Gtx 1080 wattage requirement: How Much Power Does the GTX 1080 Need?

How Much Power Does the GTX 1080 Need?

It is a very common rookie mistake to ignore the importance of the power supply unit (PSU) when building or buying a computer. They are almost always preoccupied with the CPU or GPU, completely ignoring the PSU.

These consumers sometimes end up having a complete system with insufficient power, and as a result, they encounter system failures, or worse, burning their shiny new components because of a cheap power supply.

As all experienced PC gamers would advise, “Never cheap out on the PSU”.

For a power-hungry GPUs such as the GTX 1080, choosing the right power supply is just as important as choosing the CPU or motherboard.

It may not be as shiny as your RGB components and peripherals, but your power supply plays an important role in the overall performance of your computer, as it is the one bringing the juice to all the components in order for them to work.

In this article, we will discuss the power consumption of this popular GPU and its ideal power supply requirements in different cases.

Contents

  • So How Much Power Does a GTX 1080 Use?
  • Is 450 Watts Enough for the GTX 1080?
  • Is 500W Enough Power for this GPU?
  • Can a 550W PSU Run a GTX 1080?
  • What About Using a 600W PSU?
  • Is 650W a Good Idea to Run a GTX 1080 or is it Overkill?
  • The Bottom Line: What Wattage PSU Would you Recommend?
  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    • What Should I be Looking for When Choosing a PSU for this GPU?
    • What is the Difference Between GTX 1080 and GTX 1080 Ti?
    • Is the GTX 1080 Still Good Today?

So How Much Power Does a GTX 1080 Use?

As per Nvidia’s official website, a GTX 1080 has a power consumption of 180W and has a recommended system power of 500W. It also uses one or two 8-pins or 6+2 pins PCIe connectors depending on the GPU brand.

Although this may still vary as there are different variants of GTX 1080 available in the market today. Some variants of GTX 1080 may require more PCIe connectors or power because of some additional features such as being factory overclocked.

Is 450 Watts Enough for the GTX 1080?

Yes and No. While a gaming PC with a GTX 1080 might work with only 450W, it is not ideal to run your PC with very low system power and we definitely won’t recommend this for a GTX 1080 setup.

Although 450W should be enough to power the 1080, remember that this GPU alone consumes up to 180W, not to mention the power consumption of your other hardware such as the CPU, drives, memory, and so on.

In addition to that, always keep in mind that the recommended system power of running a GTX 1080 is at least 500W, so it is best to keep your system power within that range, or better yet, more than what is required for headroom for future upgrades.

Anyway, for the sake of this discussion, we’ve tried analyzing the power consumption of a desktop PC using the Seasonic wattage calculator.

This setup is composed of very basic components and peripherals along with GTX 1080 to determine whether a 450W PSU is enough for GTX 1080.

Main Specs Used:

CPU Memory GPU Storage Fans Peripherals
Intel Core i5 10400 2 x 8GB DDR4 GTX 1080 1 x SSD + 1 x 7200RPM HDD 6 x 120mm fans (2 front, 2 top, 1 rear, plus 1 for the CPU heatsink) Gaming Keyboard and Gaming Mouse

Power Consumption Results:

Load Wattage Recommended PSU Wattage
404W 454W

After running the wattage calculator, we’ve found out that the total power consumption of this particular setup at full load is only 404W, enough for a 450W PSU… or is it?

Since power supplies are not at all times efficient, we cannot be sure that a 450W power supply can always deliver at 100%, that is why it is highly recommended to go beyond the recommended system power.

Is 500W Enough Power for this GPU?

Based on the official Nvidia’s website, 500W is the recommended system power for a GTX 1080 which means it should be enough to power up your system.

But we have not taken into the account the other components and peripherals that you may have such as a CPU, multiple drives, RGB strips and fans, multiple RAM sticks, and so on.

So using the same wattage calculator, let us tweak the components from the previous one and determine if 500W is ideal for the GTX 1080.

Main Specs Used:

CPU Memory GPU Storage Fans Peripherals
Intel Core i5 10400 2 x 8 GB DDR4 GTX 1080 1 x SSD + 2 x 7200RPM HDD 6 x 120mm fans (2 front, 2 top, 1 rear, plus 1 for the CPU heatsink) Gaming Keyboard and Gaming Mouse

Power Consumption Results:

Load Wattage Recommended PSU Wattage
415W 465W

Based on the output above, a 500W PSU should be enough for the GTX along with basic components.

If you are planning to use a 500W PSU for the GTX 1080, just always keep in mind your future upgrades, as this may affect the total load wattage of your entire system and the 500W is no longer enough.

Can a 550W PSU Run a GTX 1080?

Definitely. A 550W PSU is more than enough to run a GTX 1080. Not only is this PSU enough, but you also have headroom for future upgrades.

With a 550W power supply, you can also use a better CPU along with the GPU, as well as additional accessories and peripherals.

Below is an example of a more power-hungry system alongside the GTX 1080, let’s see how a 550W power supply would perform under this type of setup.

Main Specs Used:

CPU Memory GPU Storage Liquid Cooler Fans Peripherals Other Accessories
Intel Core i7 10700K 2 x 8GB DDR4 GTX 1080 1 x M.2 SSD + 1 x SSD + 2 x 7200RPM HDD Cooler Master MasterLiquid Pro 120 6 x 120mm fans (3 front, 3 top) Gaming Keyboard and Gaming Mouse LED strips and Fan Controller Device

Power Consumption Results:

Load Wattage 486W
Recommended PSU Wattage 536W

As you can see from our example above, a 550W PSU should be enough to run a GTX 1080.

Also, we’ve added an additional M.2 SSD, an AIO cooler, LED strips, and a fan controller device. The load wattage for this kind of setup is only at 486W with a recommended PSU wattage of 536W.

What About Using a 600W PSU?

Since a 550W PSU is enough for the GTX 1080, there’s really no reason why a 600W PSU will not work.

600W should be more than enough to power up an entire system that contains a GTX 1080. So this time, let’s take a different approach to how we calculate the capabilities of a 600W PSU in terms of delivering power to a GTX 1080 gaming setup.

Main Specs Used:

CPU Memory GPU Storage Liquid Cooler Fans Peripherals Other Accessories
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X OC’ed to 4.30GHz @ 1.33v (please take note that these settings are for a test setup and may not work with other setups) 4 x 8GB GTX 1080 1 x M. 2 SSD + 1 x SSD + 2 x 7200RPM HDD NZXT Kraken X72 4 x 120mm fans (3 front, 1 rear) Gaming Keyboard and Gaming Mouse LED strips and Fan Controller Device

Power Consumption Results:

Load Wattage Recommended PSU Wattage
491W 541W

Note that we changed the CPU to an overclocked Ryzen 7 3700X and NZXT Kraken X72 360mm AIO.

As you can see, there’s still lots of headroom for 600W as the total wattage is only at 491W and recommended PSU wattage at 541W, even for an overclocked Ryzen 7 3700x.

So if you have a 600W PSU right now and are planning to buy a GTX 1080, you have nothing to worry about.

Is 650W a Good Idea to Run a GTX 1080 or is it Overkill?

Since it is obvious enough that a 650W PSU can run a GTX 1080 with ease, let’s take another approach on testing it.

This time, let’s see if a 650W PSU is capable of running a 2 x GTX 1080 at SLI configuration.

Main Specs Used:

CPU Memory GPU Storage Fans Peripherals
Intel Core i7 10700 4 x 8GB DDR4 2 x GTX 1080 SLI 1 x M.2 SSD + 1 x 7200RPM HDD 8 x 120mm fans (3 front; 3 top; 1 rear; 1 for CPU heatsink) Gaming Keyboard and Gaming Mouse

Power Consumption Results:

Load Wattage Recommended PSU Wattage
594W 644W

In this kind of setup, we changed the CPU to Intel Core i7 at stock speed and removed the water cooling and other devices.

The results show us a 594W load wattage with a recommended PSU wattage of 644W.

In theory, a 650W should be enough to run this setup considering the load wattage is only at 594W. But there are other things to consider such as the efficiency of the power supply and the total number of PCIe connectors.

The Bottom Line: What Wattage PSU Would you Recommend?

Based on the sections above, the safest and the most recommended PSU wattage for GTX 1080 is 600W.

Even for the most experienced users, 600W is the sweet spot for a GTX 1080 since there may be some upgrades in the future, that may need some additional system power.

This way, you don’t have to worry now or in the future, whether or not your PSU can handle the overall power requirements of your gaming PC.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What Should I be Looking for When Choosing a PSU for this GPU?

While choosing a specific brand for PSU is broad, there are some guides that you may want to consider in choosing the best PSU for your needs and budget.

The first one is the 80+ certification. Ideally, you would want to get a PSU with at least a 80+ Bronze certification.

We have written reviews on the best PSUs for the GTX 1080 currently which may be of some help to you.

What is the Difference Between GTX 1080 and GTX 1080 Ti?

Many people are confused about NVidia’s line of graphics cards, specifically to their Ti and non-Ti cards, particularly, the GTX 1080 and GTX 1080 Ti. So what exactly are the differences between both cards?

Both cards are under the same GPU Pascal architecture and have the same standard memory configuration of GDDR5X, there are a lot of differences between the two cards in terms of performance.

Below are the specs of both cards.

  GTX 1080 GTX 1080 Ti
GPU Architecture Pascal Pascal
Frame Buffer 8 GB GDDR5X 11 GB GDDR5X
Memory Speed 10 Gbps 11 Gbps
Boost Clock 1733 MHz 1582 MHz
Cuda Cores 2560 3584
Memory Interface Width 256-bit 352-bit
Memory Bandwidth 320 GB/sec 484 GB/sec

As you can see from the quick specs table above, the GTX 1080 Ti has a clear advantage except for boost clock.

But it shouldn’t affect the overall performance that much since there are still other factors that affect the GPU’s raw power, such as the Cuda cores, memory bandwidth, and VRAM.

With that being said, Nvidia’s Ti cards are faster than the non-Ti version, and are usually more expensive.

Is the GTX 1080 Still Good Today?

The answer to this is yes the GTX 1080 is still good today. It is still after all of these years able to handle 1080p at an impressive 80 FPS even for the most demanding triple-A games at high settings. Here

James Cosgrove

James Cosgrove has been the lead writer at GizmoFusion since 2019. He has a huge passion for the latest technology and gadgets. He loves to talk and write about this interest. He hopes that visitors to the website will find his reports informative and helpful when it comes to making the best choices for their needs.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Power Consumption Results

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Power Consumption Results

Test Setup

If you’d like to read more about our power testing setup, check out The Math Behind GPU Power Consumption And PSUs. We’re also adding two more measurement series’ with 500ns and 10ms time intervals to meet any challenges GPU Boost 3.0 might throw at us. Also, our current clamps were recalibrated for accuracy and speed.

Our test equipment hasn’t changed, though.

Power Consumption
Test Method Contact-free DC Measurement at PCIe Slot (Using a Riser Card) Contact-free DC Measurement at External Auxiliary Power Supply Cable Direct Voltage Measurement at Power Supply Real-Time Infrared Monitoring and Recording
Test Equipment 2 x Rohde & Schwarz HMO 3054, 500MHz Digital Multi-Channel Oscilloscope with Storage Function 4 x Rohde & Schwarz HZO50 Current Probe (1mA — 30A, 100kHz, DC) 4 x Rohde & Schwarz HZ355 (10:1 Probes, 500MHz) 1 x Rohde & Schwarz HMC 8012 Digital Multimeter with Storage Function 1 x Optris PI640 80Hz Infrared Camera + PI Connect

Before we get going, we’d like to note that power consumption measurements at idle always pose a challenge. Even an empty desktop might see sporadic load fluctuations. Consequently, we use a long-term measurement and then choose a representative two-minute sample for our test.

Please note that the minimum and maximum states in the following tables don’t always occur at the same time. This is why the individual numbers for the rails don’t necessarily add up to the total for all of the rails.

Idle Power Consumption

Idle power consumption looks great. Altogether, our measurements indicate 6.8W. Some of this goes toward the fan, the memory and the voltage converters, which means that we’re probably looking at approximately 5W for the GPU alone. That’s a fantastic result.

Image 1 of 6

Minimum Maximum Average
PCIe Total 0W 16W 4W
Motherboard 3. 3V 0W 0W 0W
Motherboard 12V 1W 13W 3W
Graphics Card Total 1W 27W 7W

Gaming Power Consumption

The numbers get more interesting as we measure power consumption while running a loop of Metro: Last Light at Ultra HD. After the graphics card warms up to a toasty 84 degrees Celsius (10 degrees under its thermal threshold), power consumption registers 173W. Prior to the warm-up phase, we were seeing 178W, which is the limit defined in Nvidia’s BIOS. In other words, the company was right on with its 180W TDP rating.

Next we compare the GeForce GTX 1080 to its predecessor, Nvidia’s reference GeForce GTX 980. In the same loop, the older board consumes 180W. Now, Nvidia promises that GPU Boost 3.0 yields improved power delivery with fewer voltage fluctuations. Here’s the direct comparison:

Spikes above 300W are a thing of the past. Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080 barely has any, whereas they were a lot more frequent on the 980. Overall, even though these cards post almost identical averages, the GeForce GTX 1080’s curve is both smoother and more dense.

For those of you who enjoy the gory details, you’ll find them in the following picture gallery:

Image 1 of 7

Minimum Maximum Average
PCIe Total 5W 273W 133W
Motherboard 3.3V 0W 0W 0W
Motherboard 12V 15W 62W 40W
Graphics Card Total 24W 311W 173W

Our analysis shows that only about 40W comes from the motherboard’s slot. Meanwhile, the eight-pin auxiliary power connector supplies 133W of its 150W rated maximum. This means that power consumption through the PCIe cable won’t be an issue. After all, we never saw any problems from Nvidia’s Quadro M6000 when that cable had to supply 170W.

Gaming Power Consumption With Overclocking

Now let’s switch to gaming under the highest overclock we could achieve with our GeForce GTX 1080 sample. Getting there required setting the power target to its 120% maximum and increasing the base clock to facilitate a 2.1GHz GPU Boost frequency.

It comes as no surprise that consumption rises 19% from 173W to 206. That’s not particularly good news for enthusiasts concerned about their eight-pin power connectors, but it’s still a fairly realistic goal that shouldn’t cause any damage to your hardware.

Image 1 of 6

Minimum Maximum Average
PCIe Total 25W 342W 158W
Motherboard 3. 3V 0W 0W 0W
Motherboard 12V 20W 72W 48W
Graphics Card Total 35W 392W 206W

A more detailed efficiency comparison should boards from Nvidia’s partners with better-performing coolers. So, at this point, we’re limiting ourselves to a brief overview.

Currently, the scaling of clock rate, power consumption and gaming performance at different loads looks like this:

FPS (Original) Power (Original) FPS (OC) Power (OC) Increase in FPS Increase in Power
Metro Last Light @ UHD: 54.1 173W 58.8 206W +8. 6% +19.1%
Metro Last Light @ FHD: 145.0 166W 154.3 191W +6.4% +15.1%
Thief @ UHD: 59.2 170W 64.8 200W +9.5% +17.7%
Thief @ FHD: 109.9 146W 116.2 164W +5.7% +12.3%

Stress Test Power Consumption

Let’s explore what happens when the GPU really heats up, forcing the card to enforce its power target.

Our 176W result lands just under Nvidia’s power limit. The card does have to pull its clock rates by quite a bit to keep power consumption at this level during a stress test, though. This is equally due to the temperature limit and the PWM controller’s power limit.

Image 1 of 6

Minimum Maximum Average
PCIe Total 10W 172W 128W
Motherboard 3. 3V 0W 1W 0W
Motherboard 12V 21W 64W 48W
Graphics Card Total 31W 224W 176W

The 180W boundary is never crossed without overclocking. In fact, exceeding it would be impossible according to the engineers we asked. We repeatedly double-checked our results using different intervals, and the only measurement that gave us somewhat higher readings was 10ms interval (likely due to the measurement being less accurate).

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GTX 1080 Power Consumption | Green [email protected]

Intro

It’s hard to believe that the Nvidia GTX 1080 is almost three years old now, and I’m just getting around to writing a [email protected] review of it. In the realm of graphics cards, this thing is legendary, and only recently displaced from the enthusiast podium by Nvidia’s new RTX series of cards. The 1080 was Nvidia’s top of the line gaming graphics card (next to the Ti edition of course), and has been very popular for both GPU coin mining and cancer-curing (or at least disease research for Stanford University’s charitable distributed computing project: [email protected]). If you’ve been following along, you know it’s that second thing that I’m interested in. The point of this review is to see just how well the GTX 1080 folds…and by well, I mean not just raw performance, but also energy efficiency.


Quick Stats Comparison

I threw together a quick table to give you an idea of where the GTX 1080 stacks up (I left the newer RTX cards and the older GTX 9-series cards off of here because I’m lazy…

Nvidia Pascal Family GPU Comparison

As you can see, the GTX 1080 is pretty fast, eclipsed only by the GTX 1080 Ti (which also has a higher Thermal Design Power, suggesting more electricity usage). From my previous articles, we’ve seen that the more powerful cards tend to do work more efficiency, especially if they are in the same TDP bracket. So, the 1080 should be a better folder (both in PPD and PPD/Watt efficiency) than the 1070 Ti I tested last time.

Test Card: ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Turbo

As with the 1070 Ti, I picked up a pretty boring flavor of a 1080 in the form of an Asus turbo card. These cards lack back plates (which help with circuit board rigidity and heat dissipation) and use cheap blower coolers, which suck in air from a single centrifugal fan on the underside and blow it out the back of the case (keeping the hot air from building up in the case). These are loud, and tend to run hotter than open-fan coolers, so overclocking and boost clocks are limited compared to aftermarket designs. However, like Nvidia’s own Founder’s Edition reference cards, this reference design provides a good baseline for a 1080’s minimum performance.

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Turbo

The new 1080 looks strikingly similar to the 1070 Ti…Asus is obviously reusing the exact same cooler since both cards have a 180 Watt TDP.

Asus GTX 1080 and 1070 Ti (which one is which?)

Test Environment

Like most of my previous graphics card testing, I put this into my AMD FX-Based Test System. If you are interested in how this test machine does with CPU folding, you can read about it here. Testing was done using Stanford’s [email protected] V7 Client (version 7.5.1) in Windows 10. Points Per Day (PPD) production was collected from Stanford’s servers. Power measurements were done with a P3 Kill A Watt Meter (taken at the wall, for a total-system power profile).

Test Setup Specs

  • Case: Raidmax Sagitta
  • CPU: AMD FX-8320e
  • Mainboard : Gigabyte GA-880GMA-USB3
  • GPU: Asus GeForce 1080 Turbo
  • Ram: 16 GB DDR3L (low voltage)
  • Power Supply: Seasonic X-650 80+ Gold
  • Drives: 1x SSD, 2 x 7200 RPM HDDs, Blu-Ray Burner
  • Fans: 1x CPU, 2 x 120 mm intake, 1 x 120 mm exhaust, 1 x 80 mm exhaust
  • OS: Win10 64 bit
  • Video Card Driver Version: 372. 90

Video Card Configuration – Optimize for Performance

In my previous articles, I’ve shown how Nvidia GPUs don’t always automatically boost their clock rates when running [email protected] (as opposed to video games or benchmarks). The same is true of the GTX 1080. It sometimes needs a little encouragement in order to fold at the maximum performance. I overclocked the core by 175 MHz and increased the power limit* by 20% in MSI afterburner using similar settings to the GTX 1070. These values were shown to be stable after 2+ weeks of testing with no dropped work units.

*I also experimented with the power limit at 100% and I saw no change in card power consumption. This makes sense…folding is not using 100% of the GPU. Inspection of the MSI afterburner plots shows that while folding, the card does not hit the power limit at either 100% or 120%. I will have to reduce the power limit to get the card to throttle back (this will happen in part 2 of this article).

As with previous cards, I did not push the memory into its performance zone, but left it at the default P2 (low-power) state clock rate. The general consensus is that memory clock does not significantly affect [email protected], and it is better to leave the power headroom for the core clock, which does improve performance. As an interesting side-note, the memory clock on this thing jumps up to 5000 Mhz (effective) in benchmarks. For example, see the card’s auto-boost settings when running Heaven:

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 – Boost Clocks (auto) in Heaven Benchmark

Testing Overview

For most of my tests, I just let the computer run [email protected] 24/7 for a couple of days and then average the points per day (PPD) results from Stanford’s stats server. Since the GTX 1080 is such a popular card, I decided to let it run a little longer (a few weeks) to get a really good sampling of results, since PPD can vary a lot from work unit to work unit. Before we get into the duration results, let’s do a quick overview of what the [email protected] environment looks like for a typical work unit.

The following is an example screen shot of the display from the client, showing an instantaneous PPD of about 770K, which is very impressive. Here, it is folding on a core 21 work unit (Project 14124).

[email protected] V7 Client – GeForce GTX 1080

MSI Afterburner is a handy way to monitor GPU stats. As you can see, the GPU usage is hovering in the low 80% region (this is typical for GPU folding in Windows. Linux can use a bit more of the GPU for a few percentage points more PPD). This Asus card, with its reference blower cooler, is running a bit warm (just shy of 70 degrees C), but that’s well within spec. I had the power limit at 120%, but the card is nowhere near hitting that…the power limit seems to just peak above 80% here and there.

GTX 1080 stats while folding.

Measuring card power consumption with the driver shows that it’s using about 150 watts, which seems about right when compared to the GPU usage and power % graphs. 100% GPU usage would be ideal (and would result in a power consumption of about 180 watts, which is the 1080’s TDP).

In terms of card-level efficiency, this is 770,000 PPD / 150 Watts = 5133 PPD/Watt.

Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080 – Instantaneous Power Draw @ the Card

Duration Testing

I ran [email protected] for quite a while on the 1080. As you can see from this plot (courtesy of https://folding.extremeoverclocking.com/), the 1080 is mildly beating the 1070 Ti. It should be noted that the stats for the 1070 Ti are a bit low in the left-hand side of the plot, because folding was interrupted a few times for various reasons (gaming). The 1080 results were uninterrupted.

Geforce GTX 1080 Production History

Another thing I noticed was the amount of variation in the results. Normal work unit variation (at least for less powerful cards) is around 10-20 percent. For the GTX 1080, I saw swings of 200K PPD, which is closer to 30%. Check out that one point at 875K PPD!

Average PPD: 730K PPD

I averaged the PPD over two weeks on the GTX 1080 and got 730K PPD. Previous testing on the GTX 1070 Ti (based on continual testing without interruptions) showed an average PPD of 700K. Here is the plot from that article, reproduced for convenience.

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti [email protected] Production Time History

I had expected my GTX 1080 to do a bit better than that. However, it only has about 5% more CUDA cores than the GTX 1070 Ti (2560 vs 2438). The GTX 1080’s faster memory also isn’t an advantage in [email protected] So, a 30K PPD improvement for the 1080, which corresponds to about a 4.3% faster, makes sense.

System Average Power Consumption: 240 Watts @ the Wall

I spot checked the power meter (P3 Kill A Watt) many times over the course of folding. Although it varies with work unit, it seemed to most commonly use around 230 watts. Peek observed wattage was 257, and minimum was around 220. This was more variation than I typically see, but I think it corresponds with the variation in PPD I saw in the performance graph. It was very tempting to just say that 230 watts was the number, but I wasn’t confident that this was accurate. There was just too much variation.

In order to get a better number, I reset the Kill-A-Watt meter (I hadn’t reset it in ages) and let it log the computer’s usage over the weekend. The meter keeps track of the total kilowatt-hours (KWH) of energy consumed, as well as the time period (in hours) of the reading. By dividing the energy by time, we get power. Instead of an instantaneous power (the eyeball method), this is an average power over the weekend, and is thus a compatible number with the average PPD.

The end result of this was 17.39 KWH consumed over 72.5 hours. Thus, the average power consumption of the computer is:

17.39/72.5 (KWH/H) * 1000 (Watts/KW) = about 240 Watts (I round a bit for convenience in reporting, but the Excel sheet that backs up all my plots is exact)

This is a bit more power consumed than the GTX 1070 Ti results, which used an average of 225 watts (admittedly computed by the eyeball method over many days, but there was much less variation so I think it is valid). This increased power consumption of the GTX 1080 vs. the 1070 Ti is also consistent with what people have seen in games. This Legit Reviews article shows an EVGA 1080 using about 30 watts more power than an EVGA 1070 Ti during gaming benchmarks. The power consumption figure is reproduced below:

Modern Graphics Card Power Consumption. Source: Legit Reviews

This is a very interesting result. Even though the 1080 and the 1070 Ti have the same 180 Watt TDP, the 1080 draws more power, both in [email protected] and in gaming.

System Computational Efficiency: 3044 PPD/Watt

For my Asus GeForce GTX 1080, the [email protected] efficiency is:

730,000 PPD / 240 Watts = 3044 PPD/Watt.

This is an excellent score. Surprisingly, it is slightly less than my Asus 1070 Ti, which I found to have an efficiency of 3126 PPD/Watt. In practice these are so close that it just could be attributed to work unit variation. The GeForce 1080 and 1070 Ti are both extremely efficient cards, and are good choices for [email protected]

Comparison plots here:

GeForce GTX 1080 [email protected] PPD Comparison

GeForce GTX 1080 [email protected] Efficiency Comparison

Final Thoughts

The GTX 1080 is a great card. With that said, I’m a bit annoyed that my GTX 1080 didn’t hit 800K PPD like some folks in the forums say theirs do (I bet a lot of those people getting 800K PPD use Linux, as it is a bit better than Windows for folding). Still, this is a good result.

Similarly, I’m annoyed that the GTX 1080 didn’t thoroughly beat my 1070 Ti in terms of efficiency. The results are so close though that it’s effectively the same. This is part one of a multi-part review, where I tuned the card for performance. In the next article, I plan to go after finding a better efficiency point for running this card by experimenting with reducing the power limit. Right now I’m thinking of running the card at 80% power limit for a week, and then at 60% for another week, and reporting the results. So, stay tuned!

Choosing the Best PSU for Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080 GPU

Learn about what to look for when choosing a power supply for Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080 GPU.

In this article, I’ll go over the things you should consider when choosing a power supply for your computer with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card.

Check out my Recommended Power Supplies for GTX 1080 GPUs below.

Best 450–750 Watt PSU

Corsair SF Series 80+ Platinum Fully Modular Power Supply
Check Price on Amazon

Amazon Affiliate Link

How to Choose a Power Supply for the GTX 1080 GPU

The main job of a power supply is to convert the alternating current (AC) from your wall outlet into the direct current (DC) needed by the components inside your computer.

Power Output

An important factor when buying a PSU is the supported wattage.

You can estimate your power needs by using the following chart.

Component Peak Power Usage
GTX 1080 GPU 180 W
Top-Tier CPU (e.g., Intel Core i9 12900K) 241 W
Mid-Tier CPU (e.g., Intel Core i5 12600K) 150 W
Motherboard 80 W
Optical Drive 30 W
3. 5″ Hard Drive 9 W
M.2 or 2.5″ SSD 9 W
140 mm Case/CPU Fan 6 W
120 mm Case/CPU Fan 6 W
80 mm Case/CPU Fan 3 W

By adding up these numbers, you can estimate peak power usage. Check out the top-tier and mid-tier example builds below.

It’s generally a good idea to add a 100–150 W buffer to your expected usage. This buffer will give you some flexibility in case of miscalculations and will allow you to add more drives, fans, or add-in cards in the future.

In most cases, buying a little more wattage than you need is a safer choice for ensuring system stability.

Don’t forget to account for the additional power required for overclocking if you intend to overclock your CPU or GPU. Overclocking could require roughly an extra 50–100 W, depending on how much you overclock these devices.

Check another Nvidia GPU:

GeForce RTX 3090 Ti GeForce RTX 3090 GeForce RTX 3080 Ti GeForce RTX 3080 GeForce RTX 3070 Ti GeForce RTX 3070 GeForce RTX 3060 Ti GeForce RTX 3060 GeForce RTX 3050 TITAN RTX GeForce RTX 2080 Ti GeForce RTX 2080 Super GeForce RTX 2080 GeForce RTX 2070 Super GeForce RTX 2070 GeForce RTX 2060 Super GeForce RTX 2060 GeForce GTX 1660 Ti GeForce GTX 1660 Super GeForce GTX 1650 Super GeForce GTX 1650 TITAN X Pascal TITAN Xp GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GeForce GTX 1080 GeForce GTX 1070 Ti GeForce GTX 1070 GeForce GTX 1060 GeForce GTX 1050 Ti GeForce GTX 1050 GeForce GT 1030 GeForce GTX TITAN X GeForce GTX 980 Ti GeForce GTX 980 GeForce GTX 970 GeForce GTX 960 GeForce GTX 950 GeForce GTX TITAN Z GeForce GTX TITAN Black GeForce GTX TITAN GeForce GTX 780 Ti GeForce GTX 780 GeForce GTX 770 GeForce GTX 760 Ti GeForce GTX 760 GeForce GTX 760 192-bit GeForce GTX 750 Ti GeForce GTX 750

Top-Tier Estimate:

Top-Tier Components Peak Power Consumption
GTX 1080 GPU 180 watts
Top-Tier CPU (e. g., Intel Core i9 12900K) 241 watts
Motherboard 80 watts
4 M.2 or 2.5″ SSDs 36 watts
3 Case Fans (120 mm) 18 watts
2 CPU Fans (120 mm) 12 watts
Total Estimate: 567 watts
Recommended Power Supply Wattage: 700 watts

Check the latest price of the 450–750 watt Corsair SF Power Supplies on Amazon
(affiliate link).

Check out my Recommended Power Supplies for GTX 1080 GPUs below.

Amazon Affiliate Links

CORSAIR RM Series (2021), RM750, 750 Watt, 80 Plus Gold Certified, Fully Modular Power Supply

Check Price on Amazon

Corsair RMX Series, RM750x, 750 Watt, 80+ Gold Certified, Fully Modular Power Supply (Low Noise, Zero RPM Fan Mode, 105°C Capacitors, Fully Modular Cables, Compact Size) Black

Check Price on Amazon

Mid-Tier Estimate:

Mid-Tier Components Peak Power Consumption
GTX 1080 GPU 180 watts
Mid-Tier CPU (e. g., Intel Core i5 12600K) 150 watts
Motherboard 80 watts
2 M.2 or 2.5″ SSDs 18 watts
2 Case Fans (120 mm) 12 watts
2 CPU Fans (120 mm) 12 watts
Total Estimate: 452 watts
Recommended Power Supply Wattage: 600 watts

Check the latest price of the 450–750 watt Corsair SF Power Supplies on Amazon
(affiliate link).

Check out my Recommended Power Supplies for GTX 1080 GPUs below.

Power Efficiency

PSUs with higher efficiency ratings use less energy and produce less heat, improving their reliability and reducing noise.

The 80 PLUS certification program for power supplies helps to promote energy efficiency by indicating its efficiency rating.

Higher efficiency power supplies may have a higher upfront cost. However, they could potentially save you money on electricity in the long run.

Lower wattage PSUs will be more power-efficient even when idle. For this reason, you may be able to save more on electricity by getting the correct wattage of PSU than by getting the one with the best 80 PLUS rating.

PSU Efficiency Levels (115 V)
Certification Level 10% Load 20% Load 50% Load 100% Load
80 Plus 80% 80% 80%
80 Plus Bronze 82% 85% 82%
80 Plus Silver 85% 88% 85%
80 Plus Gold 87% 90% 87%
80 Plus Platinum 90% 92% 89%
80 Plus Titanium 90% 92% 94% 90%

Cables

Connectors

Make sure your PSU has the correct connectors to support the hardware in your system. Cheaper PSUs may cut costs on connectors and cables by offering fewer options and shorter lengths.

Check with your motherboard and graphics card documentation to determine which connector types are needed. Buy a popular, recently-released PSU; it will likely have the necessary connectors for a new PC build. However, if you use old components or an old power supply, you may find some incompatibilities.

Here are some common connector types that power supplies support:

  • 24-pin connector for the motherboard
  • 4/8-pin connector for the CPU
  • 6/8-pin connectors for graphics cards
  • SATA Power connector for each SATA HDD or SDD storage device

The latest graphics cards and PSUs are starting to support a new 16-pin PCIe 5.0 connector that replaces multiple 8-pin connectors.

Modular Cables

Typical power supplies come with various cables to connect your components. However, extra unused power cables can work against you by interrupting airflow.

In comparison, modular and semi-modular power supplies allow for attaching only the cables you need. As the name implies, semi-modular power supplies have some wires soldered on, while you can optionally connect others.

Cable Lengths

Most power supplies will have cables long enough to support mid-sized towers comfortably. If you have a full-size tower, you may want to check reviews and documentation to ensure that the cables are long enough to allow good cable management.

Power Supply Form Factors

Various form factors are available for power supplies. However, a standard-size desktop PC build will use an ATX power supply.

Small form factor PSUs allow for usage in many computer case shapes, including mini-PCs.

Power Supply Features

Overvoltage protection and short circuit protection can help to save your components in the case of a surge or accident.

LED lighting is another feature you might consider, depending on your PC goals.

Choosing a Cost-Effective Power Supply for the GTX 1080

Perhaps you live in a dorm or a family member’s house and don’t pay the power bill. Or maybe you don’t expect the computer to have heavy daily usage. In those cases, the lower upfront cost of a less efficient PSU may be the better choice.

On the other hand, if you care more about the electric bill or the environment and plan to maintain higher CPU or GPU usage, then a more efficient PSU may be better.

Don’t go too far over 150 W above your expected power needs. Rightsizing your power supply will keep electricity costs to a minimum, as higher wattage PSUs will consume some additional power, even when idle.

Recommended 750–1000 Watt PSU: Seasonic Prime Series

  • Titanium 80 PLUS efficiency rating means the Seasonic Prime TX is at least 94% efficient at 50% load.
  • Fully modular cabling allows you to optimize airflow and minimize clutter.
  • Silent during low usage.
  • 12-year warranty.
  • This series of power supplies comes in power outputs including 750, 850, and 1000 watts.
  • It also is available in a Gold rated (GX) version.

    Seasonic Prime TX-750

    Check Price on Amazon

    Amazon Affiliate Link

Recommended 450–750 Watt PSU: Corsair SF Series

  • Platinum 80 PLUS efficiency ratings.
  • Fully modular cabling allows you to optimize airflow and minimize clutter.
  • Near silent during low usage.
  • 7-year warranty.
  • This series of power supplies comes in power outputs including 450, 600, and 750 watts.

    Corsair SF Series 80+ Platinum Fully Modular Power Supply

    Check Price on Amazon

    Amazon Affiliate Link

Other Considerations When Building a PC

Want to brush up on other new technologies to consider when building a computer? Check out these articles:

  • Cases:
    • How to Choose the Best PC Case
  • CPUs:
    • Which Intel and AMD CPUs Support PCIe 5. 0?
    • Which Intel and AMD CPUs Support PCIe 4.0?
    • LGA 1700 CPU List
    • LGA 1200 CPU List
    • Look up an Intel or AMD CPU on TechReviewer for related recommendations:
  • CPU Coolers:
    • What is the Best Type of CPU cooler for a Gaming PC?
    • How to Choose a CPU Cooler for Your PC
    • Best LGA 1700 CPU Cooler for Intel’s 12th Gen Core Processors
    • Best AM4 CPU Cooler for AMD Processors
  • Storage:
    • Can an SSD Improve PC Gaming Performance? and Does an SSD Increase FPS for PC Gaming?
    • Storage Type Comparison: M.2, U.2, NVMe, SATA, SSDs, HDDs
  • Memory:
    • How to Choose the Best RAM for Your PC
    • How Much RAM Do You Need for Gaming? and Is 32 GB of RAM Worth It for Gaming?
    • DDR4 vs. DDR5? Which You Should Buy
    • Is DDR5 Worth It? The Benefits of DDR5 and What Is DDR5?
    • Which Intel and AMD CPUs Support DDR5?
  • PCI-Express:
    • Is PCIe 5. 0 Worth It?
  • Motherboards:
    • Which Motherboards Support PCIe 5.0?
    • Which Motherboards Support PCIe 4.0?
    • Which Motherboard Should You Buy for Intel’s 12th Gen CPUs?
  • Graphics Cards:
    • Which Graphics Cards Support PCIe 4.0?
  • Power Supplies:
    • How to Choose the Best Power Supply for a Gaming PC
    • How to Choose a PC Power Supply
  • Keyboards:
    • Best Mechanical Keyboard for Gaming
  • Monitors:
    • How to Choose a Gaming Monitor

Have a suggestion or correction for this article? Send us an email at:
[email protected]

You can also contact the author at:
[email protected]

GTX 1080 Power Consumption Guide

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click one, I may earn a commission at no cost to you. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

At its time, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 was considered a powerful graphics card that easily delivered the performance necessary to tackle top games in smooth HD quality. And over the last couple of years, with the shortage of better cards due to chip manufacturing issues, it’s seen something of a resurgence as a fantastic budget option that was, for a while at least, easily available.

While prices still shot up, they were still a reasonably priced solution if you wanted to play the latest games on decent settings. And now that prices are settling down again for the foreseeable future, they’re a solid choice for a low-cost graphics card ideal for budget builds.

But what power supply will you need to run one? Let’s take a look.

How Many Watts Does A GTX 1080 Use?

On average, a GTX 1080 graphics card will use around 175 watts of power when it’s gaming. It can use more if you overclock it, up to an average of 205 watts. It uses a lot less when idle, averaging just 7 watts.

The power consumption of a graphics card varies pretty wildly depending on what you’re doing on your PC. A lot of tasks don’t use the graphics card at all, and so if it’s just running your monitor then it’s considered idle. If you have more than one monitor the consumption can jump a little, but it’ll be minor, especially if the resolutions are the same on both.

It’s only when you’re gaming or rendering animations that it’ll be maxed out at around that 175-watt limit, and it may spike higher, although not above 180 watts according to tests – at least if you don’t overclock it.

Overclocking is when you push it past the restricted max settings set in place by the manufacturer to squeeze out more performance, at the risk of overheating. If you leave it on the standard settings you’ll be able to run games in HD and you’ll never see it draw more than 180 watts (Source).

Check Latest Price

How Many Watts Does A GTX 1080 Use Per Hour?

When used to play games or to render animations, the GTX 1080 will use 175 watt-hours per hour. This is the same as 0.175 kilowatt-hours per hour and means that over the course of an average week (8.5 hours of gaming) it will consume 1.4 kilowatt-hours.

As a guide, that means that it will cost roughly 20 cents to power the graphics card for a week (based on an average electricity cost of $0.14 per kilowatt-hour) which works out at just over $10 for the whole year.

But that’s just the graphics card, and really if you want to know how much your PC is going to cost you to run, you need to add the total of all your PC’s components together. 

The graphics card is normally the most power-hungry part, but depending on your processor and motherboard they could also consume a significant amount of electricity. Generally, the RAM and storage don’t need much power at all.

Think about your overall build, because if you’re using a GTX 1080 then you likely aren’t building a top-spec PC. However, if you are, and your GTX 1080 is just a placeholder until a better card becomes available, then your PC might use more power overall than you’d expect, which would impact your choice of power supply.

Read more: How Many Watts Does A Gaming PC Use?

What Power Supply Do I Need For A GTX 1080?

The minimum recommended power supply for a GTX 1080 is 500 watts or more. This is pretty reasonable, compared to some cards which have minimum recommendations which are arguably lower than they should be.

To work out the power supply you need, as a minimum you should add together the power consumption of your various components and then add an extra 20% to the total, leaving a little wiggle room for any spikes.

So, with a GTX 1080 drawing 175 watts, you should be able to comfortably build the rest of a PC that will draw no more than 225 watts, for a total of 400. Add on 20% and that’s 480, making a 500-watt supply a safe bet.

However, if you can afford to go a little higher then you should. You won’t be wasting electricity, because the power supply only draws what’s needed – it just means that if you decide to upgrade your PC in future, the power supply might be up for it.

What does determine how much power the supply actually draws is its efficiency rating. You’ll want one that’s 80+ Gold or better, otherwise, it will use up a lot of electricity just to work, which is given off as wasted heat.

Read more: Power Supply Ratings Explained

The Best Power Supply For A GTX 1080

I would suggest that a 500-watt power supply is a good choice for a GTX 1080, though you can always buy a better one if you have the spare money. You won’t see a huge cost increase if you nudge it up to 550 watts.

Check Latest Price

This EVGA 500 power supply is manufactured by a reputable brand and comes with a 5-year warranty, which should easily outlast the lifespan of your graphics card anyway. It’s a 500-watt supply that’s rated 80+ Gold, meaning it’s nice and efficient.

The only major drawback is the fact that it isn’t modular, so you can’t remove the cables you aren’t using. Instead, you’ll have to tuck them away inside the case. But for this low price point, it’s a decent sacrifice to make.

What GTX 1080 Power Cable Do I Need?

Some GTX 1080 graphics cards use a single 8-pin (6+2) connector, while others will use an 8- and a 6-pin, or two 8-pin connectors. Make sure your power supply has these connections free and that you use them to keep your graphics card working properly.

Don’t think that you can get away with only using one cable if you don’t have the other spare. You should always fully power a graphics card, otherwise it will either be massively underpowered or more likely it just won’t work.

GTX 1080 FAQs

What Is The Hashrate Of A GTX 1080?

The hashrate of a graphics card is the measurement of its mining power if you want to use it to mine cryptocurrency. If you’ve built a top-of-the-line PC with the very best processor, it may not quite be enough.

Is 650 watts enough for GTX 1080?

A 650-watt power supply is more than enough to power a GTX 1080 graphics card in most cases. The recommended minimum is 500 watts.

Is 750w PSU enough for GTX 1080?

A 750-watt power supply is more than enough to power a GTX 1080 graphics card for all but the most high-spec of PC builds. The recommended minimum is 500 watts.

Related Posts:

  • GTX 1650 Power Consumption Guide
  • GTX 1070 Power Consumption Guide
  • GTX 1060 Power Consumption Guide

GTX 1080 Ti Performance and overclocking

How we test

We’ve run all three of these cards on the open test bench that consists of the following components.

  • Motherboard: Asus Z170-Deluxe
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-6600K (Overclocked to 4.8GHz)
  • RAM: Corsair Vengeance 2666MHz, 16GB DDR4
  • Cooler: Corsair H60 liquid cooler
  • PSU: Corsair CX750M
  • SSD: Samsung 850 EVO
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit

I’ve run the numbers against the GTX 1080 and the Titan X, all with the very latest March 2017 drivers to give each GPU the fairest crack of the whip.

The games were run at their maximum settings with a healthy dose of anti-aliasing. Some might find the addition of AA controversial, but you’ll always get the best comparisons when pushing cards right to their very limits. I also ran each game at 5K, although here I’ll focus on the 4K results since this is what most people will be expecting.

 

GTX 1080 Ti – Performance and Benchmarks

(average fps)

To make the most of the 1080 Ti, we’ve added some benchmarks that represent a couple of more recent games to ensure it’s pushed to its limits. We start with a hit from last year.

Battlefield 1

DICE’s World War I epic is a great benchmark for high-end GPUs thanks to incredible detail, particle effects and GPU-sapping textures. I ran it at 4K and at 5K, although realistically most people will be maxing out at 4K for the time being.

Battlefield 1 doesn’t have a repeatable built-in benchmark, so the test is run during the on-rails section of the mission “Mud and Blood”.

The GTX 1080 Ti managed an average frame rate of 72fps, which is superb when you consider I’d turned everything to Ultra and whacked up anti-aliasing as well. Tweaking the graphics settings that aren’t as important to you will yield even better results.

Related: Best gaming PC specs to build yourself

Compared to the GTX 1080, which managed 55fps in the same test, the 1080 Ti is 24% faster.

Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor

It’s almost time to retire Shadow of Mordor from our benchmarking suite. 2014’s adventure epic has an excellent built-in benchmark, but with sequel Shadow of War coming soon, the 1080 Ti benchmark is perhaps its last hurrah.

At 4K and Ultra settings, 86.6fps is another good result, with no noticeable dips in frame rate during the test. Surprisingly for such an old title, Shadow of Mordor was a huge outlier in my tests, generating a 1080 Ti score that was 44% faster than the regular GTX 1080.

Rise of the Tomb-Raider

One of the toughest tests at high resolutions, Tomb Raider’s beautiful benchmark was where the 1080 Ti came closest to nudging the sub-60fps barrier, with an average score of 61. 5fps at maximum settings in 4K. This was 20% faster than the GTX 1080, which is a notable and noticeable improvement.

Drop a few graphics settings, including shadows and anti-aliasing, and you’ll have 70fps plus in Tomb Raider without any issues.

Hitman

Hitman released its final set of missions last year, but it still has a resource-hogging benchmark that really tests the mettle of GPUs.

In 4K, the GTX 1080 Ti managed an impressive 73.6fps at maximum settings, maintaining a relatively stable frame rate throughout the run. It wasn’t significantly faster than the GTX 1080, though, which put in an average frame rate of 59fps.

GTX 1080 Ti vs 1080

(average fps)

GTX 1080 Ti vs 980 Ti

I didn’t have a 980 Ti test with the latest drivers, but our benchmark results from last year point to 1080 Ti  performance that’s between 30% and 50% faster at 4K in Hitman, Tomb Raider and Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor.

GTX 1080 Ti vs Titan X

(average fps)

It was the comparison Nvidia made when it launched the 1080 Ti – and it is indeed faster for £300 less. If you own a Titan X, it isn’t exactly a tragedy; you’ve had world-beating performance for a full seven months, so think of it as a Titan Xclusive. Obviously, you’ve no need to upgrade.

GTX 1080 Ti – Overclocking, Heat and Power Consumption

The GTX 1080 Ti is a much more powerful beast than the GTX 1080, and considerably more so than the 980 Ti. Its TDP (thermal design power) is rated at 250W, the same as the 980 Ti and Titan X, while the GTX 1080 clocks in at just 180W. This could be all the difference for those with builds that have 500W power supplies.

Indeed, peak power draw for the entire TrustedReviews test system without overclocks was 412W, compared to the GTX 1080’s 340W in the same test. If you have a more powerful processor than the one we used, take a look at your power consumption readings to check you won’t over-stretch your PC’s power supply.

Running the Unigine Heaven benchmark on a loop in 4K, the GTX 1080 Ti was able to boost well beyond its stated 1,600MHz clock speed, happily sitting at around 1,800MHz at around 84oC.

Overclocking is as easy as ever, with the GTX 1080 Ti receptive to around 1,950MHz. I was quickly able to get a stable looping Unigine benchmark at 1,950MHz without the GPU throttling back. Temperatures maxed out at around 86oC on the automatic fan profile; I’d probably tweak it so it runs a little louder and cooler. Popping the fan speeds up to 70% reduced the temperature to a more comfortable 77oC.

It will be interesting to see whether third-party card manufacturers can encourage the 1080 Ti beyond 2GHz and what sort of cooling will be required in order to achieve such performance.

Memory overclocking was nice and easy: the 11GB of 11GHz GDDR5X memory was happy to receive a boost up to 11.8GHz without instability kicking in.

Nvidia says it has improved the fan design to run slightly quieter, but I didn’t hear a difference – and neither could my decibel meter. At 28,000rpm, both fans put out between 55 and 56dBA of noise, which is perfectly acceptable. In a compact, poorly insulated case with overclocks applied, it will likely become louder, but not significantly.

Should I buy the GTX 1080 Ti?

Buying the most expensive graphics card you can afford has long been a reviewer’s’ trope, but it’s almost always true. The 1080 Ti stretches this advice to its very limits with its super-high price, but with no competition from AMD at this end of the market, Nvidia has reached new performance territory.

When buying a 1080 Ti, don’t think about the Titan X – for what it offers, it’s rather overpriced at this point – but think more about the GTX 1080. With the 1080’s big price drop to £500, it’s become the new de facto choice for 4K gaming at High settings.

However, with 3GB more memory and at least 20% better performance, it’s hard not to recommend the 1080 Ti for those building the best system they possibly can for 4K and multi-screen gaming.

If you’re thinking about a direct upgrade from the 980 Ti, the performance increase is substantial; the 1080 Ti is up to twice as fast. If you have a 1080, your card has a lot of life left in it and it’s probably wise to stick with it for now.

Related: Best graphics card

If you don’t have a 4K monitor and don’t plan on buying one, the 1080 Ti is overkill – and even if you have a 1080 Ti but don’t always find yourself playing the very latest AAA games, you can save a couple of hundred quid on a 1080 or more on a 1070.

Verdict

A new performance benchmark – but you pay for it.

GeForce GTX 1080 [in 28 benchmarks]

NVIDIA
GeForce GTX 1080

  • PCIe 3.0 x16 interface
  • Core frequency 1607
  • Video memory 8 GB GDDR5X
  • Memory type GDDR5
  • Memory frequency 10 Gbps
  • Maximum resolution

Description

NVIDIA started GeForce GTX 1080 sales on May 6, 2016 at a suggested price of 599$. This is a top-end desktop video card based on Pascal architecture and 16 nm manufacturing process, primarily aimed at gamers. It has 8 GB of GDDR5 memory at 10 Gb/s, and coupled with a 256-bit interface, this creates a bandwidth of 320 Gb/s.

In terms of compatibility, this is a dual-slot PCIe 3.0 x16 card. The length of the reference version is 26.7 cm. An additional 8-pin power cable is required for connection, and the power consumption is 180 watts.

It provides good performance in tests and games at the level of

51.88%

from the leader, which is the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 Ti.


GeForce GTX
1080

or


GeForce RTX
3090 Ti

General information

Price now $ (0.7x) of 49999 (A100 SXM4)

The price is

for obtaining the index of the video taking into account the cost of other cards.

  • 0
  • 50
  • 100

Features

GeForce GTX 1080’s general performance parameters such as number of shaders, GPU core clock, manufacturing process, texturing and calculation speed. They indirectly speak about GeForce GTX 1080’s performance, but for precise assessment you have to consider its benchmark and gaming test results.

900DA 6 Pipelines0059 Floating point performance
Number of Stream Processors 2560 of 18432 (AD102)
8.873 gflops of 16384 (Radeon Pro Duo)

Compatibility and dimensions

1

Information on GeForce GTX 1080 compatibility with other computer components. Useful for example when choosing the configuration of a future computer or to upgrade an existing one. For desktop video cards, these are the interface and connection bus (compatibility with the motherboard), the physical dimensions of the video card (compatibility with the motherboard and case), additional power connectors (compatibility with the power supply).

Benchmark tests

These are the results of GeForce GTX 1080 rendering performance tests in non-gaming benchmarks. The overall score is set from 0 to 100, where 100 corresponds to the fastest video card at the moment.


Overall benchmark performance

This is our overall performance rating. We regularly improve our algorithms, but if you find any inconsistencies, feel free to speak up in the comments section, we usually fix problems quickly.

GTX 1080
51.88

  • Passmark
  • 3DMark 11 Performance GPU
  • 3DMark Vantage Performance
  • 3DMark Cloud Gate GPU
  • 3DMark Fire Strike Score
  • 3DMark Fire Strike Graphics
  • GeekBench 5 OpenCL
  • 3DMark Ice Storm GPU
  • GeekBench 5 Vulcan
  • GeekBench 5 CUDA
  • Unigine Heaven 3.0
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 maya-04
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 sw-03
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 snx-02
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 medical-01
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 catia-04
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Showcase
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 creo-01
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Maya
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 energy-01
  • SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 showcase-01
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Catia
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Solidworks
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Siemens NX
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Creo
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Medical
  • SPECviewperf 12 — Energy
  • Unigine Heaven 4. 0
Passmark

This is a very common benchmark included in the Passmark PerformanceTest package. He gives the card a thorough evaluation, running four separate tests for Direct3D versions 9, 10, 11, and 12 (the latter being done at 4K resolution whenever possible), and a few more tests using DirectCompute.

Benchmark coverage: 26%

GTX 1080
15323

3DMark 11 Performance GPU

3DMark 11 is Futuremark’s legacy DirectX 11 benchmark. He used four tests based on two scenes: one is several submarines exploring a sunken ship, the other is an abandoned temple deep in the jungle. All tests make extensive use of volumetric lighting and tessellation and, despite being run at 1280×720, are relatively heavy. Support for 3DMark 11 ended in January 2020 and is now being replaced by Time Spy.

Benchmark coverage: 17%

GTX 1080
29263

3DMark Vantage Performance

3DMark Vantage is an outdated DirectX 10 benchmark. It loads the graphics card with two scenes, one of which is a girl running away from some kind of military base located in a sea cave, and the other is a space fleet attacking defenseless planet. Support for 3DMark Vantage was discontinued in April 2017 and it is now recommended to use the Time Spy benchmark instead.

Benchmark coverage: 17%

GTX 1080
53598

3DMark Cloud Gate GPU

Cloud Gate is a legacy benchmark that uses DirectX 11 feature level 10, used to test home PCs and low-end laptops. It displays several scenes of some strange teleportation device launching spaceships into the unknown at a fixed resolution of 1280×720. As with the Ice Storm benchmark, it was deprecated in January 2020 and 3DMark Night Raid is now recommended instead.

Benchmark coverage: 14%

GTX 1080
119971

3DMark Fire Strike Score

Benchmark coverage: 14%

GTX 1080
16623

3DMark Fire Strike Graphics

Fire Strike is a DirectX 11 benchmark for gaming PCs. It features two separate tests showing a fight between a humanoid and a fiery creature that appears to be made of lava. Using resolution 1920×1080, Fire Strike shows quite realistic graphics and is quite demanding on hardware.

Benchmark coverage: 14%

GTX 1080
21409

GeekBench 5 OpenCL

Geekbench 5 is a widely used benchmark for graphics cards that combines 11 different test scenarios. All of these scenarios are based on the direct use of the processing power of the GPU, without the use of 3D rendering. This option uses the Khronos Group’s OpenCL API.

Benchmark coverage: 9%

GTX 1080
54453

3DMark Ice Storm GPU

Ice Storm Graphics is an obsolete benchmark, part of the 3DMark package. Ice Storm has been used to measure the performance of entry-level laptops and Windows-based tablets. It uses DirectX 11 feature level 9 to render a battle between two space fleets near a frozen planet at 1280×720 resolution. Support for Ice Storm ended in January 2020, now the developers recommend using Night Raid instead.

Benchmark coverage: 8%

GTX 1080
421474

GeekBench 5 Vulkan

Geekbench 5 is a widely used benchmark for graphics cards that combines 11 different test scenarios. All of these scenarios are based on the direct use of the processing power of the GPU, without the use of 3D rendering. This option uses the Vulkan API from AMD and the Khronos Group.

Benchmark coverage: 5%

GTX 1080
65453

GeekBench 5 CUDA

Geekbench 5 is a widely used benchmark for graphics cards that combines 11 different test scenarios. All of these scenarios are based on the direct use of the processing power of the GPU, without the use of 3D rendering. This option uses NVIDIA’s CUDA API.

Benchmark coverage: 5%

GTX 1080
51531

Unigine Heaven 3.

0

This is an old DirectX 11 based benchmark using the Unigine 3D game engine from the Russian company of the same name. It depicts a medieval fantasy city spread over several floating islands. Version 3.0 was released in 2012 and was replaced by Heaven 4.0 in 2013, which introduced several minor improvements, including a newer version of the Unigine engine.

Benchmark coverage: 5%

GTX 1080
269

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 maya-04

Benchmark coverage: 3%

GTX 1080
141

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 sw-03

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
61

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 snx-02

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
8

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 medical-01

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
34

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 catia-04

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
76

SPECviewperf 12 — Showcase

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
98

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 creo-01

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
54

SPECviewperf 12 — Maya

This part of the SPECviewperf 12 workstation benchmark uses the Autodesk Maya 13 engine to render a superhero power plant with over 700,000 polygons in six different modes.

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
140

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 energy-01

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
8.6

SPECviewperf 12 — specvp12 showcase-01

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
98

SPECviewperf 12 — Catia

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
76

SPECviewperf 12 — Solidworks

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
61

SPECviewperf 12 — Siemens NX

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
8

SPECviewperf 12 — Creo

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
54

SPECviewperf 12 — Medical

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
34

SPECviewperf 12 — Energy

Benchmark coverage: 2%

GTX 1080
8. 6

Unigine Heaven 4.0

This is an old DirectX 11 based benchmark, a newer version of Unigine 3.0 with relatively minor differences. It depicts a medieval fantasy city spread over several floating islands. The benchmark is still occasionally used despite its significant age, and it was released back in 2013.

Benchmark coverage: 1%

GTX 1080
3026


Mining hashrates

GeForce GTX 1080 performance in cryptocurrency mining. Usually the result is measured in mhash / s — the number of millions of solutions generated by the video card in one second.

Bitcoin / BTC (SHA256) 1045 Mh/s
Decred / DCR (Decred) 3.09 Gh/s
Ethereum / ETH (DaggerHashimoto) 27.63 Mh/s
Siacoin / SC (Sia) 2.28 Gh/s
Monero / XMR (CryptoNight) 0. 48 kh/s
Zcash / ZEC (Equihash) 470 Sol/s

Game tests

FPS in popular games on the GeForce GTX 1080, as well as compliance with system requirements. Remember that the official requirements of the developers do not always match the data of real tests.

Average FPS

Here are the average FPS values ​​for a large selection of popular games at various resolutions:

  • 1440p
    High Preset
  • 1440p
    Ultra Preset
  • 4K
    High Preset
  • 4K
    Ultra Preset
  • Cyberpunk 2077 50-55
    Assassin’s Creed Odyssey 92
    Assassin’s Creed Valhalla 50-55
    Battlefield 5 166
    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 134
    Cyberpunk 2077 50-55
    Far Cry 5 118
    Far Cry New Dawn 111
    Forza Horizon 4 140
    Hitman 3 50-55
    Horizon Zero Dawn 50-55
    Red Dead Redemption 2 96
    Shadow of the Tomb Raider 108
    Watch Dogs: Legion 50-55
    Assassin’s Creed Odyssey 83
    Assassin’s Creed Valhalla 50-55
    Battlefield 5 142
    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 113
    Cyberpunk 2077 50-55
    Far Cry 5 113
    Far Cry New Dawn 108
    Forza Horizon 4 137
    Hitman 3 50-55
    Horizon Zero Dawn 50-55
    Metro Exodus 74
    Red Dead Redemption 2 53
    Shadow of the Tomb Raider 98
    The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt 74
    Watch Dogs: Legion 50-55
    Assassin’s Creed Odyssey 63
    Assassin’s Creed Valhalla 50-55
    Battlefield 5 123
    Cyberpunk 2077 50-55
    Far Cry 5 104
    Far Cry New Dawn 98
    Forza Horizon 4 112
    The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt 81
    Watch Dogs: Legion 50-55
    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 74
    Hitman 3 50-55
    Horizon Zero Dawn 50-55
    Metro Exodus 45
    Red Dead Redemption 2 35
    Shadow of the Tomb Raider 64
    Assassin’s Creed Odyssey 49
    Assassin’s Creed Valhalla 50-55
    Battlefield 5 98
    Cyberpunk 2077 50-55
    Far Cry 5 77
    Far Cry New Dawn 82
    Forza Horizon 4 93
    Watch Dogs: Legion 50-55
    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 42
    Hitman 3 50-55
    Horizon Zero Dawn 50-55
    Metro Exodus 28
    Red Dead Redemption 2 21
    Shadow of the Tomb Raider 32
    The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt 56
    Assassin’s Creed Odyssey 33
    Assassin’s Creed Valhalla 50-55
    Battlefield 5 53
    Cyberpunk 2077 50-55
    Far Cry 5 42
    Far Cry New Dawn 47
    Forza Horizon 4 65
    Watch Dogs: Legion 50-55

    Relative performance

    Overall GeForce GTX 1080 performance compared to its nearest desktop competitor.


    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070
    105.05

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 12GB
    104.32

    AMD Radeon RX 6600XT
    104.09

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080
    100

    AMD Radeon RX Vega 64
    95.61

    AMD Radeon RX 5700
    95.43

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti
    95.26

    Competitor from AMD

    We believe that the nearest equivalent to GeForce GTX 1080 from AMD is Radeon RX 6600 XT, which is 4% faster on average and higher by 4 positions in our rating.


    Radeon RX
    6600XT

    Compare

    Here are some of AMD’s closest competitors to the GeForce GTX 1080:

    AMD Radeon VII
    109.85

    AMD Radeon RX 5700XT 50th Anniversary
    108. 42

    AMD Radeon RX 6600XT
    104.09

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080
    100

    AMD Radeon RX Vega 64
    95.61

    AMD Radeon RX 5700
    95.43

    AMD Radeon RX 6600
    93.79

    Other video cards

    Here we recommend several video cards that are more or less similar in performance to the reviewed one.


    Radeon RX
    Vega 64

    Compare


    GeForce GTX
    1070 Ti

    Compare


    GeForce RTX
    2070

    Compare


    GeForce RTX
    2060

    Compare


    GeForce GTX
    980 Ti

    Compare


    Radeon
    VII

    Compare

    Recommended Processors

    According to our statistics, these processors are most often used with the GeForce GTX 1080.


    Ryzen 5
    3600

    4.8%


    Core i7
    7700K

    3.7%


    Ryzen 5
    2600

    3.7%


    Core i5
    10400F

    3.4%


    Core i5
    9400F

    2.8%


    Core i7
    6700K

    2.7%


    Core i7
    8700K

    2.6%


    Core i7
    7700

    2%


    Core i7
    8700

    1.7%


    Ryzen 5
    1600

    1. 4%

    User rating

    Here you can see the rating of the video card by users, as well as put your own rating.


    Tips and comments

    Here you can ask a question about GeForce GTX 1080, agree or disagree with our judgements, or report an error or mismatch.


    Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

    Best GeForce GTX 1080 graphics cards in 2020

    Gaming peripherals and hardware

    03/06/2020

    The GeForce GTX 1080 is one of the fastest graphics cards available on the market today.

    This is a fairly high-quality graphics processor from Nvidia, built on the Pascal GPU architecture, with 2560 CUDA cores and 8 GB of GDDR5X memory with a 256-bit interface. GDDR5X memory is faster and more efficient than the regular GDDR5 found in most graphics cards, be they budget, mid-range or high-end models. The GeForce GTX 1080 runs all the latest games at 1440p high and ultra settings, but when playing at 4K resolution, you may need to lower some graphics settings (depending on the title).

    GeForce GTX 1080 supports VR and SLI (multi-GPU setup), DirectX 12, OpenGL 4.5, Vulkan, Nvidia Ansel, G-Sync (for smooth gaming experience), Nvidia GPU Boost. The maximum power consumption of the card is 180W and it requires a 500W power supply to operate. The main competitor of the GeForce GTX 1080 is AMD’s Radeon RX Vega 64, built on the Vega architecture.

    You can find various variations of the GeForce GTX 1080 from different brands, which is why quite often users are confused when they plan to purchase this model. Thus, in this article, we will list the best GTX 1080 graphics cards and describe each of them.

    Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080 G1 Gaming

    • CUDA Cores: 2560
    • Processor frequency: 1721/1860 MHz (OC mode)
    • Memory frequency: 10010 MHz
    • Memory capacity: 8 GB type GDDR5X
    • Memory interface: 256 bit
    • Bus interface: PCI Express 3. 0
    • DirectX: 12
    • OpenGL: 4.5
    • Output ports: DisplayPort x 3, HDMI, DVI
    • The

    GTX 1080 is the best value for money graphics card that’s great for a high-end gaming PC. The Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080 G1 Gaming has a WINDFORCE 3X cooling system with triple coolers that control the temperature well. In addition, the heatsink consists of copper heat pipes for better heat dissipation from the graphics card components. On the back of the device is a metal panel that provides extra strength to the card.

    The video card is already overclocked, which means you will get better performance than the reference GTX 1080. It requires one 8-pin PCI-E power connector and a 500W power supply.

    ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 OC

    • CUDA Cores: 2560
    • Processor frequency: 1721/1860 MHz (OC mode)
    • Memory frequency: 11100 MHz (OC mode)
    • Memory capacity: 8 GB type GDDR5X
    • Memory interface: 256 bit
    • Bus interface: PCI Express 3. 0
    • DirectX: 12
    • OpenGL: 4.5
    • Output ports: Display Port x 2, HDMI x 2, DVI

    If you’re looking for the fastest and most overclocked air-cooled GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card, look no further than the ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 OC. This is a real monster, equipped with three coolers and a heatsink with heat pipes. Asus STRIX means the coolers shut down completely at low temperatures, making the graphics card very quiet. They turn on when the temperature of the device rises, mainly while playing demanding titles.

    Shroud includes Aura Sync LED lighting and HDMI ports with VR support. The power consumption of this model is slightly higher as it requires 6-pin and 8-pin PCI-Express power connectors. You can also check out the regular (non-OC) version of this card just below — it’s slightly lower in price.

    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW GAMING Hybrid

    • CUDA Cores: 2560
    • Processor frequency: 1721/1860 MHz
    • Memory frequency: 10000 MHz
    • Memory capacity: 8 GB type GDDR5X
    • Memory interface: 256 bit
    • Bus interface: PCI Express 3. 0
    • DirectX: 12
    • OpenGL: 4.5
    • Output ports: DP x 3, HDMI, DVI

    If you plan to overclock your video card, you should purchase a model with improved cooling and more power phases. So here we have the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW GAMING Hybrid, a liquid/water cooled GTX 1080 graphics card with 10+2 power phases for maximum overclocking stability. Thanks to the water cooling, the card is also very quiet. In addition, the device is already overclocked out of the box, but you can overclock it even more using the EVGA Precision X software.

    The card draws more power than other models and requires two 8-pin PCIe power connectors and a 550W — 600W power supply.

    MSI GeForce GTX 1080 GAMING X

    • CUDA Cores: 2560
    • Processor frequency: 1708/1847 MHz (OC mode)
    • Memory frequency: 10108 (OC mode)
    • Memory size: 8 GB GDDR5X
    • Memory interface: 256 bit
    • Bus interface: PCI Express 3. 0
    • DirectX: 12
    • OpenGL: 4.5
    • Output ports: DisplayPort x 3, HDMI, DVI

    Next in line is the quiet and beautiful MSI GeForce GTX 1080 GAMING X graphics card. Already overclocked, MSI’s GTX 1080 is equipped with a TWIN FROZR VI cooling system with two TORX 2.0 coolers. At temperatures below 60°C, both fans stop completely, making the card completely silent in operation. They start working above 60°C but remain very quiet.

    The card supports VR and has cool RGB LED lighting. You can customize various processor functions using MSI Afterburner. Power requires one 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connector from the PSU. Overall, this is a great card that boasts high performance, features, and is very quiet even when playing games.

    ZOTAC GeForce GTX 1080 Mini

    • CUDA Cores: 2560
    • Processor frequency: 1620/1759 MHz
    • Memory clock: 10 GHz
    • Memory capacity: 8 GB type GDDR5X
    • Memory interface: 256 bit
    • Bus interface: PCI Express 3. 0
    • DirectX: 12
    • OpenGL: 4.5
    • Output ports: DP x 3, HDMI, DVI

    Most Geforce GTX 1080 cards are large form factors and require a full-tower or mid-tower case to fit properly. But if your PC is quite compact, then you should pay attention to ZOTAC GeForce GTX 1080 Mini. This graphics card is only 211mm long and fits most small form factor cases, including mini-ITX.

    The processor has an IceStorm cooler, consisting of two fans and a cooler with copper heat pipes. The cooler does an excellent job of dissipating heat even during intense CPU loads. The graphics card is already slightly overclocked right out of the box, although it can be overclocked even further. The power consumption of the processor is moderate — it requires one 8-pin PCIe power connector and a 500W power supply.

    Source: graphicscardhub.com

    $69 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti introduced9

    News

    Volodymyr Skripin
    Volodymyr Skripin

    As expected, as part of the ongoing GDC 2017 conference in San Francisco, NVIDIA introduced a new GeForce GTX 1080 Ti video card based on the current Pascal graphics architecture. According to the manufacturer, the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is the “fastest” of all NVIDIA graphics cards released. The performance advantage declared by the manufacturer over the GTX 1080 model reaches an average of 35%. In addition, as stated, at a price of $699, the new GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is even faster than NVIDIA’s $1,200 older Titan X Pascal for machine learning and AI systems. True, the manufacturer does not say how much faster.

    Help

    And although the new GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is based on the same GP102 GPU as the NVIDIA Titan X Pascal, some of its characteristics have been cut compared to the older model. The number of CUDA cores remained unchanged at 3584, but the GDDR5X memory was reduced from 12 to 11 GB, and the memory bus width was reduced from 384 to 352 bits. There are 11 memory chips soldered on the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti PCB, but the good news is that they use newer chips than the Titan X Pascal, operating at an effective frequency of 11 GHz. In total, we have a throughput of 484 GB / s — against 480 GB / s for Titan X Pascal. Here’s the answer to you, how did it happen that the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti turned out to be faster than the Titan X Pascal.

    In addition to the narrower interface and less memory, there is at least one other feature that has been downgraded. This is the number of raster operation blocks — the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti has 88 of them versus 96 for the Titan X Pascal. The remaining technical characteristics of the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti are clearly visible on the slide above: the GPU contains 12 billion transistors, 28 geometric processing units and 224 texture processing units, the core clock speed in Boost mode reaches 1.6 GHz (the possibility of overclocking up to 2 GHz is mentioned).

    A number of improvements in the memory subsystem are mentioned separately, which are not available in other models of the Pascal family — new memory chips and an optimized interface. Finally, the company publicly announced NVIDIA’s Tiled Rendering Technology, one of the secret developments that the company has been hiding from consumers since the Maxwell architecture. This is one of those technologies that help NVIDIA maintain its leadership in the market. It improves the efficiency of the memory subsystem due to optimizations in terms of rendering — splitting polygons into square areas. Thus, the geometry and textures of the rendered object do not leave the chip (L2 cache), which in turn reduces the number of cache misses (the situation when the necessary information is not found when accessing the cache) and reduces bandwidth requirements.

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    The GeForce GTX 1080 Ti uses a new seven-phase power supply subsystem with dual FET VRM voltage regulators to reduce the load and therefore lower the temperature of the MOSFET transistors. In addition, the design of the cooler includes an evaporation chamber. All this made the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti quieter (up to 2.5 dB noise reduction) and cooler (up to 5°C).

    Consuming 250W, the card requires 6-pin and 8-pin PCI-E cables.

    Pre-orders for the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti will start taking tomorrow, and the manufacturer and its partners promise to start deliveries on March 10th. In the near future, announcements of various versions of the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti from NVIDIA partners are expected.

    Updated:

    At the request of readers, here is a summary comparison table of the characteristics of the GTX 1080, GTX 1080 Ti and TITAN X models.

    GeForce

    GTX 1080

    GeForce

    GTX 1080 Ti

    TITAN X
    Graphic architecture Pascal Pascal Pascal
    Number of CUDA cores 2560 3584 3584
    GPU base frequency, MHz 1607 n/a 1417
    GPU Boost Clock 1733 1600 (overclocking to 2000) 1531
    Memory, GB 8 (GDDR5X) 11 (GDDR5X) 12 (GDDR5X)
    Bit width of the memory exchange bus, bit 256 352 384
    Effective video memory frequency, MHz 10000 11000 10000
    Video memory bandwidth, GB/s 320 484 480
    Number of texture units, pcs. 160 224 224
    Number of raster operations blocks (ROPs), pcs. 64 88 96
    Number of Graphics Processing Clusters, pcs 4 6 6
    Number of streaming multiprocessors, pcs 20 28 28
    Outlets DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0b,
    Dual-Link DVI
    DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0b,
    Dual-Link DVI
    DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0b,
    Dual-Link DVI
    Display support 7.680 x 4.320 @ 60Hz,
    HDCP 2.2
    7.680 x 4.320 @ 60Hz,
    HDCP 2.2
    7.680 x 4.320 @ 60Hz,
    HDCP 2.2
    Video card dimensions, mm (L × H × D) 268 × 102 × 37, two expansion slots 268 × 102 × 37, two expansion slots 268 × 102 × 37, two expansion slots
    Interface PCI-Express x16 (v3. 0) PCI-Express x16 (v3.0) PCI-Express x16 (v3.0)
    Auxiliary power connectors one eight-pin one eight-pin + one six-pin one eight-pin + one six-pin
    Peak power consumption, W 180 250 (?) 250
    Power supply power requirements, W 500 n/a 600
    MSRP at launch, USD 699 699 1200

    Source: techpowerup and NVIDIA

    Geforce GTX 1080 Ti, NVIDIA, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, Pascal, Titan X Pascal, Video cards

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Review. Benchmarks and Specifications

    The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphics card (GPU) is ranked #17 in our performance rankings. Manufacturer: NVIDIA. Runs NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti with a minimum clock speed of 1481 MHz. The graphics chip is equipped with an acceleration system and can operate in turbo mode or when overclocked at a frequency of 1582 MHz. The RAM size is 11 GB GB with a clock speed of 11000 MHz and a bandwidth of 484.4 GB/s.

    The power consumption of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is 250 Watt and the process technology is only 16 nm. Below you will find key compatibility, sizing, technology, and gaming performance test results. You can also leave comments if you have any questions.

    Let’s take a closer look at the most important features of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. To have an idea of ​​which video card is better, we recommend using the comparison service.

    4.2
    From 500
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    General information

    The base set of information will help you find out the release date of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphics card and its purpose (laptops or PCs), as well as the price at the time of release and the average current cost. This data also includes the architecture used by the manufacturer and the video processor code name.

    Performance Rating Position: 31
    Value for money: 19.29
    Architecture: Pascal
    Code name: GP102
    Type: Desktop
    Release date: February 28, 2017 (4 years ago)
    Starting price: $699
    Current price: $780 (1.1x MSRP)
    Value for money: 37.27
    GPU Code Name: GP102
    Market segment: Desktop

    Specifications

    This is important information that determines all the performance specifications of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphics card. The smaller the technological process of manufacturing a chip, the better (in modern realities). The clock frequency of the core is responsible for its speed (direct correlation), while signal processing is carried out by transistors (the more transistors, the faster the calculations are performed, for example, in cryptocurrency mining).

    Conveyors: 3584
    Core Clock: 1481 MHz
    Acceleration: 1582 MHz
    Number of transistors: 11,800 million
    Process: 16nm
    Power consumption (TDP): 250 Watt
    Number of texels processed in 1 second: 354.4
    Floating point: 11. 340 gflops
    Maximum temperature: 91°C
    Pipelines / CUDA cores: 3584
    Acceleration speed: 1600 MHz
    Number of transistors: 11,800 million
    Estimated heat output: 250 Watt

    Dimensions, connectors and compatibility

    There are many form factors of PC cases and laptop sizes today, so it is extremely important to know the length of the video card and its connection types (except for laptop versions). This will help make the upgrade process easier, as Not all cases can accommodate modern video cards.

    Interface: PCIe 3.0 x16
    Length: 10.5″ (26.7cm)
    Additional power: 1x 6-pin + 1x 8-pin
    SLI options: +
    Recommended system power (PSU): 600 Watt

    Memory (frequency and overclocking)

    The internal memory is used to store data when performing calculations. Modern games and professional graphics applications place high demands on the amount and speed of memory. The higher this parameter, the more powerful and faster the video card. Memory type, size and bandwidth for NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti + turbo overclocking option.

    Memory type: GDDR5X
    Maximum RAM amount: 11GB
    Memory bus width: 352 Bit
    Memory frequency: 11000 MHz
    Memory bandwidth: 484.4 GB/s
    Shared memory:

    Support for ports and displays

    As a rule, all modern video cards have several types of connections and additional ports, for example HDMI and DVI . Knowing these features is very important in order to avoid problems connecting a video card to a monitor or other peripherals.

    Display connections: 1x HDMI, 3x DisplayPort
    G-SYNC support: +
    Multi monitor support: +
    HDMI: +

    Technologies

    Each graphics card manufacturer complements its products with proprietary technologies that are used both in games and in the workflow. Below is a list of features that will be useful to you.

    3D Vision: +
    GPU Boost: 3.0
    CUDA: +
    Ansel: +
    Virtual Reality: +

    API Support

    All NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti supported APIs are listed below. This is a minor factor that does not greatly affect the overall performance.

    DirectX: 12 (12_1)
    OpenGL: 4.5
    Vulkan: +
    Shader Model: 6.4
    OpenCL: 1.2

    Overall gaming performance

    All tests are based on FPS. Let’s take a look at where the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti ranks in the gaming performance test (calculated according to the game developer’s recommendations for system requirements; it may differ from actual situations).

    Select games
    Horizon Zero DawnDeath StrandingF1 2020Gears TacticsDoom EternalHunt ShowdownEscape from TarkovHearthstoneRed Dead Redemption 2Star Wars Jedi Fallen OrderNeed for Speed ​​HeatCall of Duty Modern Warfare 2019GRID 2019Ghost Recon BreakpointFIFA 20Borderlands 3ControlF1 2019League of LegendsTotal War: Three KingdomsRage 2Anno 1800The Division 2Dirt Rally 2. 0AnthemMetro ExodusFar Cry New DawnApex LegendsJust Cause 4Darksiders IIIFarming Simulator 19Battlefield VFallout 76Hitman 2Call of Duty Black Ops 4Assassin´s Creed OdysseyForza Horizon 4FIFA 19Shadow of the Tomb RaiderStrange BrigadeF1 2018Monster Hunter WorldThe Crew 2Far Cry 5World of Tanks enCoreX-Plane 11.11Kingdom Come: DeliveranceFinal Fantasy XV BenchmarkFortniteStar Wars Battlefront 2Need for Speed ​​PaybackCall of Duty WWIIAssassin´s Creed OriginsWolfenstein II: The New ColossusDestiny 2MEDLE-Evil Within : Shadow of WarFIFA 18Ark Survival EvolvedF1 2017Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds (2017)Team Fortress 2Dirt 4Rocket LeaguePreyMass Effect AndromedaGhost Recon WildlandsFor HonorResident Evil 7Dishonored 2Call of Duty Infinite WarfareTitanfall 2Farming Simulator 17Civilization VIBattlefield 1Mafia 3Deus Ex Mankind DividedMirror’s Edge CatalystOverwatchDoomAshes of the SingularityHitman 2016The DivisionFar Cry PrimalXCOM 2Rise of the Tomb RaiderRainbow Six SiegeAssassin’s Creed SyndicateStar Wars BattlefrontFallout 4Call of Duty: Black Ops 3Anno 2205World of WarshipsDota 2 RebornThe Witcher 3Dirt RallyGTA VDragon Age: InquisitionFar Cry 4Assassin’s Creed Un ityCall of Duty: Advanced WarfareAlien: IsolationMiddle-earth: Shadow of MordorSims 4Wolfenstein: The New OrderThe Elder Scrolls OnlineThiefX-Plane 10. 25Battlefield 4Total War: Rome IICompany of Heroes 2Metro: Last LightBioShock InfiniteStarCraft II: Heart of the SwarmSimCityTomb RaiderCrysis 3Hitman: AbsolutionCall of Duty : Black Ops 2World of Tanks v8Borderlands 2Counter-Strike: GODirt ShowdownDiablo IIIMass Effect 3The Elder Scrolls V: SkyrimBattlefield 3Deus Ex Human RevolutionStarCraft 2Metro 2033Stalker: Call of PripyatGTA IV — Grand Theft AutoLeft 4 DeadTrackmania Nations ForeverCall of Duty 4 — Modern WarfareSupreme Commander — FA BenchCrysis — GPU BenchmarkWorld in Conflict — BenchmarkHalf Life 2 — Lost Coast BenchmarkWorld of WarcraftDoom 3Quake 3 Arena — TimedemoHalo InfiniteFarming Simulator 22Battlefield 2042Forza Horizon 5Riders RepublicGuardians of the GalaxyBack 4 BloodDeathloopF1 2021Days GoneResident Evil VillageHitman 3Cyberpunk 2077Assassin´s Creed ch Dogs LegionMafia Definitive EditionCyberpunk 2077 1.5GRID LegendsDying Light 2Rainbow Six ExtractionGod of War

    low

    1280×720

    med.

    1920×1080

    high

    1920×1080

    ultra

    1920×1080

    QHD

    2560×1440

    4K

    3840×2160

    Horizon Zero Dawn (2020)

    low

    1280×720

    med.

    1920×1080

    high

    1920×1080

    ultra

    1920×1080

    QHD

    2560×1440

    4K

    3840×2160

    Death Stranding (2020)

    low

    1280×720

    med.

    1920×1080

    high

    1920×1080

    ultra

    1920×1080

    QHD

    2560×1440

    4K

    3840×2160

    F1 2020 (2020)

    low

    1280×720

    248

    med.

    1920×1080

    213

    high

    1920×1080

    207

    ultra

    1920×1080

    153

    QHD

    2560×1440

    118

    4K

    3840×2160

    71.9

    Gears Tactics (2020)

    low

    1280×720

    253

    med.

    1920×1080

    204

    high

    1920×1080

    137

    ultra

    1920×1080

    119

    QHD

    2560×1440

    88.6

    4K

    3840×2160

    51.9

    Doom Eternal (2020)

    low

    1280×720

    med.

    1920×1080

    high

    1920×1080

    ultra

    1920×1080

    179

    QHD

    2560×1440

    131

    4K

    3840×2160

    67. 6

    Description
    5 Stutter — The performance of this video card with this game has not yet been studied enough. Based on interpolated information from graphics cards of a similar performance level, the game is likely to stutter and display low frame rates.
    May Stutter — The performance of this video card with this game has not yet been studied enough. Based on interpolated information from graphics cards of a similar performance level, the game is likely to stutter and display low frame rates.
    30 Fluent — According to all known benchmarks with the specified graphic settings, this game is expected to run at 25 fps or more
    40 Fluent — According to all known benchmarks with the specified graphic settings, this game is expected to run at 35fps or more
    60 Fluent — Based on all known benchmarks with the specified graphic settings, this game is expected to run at 58fps or more
    May Run Fluently — The performance of this video card with this game has not yet been studied enough. Based on interpolated information from graphics cards of a similar performance level, the game is likely to show smooth frame rates.
    ? Uncertain — testing this video card in this game showed unexpected results. A slower card could deliver higher and more consistent frame rates while running the same reference scene.
    Uncertain — The performance of this video card in this game has not yet been studied enough. It is not possible to reliably interpolate data based on the performance of similar cards in the same category.
    The value in the fields reflects the average frame rate across the entire database. To get individual results, hover over a value.

    AMD equivalent

    AMD Radeon VII

    Compare

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti in benchmark results

    Benchmarks help determine performance in standard NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti benchmarks. We have compiled a list of the most famous benchmarks in the world so that you can get accurate results for each of them (see description). Pre-testing the graphics card is especially important when there are high loads, so that the user can see how the graphics processor copes with calculations and data processing.

    Overall performance in benchmarks

    NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 Mobile

    82.02%

    ATI Radeon HD 3200

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    81.31%

    ATI Radeon X850XT

    NVIDIA GeForce 9100

    The Ice Storm multi-platform test shows the performance of a graphics card using the screen rendering method. Standard test conditions — 1280*720 (720p).

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q

    401038

    AMD Radeon RX Vega 64

    395092

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    394694

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Max-Q

    387951

    AMD Radeon RX 480

    383333

    Unlike Ice Storm, 3DMark’s Cloud Gate test uses more resource intensive scenes. The better the final score, the faster your graphics card. Processing is done with DirectX 10.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080

    143576

    AMD Radeon RX 5700XT

    143181

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    142490

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Mobile

    141486

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 SLI

    140180

    This is an advanced graphics card benchmark. When using DirectX 11 for processing, typical testing time is 15 minutes. The higher the score, the faster the graphics card.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Super

    AMD Radeon RX 5700

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Super

    AMD Radeon RX 5600XT

    Complex graphic scenes require all the graphics card resources. They use the entire RAM and computing power. The test’s results can be viewed below.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    AMD Radeon VII

    NVIDIA Titan X Pascal

    This benchmark analyzes the gaming performance of a graphics card using Direct X 11 (multithreading, tessellation, shader calculations).

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super

    AMD Radeon VII

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    AMD Radeon RX 5700XT

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Mobile

    This is a world famous benchmark for determining the performance of a graphics card in applications. In testing, graphic models and real program scenes are used.

    NVIDIA Quadro M2000M

    NVIDIA Quadro M1200

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Mobile

    NVIDIA Titan X Pascal

    Siemens NX (snx-02) is a dedicated SPECviewperf 12 suite for graphical load tracing. It includes many rendering modes.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Mobile

    This test is based on Autodesk Showcase 2013. It introduces shading and shadow projection modes.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA Titan X Pascal

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Super

    This is a special set of benchmarks designed as a 3D rendering application. It uses all the resources of the video card.

    NVIDIA Quadro RTX 5000 Max-Q

    NVIDIA Quadro P5000 Mobile

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Mobile

    The Maya-04 set, developed by SPECviewperf 12, contains many rendering modes, including fills, anti-aliasing, and transparency.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Super

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Super

    This benchmark offers a test of the video card’s power in various rendering modes (anti-aliasing, reflection fill and edge fill).

    NVIDIA Quadro P2000 Mobile

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    AMD Radeon RX Vega 64

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Mobile

    This test of video card power and speed includes rendering aircraft and car models. The better the score, the more powerful your graphics card.

    NVIDIA Quadro P4000 Max-Q

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Super

    NVIDIA Quadro P3000 Mobile

    NVIDIA Quadro RTX 5000 Mobile

    NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 Mobile

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    AMD Radeon RX Vega 64

    NVIDIA Quadro P3200

    Passmark is an excellent benchmark that is updated regularly and shows relevant graphics card performance information.

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Super

    NVIDIA TITAN Xp

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    NVIDIA Quadro RTX 5000

    NVIDIA TITAN V

    4.2
    From 500
    Hitesti Grade

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    NVIDIA GEFORCE RTX 3060

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060

    AMD Radeon VII

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti

    NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M

    AMD Radeon RX 6600XT

    Intel Iris Graphics 550

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Super

    NVIDIA Quadro P520

    Review Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080

    Pros

    • Fantastic performance
    • Great design
    • Very fast

    Cons

    • Doesn’t reach 60fps in our 4K tests
    • More expensive than previous generations

    Key Features

    • Recall Price: £620. 00
    • New Pascal architecture
    • 8 GB GDDR5X
    • 2560 CUDA cores
    • Base clock 1607 MHz
    • Memory bandwidth 320 GB/s

    Editor’s Note: The GTX 1080 is about to add ray tracing support very soon. Nvidia announced plans to add ray tracing support via a drive upgrade in its GDC keynote earlier in March. An update that adds ray tracing to GTX cards is scheduled for April and will allow compatible Direct X games to take advantage of next-generation graphics technology. Ray tracing was introduced alongside Nvidia’s newest RTX generation, the Turing graphics cards. The purpose of this technology is to give games more realistic shadow, light, and reflection effects. We will test the GTX 1080 when the update comes out. Then check out how the GTX 1080 handles ray tracing.

    Read our original 2016 review below

    What is the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080? The

    GTX 1080 is Nvidia’s latest high-end graphics card ready to take part in this year’s 2-stage VR and 4K attack. Its performance this year makes it the most powerful consumer-grade graphics card to date (ignoring the outrageous Titan X), and we won the Video Card of the Year award at our 2016 Reliable Reviews awards ceremony.

    If you’re wondering why Nvidia has created such a huge song and dance over the release of a consumer graphics card, it’s because the company has spent «billions» to bring its new architecture to market and now it has to crunch the numbers. Both financially and in terms of GPU performance.

    While the GTX 1080’s performance is undeniable, you definitely don’t need to spend £600 on it unless your gaming ambitions extend to the world of 4K and VR.

    Video: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080

    review technologies and specifications of the GTX 1080 in a few paragraphs. If this is not to your liking, you can skip our benchmarking tests on the second page of this review.

    Still with me? Good. Here comes the technology. ..

    To improve performance and efficiency in hardware, Nvidia has moved away from its previous Maxwell architecture and introduced a new technique called Pascal. Pascal’s key feature is that it uses a smaller manufacturing process (16 nanometers vs. 28 nm), which means more transistors for any given piece of silicon.

    This increases performance with much less impact on power consumption (and thus heat and noise) than simply increasing the number of transistors using a larger piece of silicon. 1080 GPU layout diagram. Count the CUDA cores

    What really matters to you and me is that this allows you to increase the number of CUDA cores that do most of the work. In the case of the GTX 1080, there are 2560 of them, which is about a quarter more than the 2048 on the GTX 980. The clock speeds are also higher, with the number of cycles per second from 1126 MHz to 1607 MHz. All this comes with a peak power consumption increase of only 15W (from 165W to 180W) over the GTX 980.

    Peak power consumption for our entire test system was 286W compared to 270W and 336W for the GTX 980 and GTX 980Ti respectively, and peak temperatures never exceeded 75 degrees with Nvidia’s fairly conservative low fan speed preset.

    Related: The Best Gaming PC Specs You Can Build Yourself

    Even those used to big leaps in technology can’t help but be surprised.

    Not only is computing power improving; we are also finally seeing a new development when it comes to memory. The GTX 1080 uses GDDR5X memory — like your PC or laptop RAM, but much faster and more expensive — replacing the GDDR5 found in previous generations of Nvidia GPUs.

    With 8 GB of memory compared to 4 GB in the GTX 980, a higher memory clock speed of 10,000 MHz compared to 7,000 MHz, the GTX 1080 has 43% more memory bandwidth than the GTX 980. This means that there is more room for graphical data and that all that data can move at a faster rate.

    Similar: Best Desktop PCs

    Now let’s move on to the physical hardware of the GTX 1080 itself. The Founders Edition card in question here is, frankly, not a product you will end up buying, and by the time you read This review will probably show up a few third party alternative GTX 1080s from Asus, MSI. and EVGA are available for less.

    However, if you pick up the Founders Edition card, you won’t be disappointed with its design. One member of the Trusted team commented that it looks like «a Decepticon disguised as a graphics card». The sharp metal edges and angular design are definitely eye-catching and give the GTX 1080 a real sense of occasion. If this is what you need, you will be happy to have it in your equipment.

    Related: Meet Vulkan, the future of gaming

    Quiet here too. A single fan can also be quiet — your PC case will have a lot of other components noisier than your GTX 1080, though if you choose to overclock (more on that later), you’ll certainly hear some hustling if you’re too far away. However, in normal use, even with prolonged use of intense VR titles, I could barely hear the sound.

    In terms of ports, the GTX 1080 is pretty promising. There is one DVI port, an HDMI port, and three DisplayPort connectors. The latter is what lies at the heart of the future: whatever the final DisplayPort 1.3 and 1.4 specs are, the GTX 1080 is ready and able to push 4K content at 120Hz, 5K at 60Hz, and 8K (yes, really) at 60Hz using two connector.

    HDMI 2.0b connector that can play content in 4K at 60Hz. The

    GTX 1080 will also support HDR gaming and video playback thanks to its ability to decode HEVC video.

    In terms of software, Nvidia goes above and beyond when it comes to multi-monitor and VR support. Most of the new technology won’t have an immediate impact on visuals or performance, but once developers start making games that support Nvidia features, you’ll notice a difference.

    Related: Everything you need to know about Intel Core i processors

    For example, there is a form of so-called asynchronous computing that GPU fans have been talking about for the last few years. This is something that AMD has successfully used in their latest generations of GPUs.

    Asynchronous computing allows the GPU to work on graphics and compute tasks at the same time, effectively improving performance by doing both tasks that need to be completed together, finishing sooner. Nvidia’s version is called «pre-emption», which is a little different, and instead of allowing tasks to run simultaneously, it allows the GPU to choose at a more granular level which tasks to prioritize.

    Nvidia says we won’t feel a difference with most modern games, but we’ll see a difference as the new DirectX 12 standard becomes more mainstream.

    See: Your Graphics Card Questions Answered — #AskTrusted

    There are also a number of optimizations for VR, including Lens Matched Shading, which respects any given VR headset and doesn’t render pixels that the user will never see, saving computing power. There is also simultaneous multi-projection, which allows the GPU to render the scene in 16 different viewpoints. This is useful for some of the details of Nvidia’s technology, including Single Pass Stereo, which allows the GPU to render a scene in 3D only once and then shift it slightly using one of the simultaneous multi-projection views it has already rendered.

    This method also helps when setting up multiple monitors when the external monitors are at an angle. Instead of a distorted screen image (because games assume all three monitors are in a straight line), developers can turn on the Perspective Ambient effect to make external monitors look less distorted.

    Unlike other sites, we thoroughly test every product we review. We use standard industry benchmarks to properly compare features. We will always tell you what we find. We never, ever accept money for a product review.
    Tell us what you think — send your letters to the editor.

    how much power video cards consume, power consumption table for video cards NVIDIA

    When choosing a video card, you need to pay attention to the amount of power consumed. Below is the power consumption table for TITAN and GeForce cards. Data taken from NVIDIA official sources. Electricity consumption is indicated in peak value and at maximum load.

    Video card model

    Power consumption, W

    Power supply, W

    GeForce RTX 3090

    350

    750

    GeForce RTX 3080

    320

    750

    GeForce RTX 3070

    220

    650

    GeForce RTX 3060 Ti

    200

    600

    NVIDIA TITAN RTX

    280

    650

    GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    260

    650

    GeForce RTX 2080 Super

    250

    650

    GeForce RTX 2080

    225

    650

    GeForce RTX 2070 Super

    215

    650

    GeForce RTX 2070

    175

    550

    GeForce RTX 2060 Super

    175

    550

    GeForce RTX 2060

    160

    500

    GeForce GTX 1660 Ti

    120

    450

    GeForce GTX 1660 Super

    125

    450

    GeForce GTX 1660

    120

    450

    GeForce GTX 1650 Super

    100

    350

    GeForce GTX 1650

    75

    300

    NVIDIA TITAN V

    250

    600

    NVIDIA TITAN Xp

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 1080

    180

    500

    GeForce GTX 1070 Ti

    180

    500

    GeForce GTX 1070

    150

    500

    GeForce GTX 1060

    120

    400

    GeForce GTX 1050 Ti

    75

    300

    GeForce GTX 1050

    75

    300

    GeForce GT 1030

    30

    300

    NVIDIA TITAN X (Pascal)

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX TITAN X

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX TITAN Black

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX TITAN

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 980 Ti

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 980

    165

    500

    GeForce GTX 970

    145

    500

    GeForce GTX 960

    120

    400

    GeForce GTX 950

    90

    350

    GeForce GTX 780 Ti

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 780

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 770

    230

    600

    GeForce GTX 760

    170

    500

    GeForce GTX 750 Ti

    60

    300

    GeForce GTX 750

    55

    300

    GeForce GTX 690

    300

    650

    GeForce GTX 680

    195

    550

    GeForce GTX 670

    170

    500

    GeForce GTX 660 Ti

    150

    450

    GeForce GTX 660

    140

    450

    GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost

    134

    450

    GeForce GTX 650 Ti

    110

    400

    GeForce GTX 650

    64

    400

    GeForce GTX 645

    130

    450

    GeForce GT 640 (GDDR5)

    49

    300

    GeForce GT 640 (DDR3)

    65

    350

    GeForce GT 630

    65

    300

    GeForce GT 620

    49

    300

    GeForce GTX 590

    365

    700

    GeForce GTX 580

    244

    600

    GeForce GTX 570

    219

    550

    GeForce GTX 560 Ti

    170

    500

    GeForce GTX 560

    150

    450

    GeForce GTX 550 Ti

    116

    400

    GeForce GT 520

    29

    300

    GeForce GTX 480

    250

    600

    GeForce GTX 470

    220

    550

    GeForce GTX 465

    200

    550

    GeForce GTX 460

    160

    450

    GeForce GTS 450

    106

    400

    As a rule, information about the technical characteristics of cards is accompanied by the following concepts:

    1. Thermal Design Parameter (TDP) — thermal design parameter, refers to the consumption of the video processor.
    2. GPU Power is the power consumption of the video processor.
    3. Total Board Power (TBP) is the total power consumption of the board.
    4. Total Graphics Power (TGP) — the total power consumption of the graphics accelerator, similar to TBP. TGP is always greater than TDP.
    5. Maximum Power Consumption (MPC) is the maximum power consumption.

    To power the processor and memory of the video card, step-down converters of the input DC voltage +12 volts are used. The cards also draw current on the +3.3 volt line through the riser. AMD and NVIDIA developers take different approaches to product development. This can be tracked by the difference in the VRM chain.

    Difference in measurement approaches power consumption of AMD and NVIDIA graphics cards

    Values ​​for NVIDIA graphics cards are entered into the BIOS. They define the default power consumption limit and the maximum power consumption. If the values ​​are equal, overclocking the cards will be quite difficult. In NVIDIA cards, a special chip measures the voltage at the input and output of a special shunt with different resistances. Measuring the voltage drop across the shunt allows you to find out the current consumed by the Nvidia card through the 12 volt line. Since the main consumption of green video cards is carried out precisely along this line, the accuracy of information regarding the total electricity consumption is accurate.

    The maximum power consumption of NVIDIA cards almost never exceeds the values ​​specified in the BIOS. This is achieved by controlling the consumption on the 12 volt line and quickly changing the operating mode of the VRM PWM controller.

    The total power consumption of an NVIDIA video card includes not only the power consumed by the processor and video memory, but also the RGB backlight and cooling fans. The overclocking potential of the cards will increase significantly if you turn off the backlight and install more efficient fans of the same power.

    AMD video card controller supplies power to the GPU. The consumption of other components when calculating TBP / TGP for AMD video cards is usually not taken into account. For this reason, AMD graphics cards usually consume more power at the same values.

    DC voltage losses

    The efficiency of video card circuits is much lower than that of switching power supplies. This is due to the limitations associated with the size of parts on the boards, as well as the losses associated with coordinating the operation of multiple phases. Among the main components that reduce efficiency are filtering and voltage smoothing. When choosing video cards, we recommend paying attention to the number of power phases of the video processor. The more their number, the less the output voltage ripple.

    Parallel smoothing capacitors can be added to each phase to improve the quality of the output voltage. Increasing the capacitance of the smoothing capacitor by a factor of two reduces the amplitude of ripples at the output of the converter by almost half. This has a beneficial effect on the stability of the GPU and its overclocking potential.

    Miniaturization of components worsens their cooling conditions. This negatively affects the overall efficiency of the power circuits. NVIDIA manufacturers have abandoned the use of virtual power phases in devices.

    DCR (Direct Current Resistance) smart controllers are used to improve power phase balancing for NVIDIA cards. In real time, they adjust the operation of the phases depending on the temperature and the passing current.

    Phase balancing of Nvidia cards is achieved by constantly monitoring and adjusting the gate current of the FETs of each phase. Measurements are not made by current tracking at the shunt or at the output of the smoothing filter, but by DCR circuits.

    Most low-end and mid-priced AMD graphics cards use circuits connected to LC filter inductors for phase balancing. They differ for the worse in the presence of large errors. Expensive AMD graphics cards use more sophisticated ways to control and balance the operation of the phases.

    Video card memory power controllers

    The memory controller resides on the GPU chip and generates heat that must be included in the TDP calculation. However, neither AMD nor NVIDIA counts it in their total consumption. In Nvidia video cards, memory is powered through the MVDD and storage controller phases. In AMD Radeon VII video cards, the memory is powered through the VDDRC HBM and VDDCI circuits, in Vega — through the MVDD and VDDCI lines. The main current in the memory supply circuits comes from the MVDD (VDDRC) line. The VDDCI voltage is used on the I/O bus between the GPU Core and the memory chips.

    How can I find out the current power consumption of video cards ?

    As a rule, the manufacturer’s official website indicates the recommended power supply capacity with which the video adapter will work well.