, let’s talk about the AMD graphics adapter information tool. It was called Radeon Software. To find out the amount of VRAM, use the instruction:

      • Launch the Radeon Software (you can refer to the help of the Windows search bar).
      • Open the settings by clicking LMB on the gear.
      • Go to the System section.

      This menu will provide all the necessary information about the video card. The amount of memory is given in the «Hardware» section. At the same time, it is important to replace that along with the characteristics of the GPU, information from the CPU is indicated here, so be careful.

      NVIDIA Control Panel

      Owners of NVIDIA graphics cards can also view the amount of VRAM. A special control panel has been developed for them, access to which is opened as follows:

      • Right-click on an empty area of ​​the desktop.
      • Open the NVIDIA Control Panel.
      • Click LMB on the «System Information» inscription located in the lower left corner of the interface.
      • Review the information provided.

      Help. You can open the NVIDIA Control Panel in the same way as the standard AMD tool, that is, through the Windows search bar. In addition, the application shortcut is located on the desktop or in the taskbar.

      Even though the NVIDIA application has an obsolete design, this should not prevent you from getting the necessary information. You just need to carefully study the information and find the «Video Memory» item.

      TechPowerUp GPU-Z

      The amount of memory allocated for the needs of the video card, as well as other information about the graphics adapter and the computer as a whole, is presented in the TechPowerUp GPU-Z application. This is a third-party software that collects information about a PC and then presents it in a readable format. The program is distributed free of charge, and you can download it from almost any site dedicated to electronics. But it is best to do this on the official resource of the developers.

      The application interface is very simple. Even the absence of Russian-language localization should not cause serious problems for the user. After launching TechPowerUp GPU-Z, the PC owner will see four tabs:

      • «Graphics Card»;
      • Sensors;
      • «Advanced»;
      • Validation.

      Of course, we will be interested in the first item, or rather, the “Memory Size” sub-item. This indicates the amount of VRAM that is responsible for processing graphics when the computer performs certain resource-intensive tasks. In addition, the Graphics Card section provides a host of other useful information that is not available in standard Windows 10 tools and applications from graphics card manufacturers.

      AIDA64 Extreme Edition

      A similar but much more popular program for getting acquainted with the characteristics of a computer. AIDA64 is in great demand among people around the world, and therefore it will not be difficult for you to find a Russian-language version. The app’s interface is reminiscent of Device Manager, but the Windows 10 classic tool doesn’t have video memory information. Here she is, as you know. For information you need:

      • Download and install AIDA64 on your computer.
      • Launch an application.
      • Expand the Display tab.
      • LMB click on «Windows Video».

      Several fields will be presented on the right side of the window. The item you are looking for is “Video RAM Size”. Opposite it is the storage capacity, expressed in gigabytes.

      Speccy

      Another third-party application that can give odds to the standard diagnostic tools and obtain information about the characteristics of Windows 10. By analogy with the previously discussed Speccy programs, you can download it to your computer for free. But from the conditional AIDA64 Speccy will be distinguished by the fact that there is no Russian-language interface.

      It will not hurt to get information about VRAM:

      • Run the application after installation.
      • Go to the «Graphics» section.
      • Wait for the system scan to finish.

      After a few seconds, several tabs will appear in the «Graphics» field, among which you need to select the item with the name of the video card. All the characteristics of the graphics adapter will be presented below, and information about the amount of memory will be displayed in the «Memory» line.

      Search for information on the official website

      Trust in the source of information plays an important role in the process of obtaining information about VRAM. Sometimes third-party (and even built-in) software makes a mistake in determining video memory. It is almost impossible to exclude such a fact, therefore it is recommended to check the data with the official resources of the manufacturer.

      Go to nvidia.com if your PC has NVIDIA graphics, or amd.com for AMD graphics cards. Each resource has a search box where you can enter the name of the GPU. Further, the site will offer to get acquainted with information about the graphics chip or compare it with other types of equipment.

      Raw clock speeds and compute cores are not the only factors to consider when choosing a graphics card. Equally important is that your GPU has access to enough VRAM (video memory) for your workloads.

      By being in the optimal location, you can get the best performance out of your workloads without spending too much on video memory you might not need.

      What’s more, as the demand for video memory for your professional projects and modern video games will continue to grow in the coming years, you can save yourself the trouble of upgrading your GPU in the near future, by selecting a graphics card with sufficient video memory .

      As is often the case, video memory requirements depend on what you plan to use your graphics card for.

      When building a PC for tasks such as video editing, your graphics card’s video memory requirements may vary depending on the software you are using, as well as the complexity of your project, so you need to determine the best amount of video memory for your specific workloads .

      To help you make your decision, in this guide we’ll look at the video memory requirements for popular creative workloads.

      Since VRAM also has a significant impact on gaming performance, we will give a general overview of what gamers should pay attention to.

      How Much VRAM Do You Need — An Overview

      For those of you just looking for quick numbers, here’s our summary table of VRAM capacity requirements for a variety of popular workloads.

      Be sure to continue reading for details on how we arrived at these numbers.

      Load Recommended video memory
      Minimum Middle Optimal
      3D modeling, animation and CPU/GPU rendering Modeling and animation (active workloads) 6-8 GB GDDR6 8-10 GB GDDR6/6X 10+ GB GDDR6/6X
      Rendering on CPU (passive workloads) 6-8 GB GDDR6/6X 6-8 GB GDDR6/6X 6-8 GB GDDR6/6X
      GPU rendering (passive workloads) 6-8 GB GDDR6/6X 8-16 GB GDDR6/6X 24+ GB GDDR6/6X/HBM2
      Video editing, motion design, compositing General video editing 4-6 GB GDDR6/5X/5 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5
      GPU intensive video editing such as Davinci Resolve 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5 8-16 GB GDDR6 16-24 GB GDDR6/6X
      Motion design and composting 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5 8-10 GB GDDR6 10-24 GB GDDR6/6X
      Graphic design 4-6 GB GDDR6/5X/5 4-6 GB GDDR6/5X/5 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5
      Games 1080p 4-6 GB GDDR6/5X/5 4-6 GB GDDR6/5X/5 4-6 GB GDDR6
      1440p 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5 6-8 GB GDDR6/5X/5 6-8 GB GDDR6
      4K 6-8 GB GDDR6 8-10 GB GDDR6/6X 10+ GB GDDR6/6X

      What is VRAM

      The abbreviation VRAM stands for Video Random Access Memory and serves as fast temporary storage for the GPU on your graphics card.

      Before the GPU can render a single frame or a particular scene, the VRAM stores pre-made textures, models, geometry, and lightmaps that the GPU then uses to render that particular frame.

      After rendering is complete, the video card stores the result in VRAM as framebuffer , which is then sent to the video display to display the final image on your monitor.

      When we talk about rendering, it simply means the processing (mathematics) of the graphics calculations that together produce the visual end result. So the GPU is just doing a bunch of calculations on the data stored in the VRAM.

      Simplified example: to render (create) a visual image in a computer game or 3D rendering software, which can then be displayed on a monitor, the following happens:

      1. Scene data (textures, polygons, animation, lighting, etc.) is being loaded from your Mass Storage into your GPU’s VRAM.
      2. GPU transmits rays through each pixel
      3. When a ray hits a surface, the GPU looks for which polygons, lights, and textures are associated with that pixel. This data resides in VRAM.
      4. When the GPU has finished checking all the pixels for this frame, the frame will be completed and can be stored back into VRAM again.
      5. Finished frame is displayed on the monitor (or saved to disk)

      RAM vs Video Memory — What’s the Difference

      System Memory or RAM is extremely fast temporary storage in your computer that allows the processor (CPU) to quickly access the data it needs to process your workloads. System RAM can be easily upgraded or replaced with other modules.

      VRAM is fast RAM that the graphics card’s processor uses exclusively for tasks such as rendering scenes and driving displays.

      Video memory is soldered directly to the graphics card, and this proximity to the GPU means that it can access information from it much faster than from system RAM or attached storage devices.

      Because the video memory is soldered to the GPU circuit board, it cannot be upgraded or replaced with other modules.

      So why does VRAM need to be soldered to the GPU? Can’t we just create a GPU video memory socket where we can swap RAM modules like we do with system RAM on the motherboard?

      The reason this is not possible is because VRAM is much faster than system RAM and the GPU core does not have the same level of caches (L1, L2, L3) as the CPU. Taken together, this means that the GPU must be able to access the video memory as quickly as possible, and for signal integrity reasons, the video memory must be soldered to the GPU.

      Video memory types

      Most graphics cards today use two types of VRAM: GDDR or HBM .

      Both GDDR and HBM have gone through several changes over the years, and each new generation brings improvements in areas such as scaled-down node processing technology, memory bandwidth, transistor count, allowing manufacturers to add faster and more compute cores to graphic cards.

      Smaller nodes mean you can add more transistors to VRAM while maintaining its size. This means higher video memory capacity for the same size and lower power consumption.

      GDDR Video Memory

      GDDR or Graphics Double Data Rate has long been the VRAM of choice for the graphics card industry due to its similarity to DDR system memory, making it easier and cheaper to manufacture.

      With six major and two minor changes, GDDR has greatly improved the transfer rate (the amount of data that can be sent or received per second) since the fifth generation, with the transfer rate of GDDR6 doubled compared to GDDR5 .

      HBM Video Memory

      HBM or High Bandwidth Memory is a type of VRAM that uses stacked memory chips to achieve a smaller form factor than comparable GDDR memory. The

      HBM is also more power efficient thanks to its wide memory bus which helps it transfer data at lower clock speeds.

      However, because HBM memory modules are more expensive to manufacture, this memory is rarely used in consumer GPUs, and the AMD Vega series is the only consumer graphics card that uses it.

      Understanding the Memory Bus and Bandwidth

      Although sufficient video memory is critical, the performance of your graphics card will be highly dependent on the memory bandwidth of the GPU . Memory bandwidth depends on the type of memory used, the width of the memory bus, the memory clock rate, and the number of cycles per clock.

      To make it easier to understand, you can imagine a line at the cashier. Checkpoint 9The 0007 memory capacity of the GPU is similar to the number of people who get their tickets in a fixed unit of time, say a minute.

      The width of the memory bus here represents the total number of available ticket counters, so the larger the better, while the memory frequency can be considered as the time spent by the cashier to print one ticket, which in our case remains fixed.

      Video memory is usually divided into several modules in a video card, each with the same capacity. Each memory module will have a fixed amount of bandwidth for the GPU.

      Bandwidth is a track on the printed circuit board of a video card, each of which is capable of transmitting data in both directions simultaneously.

      So, if we take an RTX 3080 with a 320-bit bus, then out of 10 GB of GDDR6X video memory, each 1 GB module will have 32 lines to the GPU.

      Comparing this to a 192-bit RTX 3060 bus with 12GB of GDDR6 memory, we can see that only 16 lanes are allocated to each 1GB module, which serves as a reminder that more video memory may not always be better .

      Memory bus width is the total number of lines from the processor to all memory modules over which the memory can transfer data. Higher performance graphics cards typically use a wider bus to achieve higher memory bandwidth.

      The memory clock speed is another important factor when calculating memory bandwidth. Having a higher memory clock increases bandwidth and can compensate for the smaller memory bus in graphics cards.

      Simplified math would be something like this: memory bandwidth = memory bus width × memory clock speed

      Bandwidth will limit the amount of memory your graphics card will use under heavy loads.

      Keep in mind that higher memory bandwidth may not always guarantee better performance, because you also need to take into account the processing power of the GPU to process data from video memory.

      What actually uses/fills VRAM

      The framebuffer that is used for the monitor takes up a small amount of graphics card memory, and a 4K HDR image takes up about 50MB of video memory.

      This low consumption is the reason why graphics cards whose sole purpose is to drive displays do not require large amounts of video memory (workloads such as word processing or simple browsing).

      However, when the graphics card needs to render frames for visually demanding tasks, it needs multiple data buffers that will cover the scene’s texture, lighting, shadows, geometry, and more, which will quickly fill up the available GPU video memory.

      Add to that features like ray tracing, anti-aliasing, complex texture maps, and you’ll need a significant amount of video memory. Running at higher resolutions will also increase video memory requirements.

      To sum up : everything that the GPU needs to process is placed in the video memory.

      Depending on your workloads, this could be:

      • Data buffers, frame buffers
      • Textures, video (image sequences)
      • Polygons, meshes, geometry
      • Lighting, light caches
      • Beam trees
      • Depth Maps, UV Maps
      • Databases

      Does increasing the amount of VRAM improve performance

      Will increasing the VRAM of the video card allow scenes to be rendered faster? The short answer is yes, but only if you had too little before.

      Your video card uses VRAM in the same way that your processor uses system memory.

      When your PC runs out of system memory, extra data is written to the swap file that resides on your SSD or HDD, which is much slower than system memory, causing your system to become sluggish and prone to frequent crashes.

      Same with VRAM, with the difference that the data is swapped out to the system memory. Due to the remoteness of the system RAM from the GPU, and the many connections and smaller buses it has to go through in order to do so, access to the GPU is much slower and this often results in instability and slowdowns.

      In these scenarios, increasing the VRAM can result in a significant performance improvement , as the data can now reside entirely in the graphics card’s memory, making it easier for the GPU to access.

      Of course, you can increase the amount of video memory only by purchasing a new GPU (or linking via NVLINK — more on that later).

      While VRAM capacity is important, choosing a graphics card based solely on VRAM capacity can limit your performance in other ways, as many lower-end graphics cards, such as the 12GB marketing Nvidia RTX 3060, make the RTX 3060 more attractive, than higher-end GPUs with less video memory (which would be a mistake).

      Your best bet is to determine the and video memory performance requirements for your workloads and choose a graphics card that fits your budget.

      Workload VRAM Usage

      Enough talk. Let’s take a closer look at some popular workloads and their video memory requirements.

      As mentioned earlier, choosing too much video memory may not provide a real performance benefit, and not enough can lead to crashes and slow performance.

      We’ve grouped similar workloads into popular categories and looked at their VRAM requirements:

      3D modeling, animation, and CPU/GPU rendering

      Getting the most out of your GPU in 3D workloads today depends on whether whether your scene data needed to render a frame can easily fit into your GPU’s video memory.

      If you run out of memory, you will have to rely on system RAM, which is slower for graphics tasks.

      We have categorized usage according to active and passive 3D workloads:

      Active workloads

      For those building a PC for 3D modeling or animation, the video card plays a vital role in determining the frame rate of the viewport and smoothness your work.

      The ideal viewport frame rate should be around 30-60 fps for smooth interaction with the model without lag.

      Since you will be rendering frames in real time, it is very important to make sure that your graphics card has enough video memory.

      Depending on the complexity of your scene, polygon count, texture rendering resolution, and viewport effects, we recommend starting with a 6 GB or more graphics card such as the GTX 1660 Super, which is the best choice for price and performance.

      If you plan to enable powerful viewport rendering features in Blender Eevee or Maya Viewport 2.0, added shader effects, SSAO, Depth of Field, Bloom, or real-time reflections, you will need a video card with at least 8 GB of memory, especially if the scene is complex.

      If this is your case, consider buying at least an RTX 2060 Super or RTX 3060 Ti so you can continue to work with the adaptive viewport.

      Running at higher resolutions will also result in higher video memory consumption, at which point most low end 8GB cards will start to hit their limits.

      Be aware that, like games, viewport load is shared between the CPU and GPU at lower resolutions, making the CPU the main bottleneck.

      So CPU upgrade can give you a much better improvement over increasing video memory, especially if your scene already fits well in video memory.

      Summary : VRAM requirements for active 3D workloads such as modeling, animation, rigging, texturing:

      • Baseline : GPU with 6-8GB VRAM (e.g. GTX 1660 Super)
      • Medium scenes : GPU with 8-10 GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 3060 Ti, RTX 3070)
      • Extremely complex scenes : GPU with 10+ GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 2080Ti, RTX 3080)
      Passive/rendering workloads

      Standalone Final-Render engines differ in video memory consumption from active workloads. We have separated passive rendering into CPU and GPU based rendering as both have their own set of hardware requirements.

      Processor Rendering :

      Because CPU rendering uses processor cores, almost no video card is required, let alone a card with a lot of video memory, to ensure fast and smooth rendering performance.

      By focusing your budget on purchasing a CPU with as many cores as possible, you’ll get the best performance in applications that use CPU-based 3D rendering engines such as V-Ray, Corona, or the Cinema 4D physical renderer.

      Graphics Rendering :

      While rendering with the GPU is highly dependent on your graphics card’s processing power and processing capabilities, to get the best GPU performance you need to make sure your project fits in video memory.

      Most GPU render engines such as Redshift, Octane and V-Ray show significant improvements in render times with more VRAM, especially in scenes that use high polygon counts, high resolution textures and complex lighting (GI, Light Cache). , Brute Force).

      For simple scenes with low-poly models and low resolution textures, a GPU with 6 GB or even just 4 GB of VRAM may be sufficient.

      If you are planning to render a complex scene with high-resolution textures and many high-poly objects and cloners, we recommend purchasing a GPU with at least 8 GB of video memory so that the scene fits adequately in the memory of the video card and does not want to be unloaded «outside the core» into RAM system, which significantly slows down the work.

      Dealing with higher resolution outputs (e.g. print-sized render resolution) will almost always require you to have a card with a significant amount of video memory, since rendering complexity increases with the number of pixels even for moderately complex scenes.

      For the most complex projects, you will need a significant amount of video memory. The RTX 3090 from Nvidia is a good choice, equipped with 24GB of VRAM.

      You can also opt for a Quadro card like the Ampere RTX A6000 for more video memory capacity, although you will spend a significant amount of money only to increase the video memory, not the processing capability.

      Render engines such as Chaos Group’s V-Ray that support Nvidia’s NVLink feature can implement VRAM pooling from multiple graphics cards.

      NVLink allows you to display very complex scenes without having to buy one expensive GPU with more video memory, especially with Nvidia RTX 20-series cards with wider support for this feature.

      Some rendering engines, such as Redshift , use out-of-core rendering to get around potentially low video memory capacity. In Redshift, when a video card runs out of memory, the rendering engine allocates system memory instead.

      Although this results in performance degradation, some scene data, such as textures, will behave the same way when loaded from system RAM or from GPU video memory. However, the supported data types are limited, and a large increase in VRAM can lead to crashes.

      Engines like Octane that don’t support this feature will crash due to lack of video memory, so depending on the software you choose, it may be better to invest in a GPU powerful enough to prevent any slowdowns.

      Summary : VRAM requirements for passive 3D workloads such as GPU rendering:

      • Baseline : 6-8GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 2060 Super)
      • Medium scenes : GPU with 8-16 GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 3060 Ti, RTX 3080)
      • Very complex scenes : GPU with 24+ GB VRAM (e. g. RTX 3090, A6000) or multiple GPUs

      Video editing, motion design, and compositing

      When building a computer for video editing workloads, the amount of video memory required is highly dependent on the type of software being used.

      Video editing applications such as Premiere Pro do not take advantage of GPU acceleration to the point where more video memory can significantly improve performance.

      Instead, choosing a graphics card with higher processing performance will give better results.

      We recommend purchasing up to 8 GB VRAM for Premiere Pro, and even a budget consumer GPU should be adequate for this workload.

      Summary : Video memory requirements for video editing applications such as Premiere Pro

      • GPU with 4-8 GB of VRAM (ex. GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060 Super, RTX 3070)

      For those interested in building a PC workstation for video editing software such as DaVinci Resolve or Fusion , which makes heavy use of your graphics card to work, having the right amount of video memory can greatly improve overall rendering and playback performance .

      It is also possible to work with multiple GPUs, which can further reduce rendering time.

      We recommend a graphics card with at least 6-8 GB of VRAM and enough processing power to edit content at 1080p or 2160p in the Full HD timeline.

      If you plan to work with 4K or higher resolution footage and need to work with 4K high resolution timeline, we recommend purchasing a graphics card with at least 8 GB of VRAM.

      Because DaVinci Resolve makes great use of additional video memory, using a graphics card with more memory will give you the flexibility to work with higher resolution frames and timelines in the future.

      Summary : Video memory requirements for GPU dependent video editing applications

      • 1080p/2160p video recording with FHD timeline 3070)
      • 4K video recording with QHD timeline : GPU with 8-11 GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 2080Ti, RTX 3080)
      • 4K+ video recording with 4K timeline : One or more GPUs with 16-24 GB VRAM (e. g. RTX 3090, Quadro RTX 6000)

      While system requirements for motion design and layout software such as After Effects are highly CPU and system memory dependent, they use graphics acceleration for certain features such as GPU accelerated effects .

      We recommend aiming for 8 GB VRAM unless you plan to work at higher resolutions and bit depths, or use After Effects in combination with 3D rendering plugins like Cineware or third-party GPU-accelerated plugins like NeatVideo DeNoise, which are more dependent on the performance of the video card and the amount of video memory.

      Summary : Video Memory Requirements for Motion Design and Composting Workloads

      • Baseline : GPU with 6-8 GB VRAM (e.g. GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060 Super)
      • Moderate 3D rendering and GPU accelerated plugins : 8-11 GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 3060, RTX 3070)
      • Heavy 3D rendering and GPU accelerated plugins : 11-24GB VRAM (e. g. RTX 2080Ti, RTX 3090)

      Graphic design

      Graphic design software such as Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign and Affinity Designer see only marginal performance benefits when using a more powerful GPU. Even a budget GPU with 4 GB of VRAM can be enough for most graphic design tasks.

      Scaling up to more than 8 GB will not impact performance, and even most premium GPUs will not perform better than a regular 8 GB graphics card, even when running at higher resolutions.

      Summary : VRAM requirements for graphic design

      • Baseline : GPU with 4-6 GB VRAM (e.g. GTX 1660)
      • Moderately complex artboards : GPU with 4-6 GB VRAM (e.g. GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060)
      • Very complex artboards : GPU with 6-8 GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 2060 Super)

      Game applications

      VRAM usage for game loads depends on several different factors such as resolution, graphics quality, or games being played.

      Most modern games allow you to customize the quality of the graphics you want to play. The settings typically range from low to ultra (and some manual finer settings), with each higher preset incrementally increasing the complexity of shadows, post-effects, object detail, and many other visual aspects of the game.

      Selecting a higher preset will require more video memory to store extensive texture data and model details in memory.

      Of course, each game has its own requirements for video memory, and here we can only give a general overview.

      Open world games such as Shadow of Mordor will consume significantly more VRAM at Ultra settings due to more details that need to be loaded.

      In other modern games, video memory requirements may not increase at all when changing quality settings.

      Many game developers optimize their games to run on GPUs with less VRAM, so check the official system requirements for your game.

      Before choosing a graphics card, you need to prioritize what you need for your gaming experience. Usually using higher resolutions will force you to play at lower quality unless you are willing to invest in a high quality graphics card.

      Reducing the amount of video memory available on your video card will result in freezes and crashes, while excess video memory will not make a real difference in performance similar to system RAM.

      Another factor that people tend to forget is VRAM allocation versus actual usage. For example, Microsoft Flight Simulator allocates/reserves the full 11 GB of VRAM available on the RTX 2080Ti, even though it may currently be using less.

      It goes without saying that the processing power of your GPU and CPU should also be taken into account, as this will affect your gaming performance even more than enough video memory.

      We recommend using a GPU with at least 6 GB of graphics memory if you plan to play games at 1080p resolution, high quality, and reasonable frame rates.

      Most graphics cards with this amount of video memory will run most modern games, even those requiring more than 60 frames per second at high quality.

      For 1080p and 1440p high refresh rate gaming, we recommend purchasing the current or latest GPU with at least 8 GB of VRAM. You can run games normally with 6 GB of VRAM, but memory consumption increases with each new game, so it’s better to get something more powerful from the very beginning to stay in the game in the future.

      For 4K gaming , more than 10 GB of VRAM is a wise choice. Using this configuration will allow you to play at high or ultra presets in 4K in most games that will be launched in the near future.

      Memory bandwidth and processing power also play a vital role here, so graphics cards like the RTX 3080 with 10GB GDDR6X VRAM outperform the previous generation RTX 2080Ti with 11GB GDDR6 VRAM by nearly 50% at 1440p and 70% at 4K resolution.

      Summary : VRAM requirements for games

      • 1080p: GPU with 4-6 GB VRAM (e.g. RTX 2060, GTX 1660 Super)
      • 1440p: GPU with 6-8 GB VRAM (e. g. RX 5700XT, RTX 3060 Ti)
      • 4K: GPU with 6-10 GB VRAM (e.g. RX 6800XT, RTX 3080)

      Multi-GPU video memory usage

      Running multiple GPUs can help significantly speed up some specific 3D rendering and video editing workloads. However, Available video memory does not stack with added GPUs .

      Graphics cards and PCIe slots available today are not advanced enough to allow a GPU to access someone else’s memory in real time without significant latency .

      A typical multi-GPU setup works by loading identical copies of the workload into the video memory of each of the GPUs available on the system. Then each graphics card processes the data, and it is in this parallel computing that the actual performance lies.

      The memory stack works by directly connecting your GPUs through the NVLINK bridge . Although Nvidia bundles its potential NVLink memory pool feature with premium GeForce and Quadro cards, it must be supported by your workload software in order to use the pooled memory of multiple GPUs.

      We still recommend purchasing higher capacity graphics cards for better compatibility, even in multi-GPU configurations.


      Video Memory FAQ

      Is more video memory better for rendering?

      Rendering performance is scaled from available VRAM to a certain point where all 3D scene data can easily fit into VRAM and does not need to be swapped out to system memory.

      After that, the extra video memory will have little effect on performance, and the extra performance you get will solely depend on the increase in the processing cores on the GPU and some potential software-level optimizations that use free video memory, such as caches and ray trees.

      What happens if VRAM runs out?

      When the graphics card runs out of video memory, data meant to be loaded into graphics memory is swapped out to system memory (RAM) — if the software/game supports it. This almost always results in performance degradation, freezes or even crashes.

      Is it possible to increase VRAM without replacing the video card?

      Unfortunately, unlike traditional RAM, the video memory cannot be upgraded because it is soldered directly to the GPU circuit board.

      2022 © All rights reserved