Hdmi 1.4 hdr: Error 429 (Too Many Requests)

Is it necessary to change your HDMI cables to enjoy 4K Ultra HD & HDR picture? (2021)

Mis à jour le 23 July 2021.

You have just purchased a 4K Ultra HD HDR projector, an OLED or QLED4K Ultra HD TV, as well as a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray player with HDMI 2.0 ports and you don’t want to wait to enjoy the richness of 4K Ultra HD pictures in HDR, HDR10+ and Dolby Vision. 

Are your HDMI cables capable of transferring all the data required for this level of image quality at a sufficient bitrate? Do they meet the requirements of these devices?

The NorStone Jura HDMI cable is compatible with 4K Ultra HD video streams (24, 25 and 30 fps) as well as 7.1 and Dolby Atmos audio tracks.This diagram provides an indication of the maximum data rate that HDMI 1.4, HDMI 2.0 and HDMI 2.1 standards allow.

Since the creation of the HDMI interface, HDMI standards (such as the HDMI 2.0 standard and the very recent HDMI 2.1 standard) are used to differentiate the abilities of HDMI controllers, which are the interfaces that send and receive digital data streams at the input and output of different devices.

When the resolution of an image is increased, the amount of detail is increased, but so is the image’s weight. Consequently, it is necessary to use an HDMI cable capable of transferring data at a higher bitrate in order to stream the image.

  • HDMI 1.4 standard: 4K Ultra HD compatible (3840 x 2160 pixels) at 24, 25 and 30 fps, and 3D compatible. Maximum bitrate of 10.2 Gbps.
  • HDMI 2.0 standard: 4K Ultra HD compatible (3840 x 2160 pixels) at 24, 25, 30 and 60 fps, HDR compatible (HDR10, HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision). Extended color spaces such as BT.2020 are supported, along with chroma subsampling up to 4:4:4. Maximum bitrate of 18 Gbps.

Therefore, HDMI 1.4, HDMI 2.0 and HDMI 2.1 standards only apply to the connectors on LED TVs and both OLED and QLED4K Ultra HD TVs, projectors and 4K Ultra HD projectors, 4K UHD A/V receivers, Blu-ray players and 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players as well as other 4K Ultra HD compatible sources or streamers. They don’t apply to HDMI cables, even though the marketing claim “HDMI 2.0 compatible” is frequently added to their packaging. 

This is another norm issued by the HDMI Forum that classifies HDMI cables according to the maximum data rate they allow, and therefore the maximum image quality they can transfer. 

There are four categories of HDMI cables:

  • Standard HDMI cables are compatible with 720p and 1080i resolutions used to transfer TNT HD programs.
  • High Speed HDMI cables are compatible with HD 1080p and 4K UHD (3840 x 2160 pixels at 24, 25 and 30 fps) resolutions, 3D and Deep Color.
  • Premium High Speed HDMI cables are compatible with HD 1080p and 4K UHD resolutions up to the maximum bitrate (60 fps as well as 24, 25 and 30 fps). They also ensure compatibility with HDR video content (HDR10, HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision), extended color spaces such as BT.2020 and chroma subsampling up to 4:4:4.
  • Ultra High Speed HDMI cables conform to the requirements of the HDMI 2. 1 standard and ensure the transmission of video streams in 4K UHD (3840 x 2160 pixels), 8K60 UHD (7680 x 4320 pixels at 60 fps) and 4K120 (120 fps) non-compressed resolutions with HDR, as well as the 10K120 compressed resolution, with a certified bandwidth of 48 Gbps. All HDR standards are supported, along with extended color spaces such as BT.2020 and chroma subsampling up to 4:4:4.

All you need is a High Speed HDMI cable (10.2 Gbps bitrate) to enjoy the current 4K Ultra HD content (3840 x 2160 pixels at 24, 25 and 30 fps) found on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray discs, provided that each link connected by this cable has controllers that meet the HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 2.0 standard. 

However, the length of the HDMI cable is important to take into account. From 5 to 8 meters, a decrease in bandwidth can be noticed, generating artefacts and/or signal loss. For lengths over 10 meters, it is highly recommended to use an optical HDMI cable like the NorStone Jura HDMI-Optic or an HDMI signal repeater/amplifier such as the NorStone HDMI Repeater 3D.

The NorStone Jura HDMI-Optic cable is particularly recommended for greater lengths.

HDMI cables recommended for 4K content (24, 25, and 30 fps, without HDR): 

  • NorStone Arran HDMI
  • Atlas Element HDMI 18G
  • Audioquest Forest 48 HDMI

A Premium High Speed HDMI cable (18 Gbps bandwidth) is highly recommended to ensure optimal transmission of 4K Ultra HD content in HDR (HDR10, HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision) with devices featuring controllers that conform to the HDMI 2.0 standard or higher (to support different HDR formats).

HDMI cables recommended for 4K content (24, 25, 30 and 60 fps with HDR):

  • NorStone Jura HDMI
  • QED Reference HDMI-E HS
  • Kordz PRS3

To fully enjoy the richness of HDR10, HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision images, it is recommended to use Premium High Speed HDMI cables, compatible with a bandwidth of 18 Gbps.

HDMI cables recommended for 8K and 4K content (24, 25, 30, 60 and 120 fps with HDR):

  • Audioquest Cinnamon 48 HDMI 
  • Kordz Bravo 
  • Inakustik Profil HDMI 8K Optical

A 48 Gbps HDMI cable is highly recommended to ensure optimal transmission of Ultra HD 8K and 4K 120 fps HDR content (HDR10, HDR10+, HLG, and Dolby Vision), with devices equipped with controllers that are HDMI 2. 1 or higher (for compatibility with the various HDR formats and 120 fps)

Even if brands such as Audioquest, QED, NorStone and Real Cable do not disclose any information about compatibility with the HDMI 2.0 and HDMI 2.1 standards, they have all been providing High Speed HDMI cables entirely compatible with the 4K Ultra High Definition images on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray discs (3840 x 2160 pixels at 24, 25, and 30 fps) for many years.

If you own a High Speed HDMI cable, you may use it to connect a 4K Blu-ray player or a 4K Ultra HD network media player to an OLED or QLED 4K UHD TV or a 4K projector and enjoy an excellent picture quality.

If this isn’t the case and you wish to purchase a premium cable for your brand-new equipment, take a look at the HDMI Cable section on Son-Vidéo.com.

Do you need new HDMI cables for HDR?

The latest TV technology is high dynamic range, or HDR. If you want to take advantage of this latest and greatest, you need an HDR TV (of course), an HDR-capable source (either a streaming app on your TV or a media streamer/UHD BD player) and HDR video to watch.

But do you need new HDMI cables? Surely those many-years-old, dust-covered, ultracheap cables you bought at Dollar World can’t handle this new TV technology?

Well, amazingly enough, they probably can, unless they’re really long. That’s because there’s no such thing as an HDR HDMI cable. Here’s why.

Dumb pipe

HDMI cables are just a dumb pipe. They don’t care (to an extent) what you send through them. There is no such thing as an «HDR HDMI» cable or an «HDMI 2.0» cable. That second one is important. HDMI cables don’t have version numbers. The connections have version numbers. So your TV might be «HDMI 2.0a» (and indeed needs to be for HDR), but the cable you plug into it doesn’t have a number. It’s just an HDMI cable.

There are four basic types of HDMI cables in the home:

  • High Speed with Ethernet
  • Standard Speed with Ethernet
  • High Speed without Ethernet
  • Standard Speed without Ethernet

Nearly every HDMI cable you’re likely to buy is the best one: High Speed with Ethernet. And they’re cheap: about $6 for a 6-foot version on Amazon, for example.

There’s no reason to buy a Standard Speed cable. Any true High Speed cable bought from 2010 onward will also do the same thing as a Standard Speed one (a cable older than 2009, though, is less likely to work).

There are some exceptions, which we’ll get to in a moment. The main takeaway again is, there’s no such thing as an HDR-capable HDMI cable. If the cable is a true High Speed HDMI cable, it can handle HDR. There’s nothing special about the new technology, it’s just additional data. Think of it as a little extra water down the pipe. As long as the water can fit in the pipe, the pipe doesn’t care what’s in it.

Oh, and if it doesn’t have Ethernet, that’s OK. Nothing uses HDMI Ethernet anyway, and probably nothing ever will.

Update 1/2017: There’s been an update to the HDMI spec. The new version is called HDMI 2.1 and it adds several new features including a new cable type. You don’t need the new cables or HDMI 2. 1 (right now), but it’s worth checking out so you’ve got all the latest info.

What you DO need

Every step in your AV chain (the expensive devices into which you plug the cables) generally must be HDMI 2.0a for HDR to work. As in, your TV, receiver and source all have to be HDMI 2.0a, and usually require HDCP 2.2 copy protection too. If your TV is HDR, it almost certainly has at least one HDMI input with 2.0a/2.2. If your receiver/sound bar is a few years old, it almost certainly does not.

So if you connect a UHD BD player to a 3-year-old receiver that only has HDMI 1.4, it won’t matter that your TV is HDMI 2.0a/2.2. The HDR data gets «blocked» at the receiver (or technically, didn’t get sent by the player once it saw the receiver was HDMI 1.4).

In this case you might need to upgrade your receiver, or connect your HDR source directly to your TV and send the audio separately to the receiver. That’s why some devices, like the Samsung UBD-K8500 4K Blu-ray player, have two HDMI outputs: one «main» for both video and audio, and a second one for «audio only. «

Amazon/Monoprice

Exceptions for length

You maybe have noticed a few weasel words when I talked about your cables working with HDR. In theory your High Speed cable should work just fine. That’s the beauty of HDMI, it’s a dumb pipe, sending whatever you want over it.

However, despite labeling saying they’re High Speed, not all High Speed cables were actually made to handle the maximum amount of High Speed data as specified by HDMI Licensing. Metaphorically speaking, it’s like they specified High Speed cables had to be a 1-inch pipe but some companies actually made a 7-/8-inch pipe. This was no big deal when all anyone was sending was 1/2 inch of water. Now that you want the full bandwidth of that pipe, things could be a mess. Not a guarantee, but a possibility.

If the cable’s only a meter long, it’s probably fine. Even many longer cables will be fine. Long, inexpensive cables at the CNET lab and those used by several of our colleagues all work fine. The longer the cable, though, the more likely you are to have a problem. And, frustratingly, it largely depends on your gear. A 10-meter cable might work perfectly with TV A and Source B, but might not work at all with TV B and Source C.

In CNET’s lab we’ve found that long cables (15 feet or longer) in combination with certain devices might fail with the highest-bandwidth 4K HDR signals. This is really the first time we’ve seen this issue, and we’ve seen it happen even with expensive «active» at very long lengths. They’ll work with some devices but not with others.

The good news is…

It works, or it doesn’t

If it works, it works. There’s no «partial HDR» or «blurry 4K.» HDMI is all or nothing. If you are getting 4K HDR, different cables won’t make it look better. That’s not how HDMI works.

If you’re not getting 4K HDR, check all your settings. That’s the most likely culprit. That said, it’s possible for the cable to work fine with 1080p, and not give you a signal with 4K (giving you a black or flickering screen). It’s possible for you to set 4K on all your gear, have it try to work and then default back to 1080p.

Annoyingly, there’s no way to tell if your current cables will work with HDR just by looking at them. You’ll have to try them and see. Assuming your TV is capable of showing HDR (check the manual), if the settings are correct on your source and you’re watching HDR video, your TV should give you some indication that it’s displaying HDR.

What to do

If you’ve double-checked all your settings and it’s still not working, or you get an image but it cuts out, then you might need a new cable. You don’t, however, need to spend copious amounts of money. Most likely a new cheap cable will work just fine.

If you just want to buy one cable that’s sure to work, look for Premium Certified cables. These will be a little more expensive, but they’re certified to work with 4K HDR content. This doesn’t mean that others won’t work, or even that the Certified versions will for sure. If you’re buying a long cable and paying a lot for it, it’s safest (as always) to get it from a place with a money-back return policy.

Many certified cables aren’t that much more expensive. For example, Monoprice’s 6-foot non-certified cable is around $2.67. Its certified cable is $4.50, so you’re not going to need a second mortgage. For 15 feet, which is less likely to be able to handle 4K HDR, the prices are $5.79 and $9.99 respectively.

But for most people, your current cables will work just fine even with the highest-bandwidth 4K HDR signals.


Got a question for Geoff? First, check out all the other articles he’s written on topics such as why all HDMI cables are the same, LED LCD vs. OLED, why 4K TVs aren’t worth it and more. Still have a question? Tweet at him @TechWriterGeoff then check out his travel photography on Instagram. He also thinks you should check out his sci-fi novel and its sequel.

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: What’s the difference?

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: The basics

HDMI 2.0 was announced as a standard in late 2013. It got a lot of people confused, wondering if they suddenly needed to throw away their TVs in order to get on this latest tech trend.

As far as tech advancements go, HDMI 2.0 is a pretty friendly one. It’s as much a standard of software as hardware, and cables designed for HDMI 1.4 systems will work just fine with new HDMI 2.0 devices.

What you need to make sure is that both ends of your entertainment chain – your TV and Blu-ray player, for example – support the standard. It’ll mean they’re geared up for the new standards we’ll dig into shortly. Some previously HDMI 1.4 hardware needs nothing more than a firmware update.

HDMI 2.0 is a reimagining of the interchange between your bits of home entertainment gear, one that factors in the immense amount of data required to get high-quality audio and video to something like a 4K 3D-capable TV.

HDMI 2.0 itself isn’t really about resolution, though, but bandwidth. More bandwidth is what makes all of its new standards possible. HDMI 2.0 systems can transfer data at up to 18Gbps, up from 10.2Gbps in HDMI 1.4.

In terms we’re all more likely to get on with, 18Gbps is 2,250MB a second. For a little more context, normal Blu-rays max out at 54Mbps, or 6.75MB per second. The HDMI pipe is wider than a dual carriageway.

Here are the kinds of goodies that pipe can deliver.

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: 4K video at 50p and 60p

HDMI 1.4 introduced the kind of bandwidth required to deliver 4K video, but HDMI 2.0 can dole out 4K video without compromise, at 50 and 60 frames per second. In HDMI 1.4, the rate of 4K was limited to 24 frames per second.

24p and 30p are perfect for watching films, but there are times when the extra speed of 50p and 60p come in handy. Gaming could make great use of 60p content, while more films are being shot at higher frame rates, giving quite a different look from that of slow old traditional cinema.

The most famous of the lot is Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit, which was shot in 48 frames per second. We weren’t too keen on the look of 48p, which gave the film the look of a low-rent soap opera, but apparently it’s the future.

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: Enough bandwidth for 10-bit and 12-bit colour at 4K

Just as important as the higher frame rates for Ultra HD/4K HDMI 2.0 enables, the extra bandwidth also means HDMI is able to transport 4K video at 10-bit and 12-bit colour depths. With HDMI 1.4 it was limited to 8-bit.

What’s the difference between 8-bit, 10-bit and 12-bit colour? It tells you how much information goes into each pixel’s colour. 8-bit colour results in a colour palette of 16.7-million colours – it’s a figure you may have heard floating about if you’ve ever read into buying a screen of some kind.

As 12-bit colour ramps-up the specificity of the colour information that goes into rendering an image, the total number of possible colours is 68.7 billion. That exponential ramping-up of data is what makes transporting 4K 12-bit such a data-heavy task.

These higher colour bit rates are often labelled “deep color”, so if you see that term you now know what it refers to.

It’s this ability that unlocks High Dynamic Range, which gives you video information required to more and brighter colours.

Related: HDR TV Explained

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: Dual video streams to the same screen

Here’s a neat one: HDMI 2.0 supports the delivery of two different video streams, which can be delivered to the same screen. Exactly what will happen to those streams will depend on what the box (perhaps a TV) at the end does with them.

This improvement is really a pure bandwidth issue. 18Gbps gives a comfortable pipe for two high bit-rate 1080p streams with audio.

It sounds like a gimmick, but this adds a hardware standard for something we’ve seen in proprietary form before now. With a 3D TV, it opens up ‘dual view’ TV watching, where you’d use a pair of 3D glasses to deliver two completely difference streams to two people watching the same TV.

Two people could be watching different TV channels, or one could be gaming while the other watches TV. Anti-social? Sure, but the other person would probably just end up playing on their phone if forced to watch the same thing as you anyway. Samsung showed off this exact kind of scenario in action at CES 2014. We’d love to see this adopted more widely, especially as the resolution split in a 4K TV would be much less apparent than in a 1080p one.

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: Up to 32, 1536KHz audio channels, and Dolby Atmos

HDMI 2.0 makes huge updates to the often-neglected side of AV – audio. From being able to transmit just eight channels, you can now send 32.

This is what has enabled the Dolby Atmos standard to be moved over to home cinema receivers. It was once the preserve of just a few super high-end cinema sound systems, but you can now get it in your home.

Dolby Atmos is all about giving your much more accurate positional audio, making sound appear 3D for a more immersive cinema experience.

Does Dolby Atmos mean littering your lounge with dozens of speakers then, like an Atmos cinema? Thankfully not. Instead, Atmos receivers make use of the much more nuanced channel information provided by HDMI 2.0 and an Atmos mix, and then play with it to provide better spatial audio with a relatively conventional 5.1-7.2 style speaker setup (with additional height channels).

The quality of the audio streams has been improved too. Sample rates now go up to 1536KHz. In a full 32-channel system that means you’d get 48KHz per channel. That’s decent if not the sort of sample rate that get audio nerds drooling. 24-bit, 192KHz is where it’s at for that crowd. Of course, those sort of frequencies are perfectly possible with HDMI 2.0, just not if you want 32 channels of audio.

HDMI 2.0 vs 1.4: Control all your gadgets through HDMI

One of the lesser talked-about features of HDMI is its re-working of CEC, sometimes referred to as CEC 2.0. This stands for Consumer Electronics Control, and lets one device send remote control-style signals to another over HDMI.

It’s effectively a stand-in for a proper universal remote control system – something that would be handy but is yet to turn up. With HDMI 2.0 you can – in theory – control up to 15 devices with the one remote. It was around in HDMI 1.4 but now it’s better.

Only needing one remote control and not having to splash the cash on one of those expensive Universal ones? Yes please. Opting for CEC is also more attractive – in one sense – than using a phone’s IR transmitter as a universal remote (a feature of higher-end phones) as there’s no lengthy setup involved.

However, for it to really take off, the manufacturers of the boxes we’re going to control with CEC need to embrace the standard, and help people know it exists. Or we’ll never get anywhere with it.

Understand HDMI 2.1 and HDMI 2.0 and relationship of bandwidth and 4K resolution

Most certainly, and that applies whether you’re on a monitor, projector, portable projector, or your trusty TV. While up until HDMI 1. 3 the saying “all HDMI cables are made equal” was more or less correct, since HDMI 1.4 and the advent of 4K the various data bandwidth of each cable makes a huge difference.

To place things in perspective, HDMI 1.3 can pass 10.2Gbps (gigabits per second) and doesn’t support 4K at all. That version of HDMI is now retro, being a product of the 2000s and the 1080p era. HDMI 1.4 has the same bandwidth of 10.2Gbps. It was designed as a quick fix update to HDMI 1.3, with support for 4K in 30Hz and no HDR. Then a massive step up arrived with HDMI 2.0, which nearly doubled bandwidth to 18Gbps. That allows for 4K 60Hz (or 60 frames per second) plus HDR metadata. It’s why HDMI 2.0 was so effective in popularizing 4K HDR video and importantly 4K HDR gaming. While 4K 30Hz may be OK for some game genres, 4K 60Hz offers good performance even in the most reflex-based titles.

More recently, along came HDMI 2.1, the biggest development in HDMI history. This monster more than doubles bandwidth, going up to 48Gbps. HDMI 2.1 supports 4K 120Hz and 8K 60Hz, so it’s very future proof. The bandwidth overhead is even enough for features like auto low latency mode and variable refresh rates, two features aimed squarely at high end gaming. HDMI 2.1 further supports the next generation of HDR, known as dynamic HDR. As you may guess, dynamic HDR adjusts image parameters on the fly rather than outputting a fixed HDR profile. Amazingly, HDMI 2.1 even supports 10K resolution in 24Hz for cinematic and television content.

So yes, HDMI bandwidth definitely makes a difference. The days of buying just any cable are long behind us. 

How Can I Tell If My HDMI Cable Is Working?

In the past, because HDMI works as a digital connector, common wisdom said you’d either get a signal or no signal, and that was the way to tell. While this still holds true for extreme situations (such as a completely faulty cable), it doesn’t work when trying to test an HDMI cable’s bandwidth nuances.

Since HDMI cables and versions are all backwards compatible, a poorly made HDMI 2. 0 cable that can only handle 15Gbps instead of 18Gbps will still seemingly work just fine. However, it won’t be able to display a full 4K 60Hz HDR image. You need to be slightly vigilant and look for warning signs of insufficient bandwidth.

The most obvious are artifacts. If parts of the screen flicker or the whole screen goes green (or some other color) for a split second, then you’re looking at a bandwidth bottleneck. If possible, go into the settings for your devices and change things around. The easiest would be chroma sampling. A good HDMI 2.0 cable can do 4K 60Hz HDR in 4:2:2. If you force it to pass 4:4:4 content, you may run into the artifacts we mentioned above.

By the same token, if your HDMI 2.0 cable shows artifacts when running content in 4:2:2 but no artifacts if you change your settings to 4:2:0, then you know it’s not really capable of that 18Gbps bandwidth. 

What Are Some of the Other Signs of Insufficient Bandwidth?

In addition to split second coloration of the screen, you may get something that looks like snow or sparkles. All of these simply mean there isn’t enough room for the data the cable is trying to pass, and the missing space is rendered as “junk” rather than actual image content.

Flashes and sparkles happen when your source devices (console, streaming box, streaming app, PC, etc.), cable, and display (monitor, projector, TV) fail to negotiate a stable connection. HDMI is a smart, active connection standard. That means the components it links and the cable talk to each other all the time. If their processing elements are sophisticated enough, they may automatically adjust image quality to prevent artifacts. You’ll be able to tell this by going into settings or bringing up image data info. If your HDMI cable isn’t good enough, you’ll realize what you’re looking at isn’t HDR after all because the HDR data will be disabled or greyed out. Or it’ll say 4:2:0, whereas you were expecting 4:2:2.

Some devices, like Apple TV, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4, have HDMI cable testing and provide pretty detailed information regarding what the cable supports. Make use of those features! 

So How Do I Choose a Good HDMI Cable?

Tricky question, to be honest. Of course try to stick with known brands or brands that you’ve had good experiences with. Buy from reputable retailers and check the specs of the cable in question. Contrary to modern cynicism, cable manufacturers rarely lie about specs as it’s not worth the risk. If a cable says HDMI 2.0 premium then there’s a 99% chance it’ll support the full 18Gbps bandwidth.

Ultimately, you’ll need to keep an eye out for how the cable performs. That’s the only tried and true test. Drastic quality issues will manifest right away, as will flash and sparkle artifacts. It’s important not to get paranoid: unlike what you may sometimes hear, HDMI cables DO NOT cause screen tearing, ghosting, or horrible input lag. They may conceivably contribute to these problems, but not cause them as that’s the realm of your source and display devices.

We hope this has helped you feel better about your HDMI cables! 

{{title}}

We will notify you when the product becomes available.

Name

Email
*

Required.
Invalid email format.

Required.

We will send you an email once the product becomes available.

Sorry, our store is currently down for maintenance.We should be back shortly. Thank you for your patience!

HDMI Cables 1.4 vs 2.0 vs 2.1 | United States

A new HDMI standard is out, and that means faster ports and cables for your home entertainment devices. Here are the details.

By Will Greenwald

The HDMI Forum released the HDMI 2.1 standard for video cables and connections in November, and that means upgrades are on the horizon. The current wave of TVs, game systems, and media streamers will remain untouched for most of the coming year, but thanks to the HDMI Forum’s press conference on HDMI 2.1 at CES 2018, we have an idea of what the new standard will bring. Before you scramble for new cables, here’s what you should know.

Faster, Better 4K

The HDMI 2.1 standard is faster than HDMI 2.0, the current connection used by modern home entertainment devices. It nearly triples the bandwidth of HDMI 2.0, defining a maximum speed of 48Gbps, compared with 18GBps. For 4K TVs, that means an HDMI 2.1 connection can handle 4K video at up to 120 frames per second. That’s natively transmitted video, not the motion-processed, interpolated 24fps, 30fps, and 60fps video that current TVs with 120Hz refresh rates can display. It means smoother action that looks much less artificial.

These faster speeds mean wider support for dynamic high-dynamic-range(HDR) video. Yes, that’s two dynamics in one term, but there’s a reason. HDR expands the dynamic range of video, which determines how dark, bright, and colorful each pixel can get. Most current HDR content is static, defining a set range with HDR10 or adjusting levels based on individual TVs with profile metadata. These levels stay constant through the movie or show you’re watching.

Dynamic HDR makes the dynamic range variable instead of static. Additional metadata for each scene or frame tweaks the dynamic range of the picture to best fit the content. These adjustments let dark scenes show more shadow detail and bright scenes show more highlight detail by giving the video more flexibility and control within the light and color ranges of each scene.

HDR10+ is the most prominent dynamic HDR standard, first pushed by Amazon and Samsung and getting increased adoption from other manufacturers and studios. HDR10+ is currently possible through HDMI 2.0 connections and is available on Samsung’s 2017 and 2018 flagship TVs, but the increased bandwidth of HDMI 2.1 ensures future compatibility for any further dynamic HDR standards or expanded HDR10+ content.

8K Enabled

HDMI 2.0 was the real step that enabled 4K video to gain momentum. HDMI 1.4 supported 4K resolution at up to 30 frames per second, but HDMI 2. 0’s 4K60 compatibility set the standard for watching 4K content on a 4K TV. HDMI 2.1 skips the 30fps step for 8K (7,680 by 4,320) and jumps straight to enabling the new, much higher resolution at 60fps. Technically, the standard supports up to 10K resolution in terms of sheer bandwidth, but 10K hasn’t actually been defined beyond approximately 10,000 horizontal pixels. On paper, 8K120 and 10K120 are also possible through HDMI 2.1, but they present entirely new questions about media format and transmission outside of cable speed.

You don’t have to rush out and buy an 8K TV just yet, though. Your 4K screen will remain valid and eye-catching for several years (though if you still have a 1080p HDTV, you should consider upgrading). According to the HDMI Forum, only 400,000 8K TVs are expected to ship worldwide in 2018, and they’ll be released almost entirely in China. That number will move up to 900,000 in 2020, with approximately half spread across Europe and North America and the rest in China. That’s not a lot of 8K TVs for the next three years.

8K is still a fledgling technology on the consumer side, with no significant media distribution or TV manufacturing presence yet. It will be several years before 8K TVs become the new high-end, flagship standard, and at least a year or two after that before prices reach a level reasonable for normal consumers.

New Cables and Devices

TVs, media streamers, and game consoles will need to be built with HDMI 2.1 in order to use it, rather than receive a firmware upgrade to enable it, since the much higher bandwidth needs faster hardware connections to support it. This means HDMI 2.1 won’t be found on your current devices at any point; it’s strictly a new standard for new hardware to be released from 2018 onward.

HDMI 2.1 will require new HDMI cables, which will be labeled Ultra High Speed HDMI Cables. They’ll look and function similarly to older HDMI cables and use HDMI A, C, and D connectors (standard HDMI, mini HDMI, and micro HDMI respectively). Like HDMI 2.0 and HDMI 1.4, cables will be backward-compatible to a point, so HDMI 2.1 devices will work just fine with HDMI 2.0 cables for showing 4K60 content.

When Will It Matter?

HDMI 2.1 devices and cables won’t even be an option for most of this year, and widespread consumer adoption won’t get rolling until 2019. In fact, the HDMI Forum won’t finish publishing its HDMI 2.1 compliance testing specification, which is required to certify HDMI 2.1 products, until Q3 of 2018.

More important, that backward compatibility means your TV, Blu-ray player, and other devices won’t suddenly stop working when everything else has HDMI 2.1. The HDMI 2.0 devices you’ve bought in the last few years will still handle up to 4K60 video, and even when you get something new with HDMI 2.1, it’ll work just fine with everything else in your home theater. It just won’t support 8K60.

Read more: “Imaging Chips, 8K Top 2018’s Popular TV Technologies”

Originally published at www. pcmag.com.

HDMI vs DisplayPort: Which is the best?

  1. Table of Contents
  2. Top
  3. Supported Technologies

    1. Supported Resolutions
    2. MST
    3. VRR
    4. USB-C Alt-Mode
    5. Other Technologies
  4. Physical Differences

    1. Maximum Length
  5. Compatibility
  6. Conclusion
  7. Discussions

Updated Mar 15, 2021 at 11:28 am

By Adriana Wiszniewska

HDMI and DisplayPort are two of the most commonly used connectors on displays and media devices. From computers and gaming consoles to the smallest monitors and the largest TVs, chances are you have something that supports at least one of these connectors. When it comes to monitors, most of them come with at least one HDMI and DisplayPort connection, and most computers support both. But what is the difference between the two, and how do you decide which one to use?

Test results

Supported Technologies

HDMI and DisplayPort were designed for different uses, so they support different technologies. Each has its own advantages depending on how you plan to use it.

Supported Resolutions

The maximum resolution and refresh rate available depends on the specific versions of DisplayPort and HDMI available to you. Most monitors on the market today support either DisplayPort 1.2 or 1.4 and/or HDMI 1.4 or 2.0. While the exact specifications vary depending on a few other factors, below is a list of the approximate maximum formats each connector can support.

  HDMI 1.4 HDMI 2.0 HDMI 2.1 DP 1.2 DP 1.3 DP 1.4 DP 2.0
1080p @ 120Hz
1440p @ 30Hz
1440p @ 60Hz
1440p @ 120Hz
4k @ 30Hz
4k @ 60Hz
4k @ 120Hz
8k @ 30Hz
8k @ 60Hz
8k @ 120Hz
HDR

HDMI is technically superior thanks to the release of HDMI 2. 1, which surpasses the capabilities of DisplayPort 1.4, but monitors that support it are scarce. Expect that to change soon, though, as a number of manufacturers announced HDMI 2.1 monitors at CES 2021. Compared to standard HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.4 is superior. DisplayPort 2.0 has also been announced, and it has an even higher maximum bandwidth than HDMI 2.1 at nearly triple the bandwidth of DisplayPort 1.4. This would theoretically make it possible to achieve resolutions of up to 16k with compression or lower resolutions with much higher refresh rates than is currently possible. As of writing, though, there’s no hardware that supports DisplayPort 2.0, and due to global delays, we likely won’t see any until late 2021 at least.

Winner: HDMI, for now

Multi-Stream Transport (MST)

First introduced with DisplayPort 1.2, Multi-Stream Transport, or MST, allows you to connect multiple displays to a single DisplayPort connection on your computer. Although the total bandwidth can’t exceed the maximum bandwidth of the port you’re using, in theory, this technology allows you to run up to 63 separate displays on a single port. This device chaining can be done either from one display to another, a technique known as ‘daisy-chaining’, or through an external hub.

HDMI doesn’t natively support MST, but it’s possible to achieve similar results using DisplayPort to HDMI hubs. This still requires a DisplayPort connection on the source device.

Winner: DisplayPort

Variable Refresh Rate (VRR)

AMD FreeSync

FreeSync Monitor (Gigabyte M27Q)

NVIDIA G-SYNC

 G-SYNC Monitor (Dell Alienware AW2721D)

HDMI

  • Supports only FreeSync

DisplayPort

  • Supports G-SYNC and FreeSync

With two different mainstream VRR technologies on the market, it’s important that your choice of connector match your needs. If you’re looking to connect a PC with an AMD graphics card, or an Xbox, you’ll be looking for a display that supports FreeSync. FreeSync is supported on both HDMI and DisplayPort, so you don’t really have to worry about it. G-SYNC, NVIDIA’s VRR technology, is only supported over DisplayPort at the moment, so if you have an NVIDIA graphics card, a DisplayPort connection is best. For options, see our recommendations for the best FreeSync monitors and the best G-SYNC monitors.

Winner: DisplayPort

Learn more about the difference between FreeSync and G-SYNC.

USB-C Alt-Mode

Mainly supported on compact 2-in-1 PCs and some phones, USB-C Alt-Mode can send a video signal over a USB-C port. DisplayPort has supported this capability since 2014 and depending on the bandwidth required for the display, it also allows USB data to be sent over the same cable, so if your monitor has built-in USB ports, you can drive the display and the USB ports with a single cable. This also allows for USB Power Delivery mode, powering your computer with a single cable. HDMI also supports USB-C Alt-Mode, but requires a more complex cable, as the signal must be converted from DisplayPort to HDMI.

Winner: DisplayPort

Other Technologies

This is just a summary of the major technologies supported by both DisplayPort and HDMI. HDMI also supports other technologies, including ARC and eARC, and Ethernet-Over-HDMI. With very few exceptions, these technologies are mainly designed with TVs in mind, and they aren’t supported on the vast majority of monitors, so they’re beyond the scope of this article.

Physical Differences

HDMI Connector

DisplayPort Connector

HDMI

  • 19-Pin Connector
  • Friction Latch

DisplayPort

  • 20-Pin Connector
  • Mechanical Latch on most

HDMI and DisplayPort are physically very similar. HDMI uses a 19-pin cable, while DisplayPort has 20 pins. Both connectors look alike, but most DisplayPort cables have a physical latch that prevents them from being disconnected accidentally. Although not officially part of the DisplayPort standard, the majority of DisplayPort cables have a latching mechanism. On the other hand, very few HDMI cables have latches.

Winner: Draw

Maximum Length

HDMI

  • 100′ for 1080p signals
  • 30′ for 4k signals
  • Active cables can be used for longer runs
  • Supports other cable types, including HDBaseT, for runs over 300′

DisplayPort

  • Officially: 10′
  • Longer cables exist, but maximum resolution may decrease
  • Expensive extenders required for longer runs

Standard HDMI cables are available in lengths exceeding 100′ for 1080p signals, or 30′ for 4k signals. Using active cables, or other transmission methods, like HDMI over HDBaseT, makes it possible to run HDMI cables for over 300′. DisplayPort, on the other hand, has a maximum length of about 10′ according to the official standard. Longer cables exist, but the maximum resolution and refresh rate may decrease with longer cables.

Winner: HDMI

Compatibility

Originally designed for HD TVs, HDMI is now supported by almost any home audio/video device, including computers, home theater systems, game consoles, etc. HDMI is also supported by the vast majority of displays currently on the market, from small portable displays to the largest 8k TVs.

DisplayPort was designed for computer use as a replacement for DVI and VGA connectors. There are no consumer TVs that support DisplayPort at this time, and we don’t know if there ever will be. None of the major game consoles support DisplayPort, nor do most cable/satellite boxes or streaming devices.

  HDMI DisplayPort
TVs Yes No
Projectors Yes No
Monitors Yes Yes
Computers Yes Yes
Game Consoles Yes No
Blu-ray Players Yes No
Streaming Devices Yes No
Cable Boxes Yes No

Winner: HDMI

Conclusion

DisplayPort and HDMI cables deliver very similar performance, but they each have their advantages and disadvantages. HDMI is supported on more devices, but DisplayPort, which was designed for computers, has a few technical advantages. Overall, if you’re looking to connect your computer to a new monitor, use DisplayPort if it’s an option. If not, HDMI is an almost equally good choice. If your monitor has a limited number of inputs, using DisplayPort will also leave your HDMI ports free, which is great if you want to connect a game console or other device.

Discussions

Difference HDMI 1.4 from HDMI 2.0, HDMI 2.0a

For more than a decade, the HDMI connector has been the most common high-definition signal transmission standard. The choice in its favor was made by almost all market participants, thanks to availability, support for all modern technologies and constant development. Developers of HDMI adapters are constantly improving their brainchild, providing manufacturers and users with the very best that the AV industry has achieved.

HDMI switching is updated more often than other AV signal transmission standards, and sometimes this creates certain difficulties for ordinary users. From version to version, trying not only to keep up with the times, but to set the development vector, the developers add more and more new “features” to the standard.

When it’s something revolutionary, the new version is assigned an ascending number (1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2, 2.1), and when it comes to expanding existing functionality, an alphabetic value is added to this number (1.2a, 1.3 a, 1.4b, 2.0a, etc.). Today I would like to tell you what is the difference between HDMI 1.4 and HDMI 2.0, HDMI 2.0a (b) and other versions that are not related to 4K resolution.

Actual versions of HDMI

Today, the current version is HDMI 2.0 (a / b), which was officially announced on September 4, 2013. Equipment with its support began to appear on sale in 2014, and now this interface is already on board many devices.

But this does not mean that devices with support for earlier versions should be thrown away. Not at all! As you will see from the tables below, for the average user to watch satellite / cable / terrestrial HD TV channels and movies, and for laptops and home computers, HDMI 1. 2-1.4 will be enough.

Although, of course, the version 2.0 specification contains more «goodies» with an eye to 5-7 years ahead. But running ahead of the locomotive and now trying to look for a TV with HDMI 2.1 “on board” is absolutely not worth it. It has simply not yet been produced, because it was presented only at the beginning of January 2017. So, let’s proceed to a detailed study of the specifications of various versions of HDMI …

The main characteristics of HDMI of different versions

Let’s turn to the main characteristics of different versions of HDMI, and most importantly, find out what is the difference between HDMI 1.4 and 2.0 (the most current versions). Note the almost fivefold increase in throughput of the latest version compared to version 1.4.

HDMI Version
1.0–1.2a 1. 3–1.3a 1.4–1.4b 2.0-2.0b 2.1
Signal specifications
Capacity 4.95 Gbit/s 10.2 Gbit/s 10.2 Gbit/s 18.0 Gbit/s 48.0 Gbit/s
Maximum baud rate 3.96 Gbit/s 8.16 Gbit/s 8.16 Gbit/s 14.4 Gbit/s 42.6 Gbit/s
TMDS 165MHz 340MHz 340MHz 600MHz 1200MHz
Number of TMDS channels 3 3 3 3 4
Coding scheme 8b/10b 8b/10b 8b/10b 8b/10b 16b/18b
Compression (optional) DSC 1. 2
Color format support
RGB Yes
YC B C R 4:4:4 Yes
YC B C R 4:2:2 Yes
YC B C R 4:2:0 Yes Yes
G color depth
8bpc (24bit/px) Yes
10bpc (30bit/px) Yes
12bpc (36bit/px) Yes
16bpc (48bit/px) Yes Yes Yes Yes
Color space
SMPTE 170M Yes
ITU-R BT. 601 Yes
ITU-R BT.709 Yes
sRGB Yes Yes Yes Yes
xvYCC Yes Yes Yes Yes
sYCC 601 Yes Yes Yes
Adobe YCC601 Yes Yes Yes
Adobe RGB (1998) Yes Yes Yes
ITU-R BT.2020 Yes Yes
Audio specifications
Sample rate per channel (max) 192kHz
Audio frequency (max) ? ? 768 kHz 1536 kHz 1536 kHz
Sample size 16-24 bits 16-24 bits 16-24 bits 16-24 bits 16-24 bits
Number of audio channels (max) 8 8 8 32 32

This data from the official HDMI specification says little to the average user. Much more often people are interested in what resolution and frame rate the standard supports, because it is these data that are widely advertised by manufacturers of TVs, monitors, computer hardware and other equipment, and are also indicated in the characteristics of games and video files.

Maximum HDMI support frequencies and resolutions

Now that’s more interesting! And it’s more interesting because the lion’s share of consumers want to know not data on TMDS or color depth, but “will the new video card pull 4K”, or “can I watch Full HD channels on this TV”, etc.

Video format Version HDMI / Max bit rate
Approval Refresh rate (Hz) Baud rate 1.0–1.1 1. 2–1.2a 1.3–1.4b 2.0-2.0b 2.1
3.96 Gbit/s 3.96 Gbit/s 8.16 Gbit/s 14.4 Gbit/s 42.6 Gbit/s
H D Ready

24 576 Mbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
30 720 Mbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 1.45 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
120 2.99 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes
Full HD ( 1080p )
1920 × 1080
24 1. 26 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
30 1.58 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 3.20 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
120 6.59 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
144 8.00 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
240 14.00 Gbit/s Yes Yes
2K
(
1440p )
2560 × 1440
30 2.78 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 5. 63 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
75 7.09 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
120 11.59 Gbit/s Yes Yes
144 14.08 Gbit/s Yes Yes
240 24.62 Gbit/s Yes
4K
3840 × 2160
30 6.18 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
60 12.54 Gbit/s Yes Yes
75 15.79 Gbit/s Yes
120 25. 82 Gbit/s Yes
144 31.35 Gbit/s Yes
240 54.84 Gbit/s Yes
5K
5120 × 2880
30 10.94 Gbit/s Yes Yes
60 22.18 Gbit/s Yes
120 45.66 Gbit/s Yes
8K
7680 × 4320
30 24.48 Gbit/s Yes
60 49. 65 Gbit/s Yes
120 102.2 Gbit/s Yes

As you can see, almost the full potential of Full HD, which is quite enough for a simple viewer, was revealed in HDMI version 1.3-1.4. It is with a resolution of 1920 × 1080 HD TV channels are broadcast.

4K content is quite possible to watch (or play) already on equipment with HDMI 1.4 support, however, only at a frequency of 30 Hz. But a huge number of people do not even know about some kind of Hertz … HDMI 2.0 and higher gives a huge increase in resolution, bandwidth, and frames. But is it necessary right now? To whom and for what?

Supported HDMI functions of all versions

Now let’s talk about the HDMI functions supported by different versions.
In version 1.4, everything most needed (3D, ARC, CEC) is already available, and what is introduced, starting from version 2. 0, looks rather redundant for most users. Judge for yourself: HDMI 2.0 has Full HD 3D at 120fps, 4:2:0 chroma subsampling, 25fps 3D formats, and HE-AAC and DRA audio standards.

And in fact: few people are interested in 3D anymore (this year Samsung and LG curtailed the production of 3D panels, other manufacturers will soon follow them). 4:2:0, DRA… «What is this?» – ask 95% of buyers, and what really matters is only support for 4K at 60 frames per second (FPS).

Functions HDMI version
1.0 1.1 1.2–1.2a 1.3–1.3a 1.4–1.4b 2.0-2.0b 2.1
Full HD Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD video Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
DVD Audio Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Super Audio CD (DSD) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Auto lip-sync Yes Yes Yes Yes
Dolby TrueHD / DTS-HD Master Audio Yes Yes Yes Yes
Updated list of CEC commands Yes Yes Yes Yes
3D video Yes Yes Yes
Ethernet channel (100 Mbit/s) Yes Yes Yes
Audio Return Channel (ARC) Yes Yes Yes
4 audio streams Yes Yes
2 video streams (Dual View) Yes Yes
Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG) HDR OETF Yes Yes
Static HDR (static HDR metadata) Yes Yes
Dynamic HDR (dynamic HDR metadata) Yes
Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC) Yes
Variable Refresh Rate (VRR Game Mode) Yes
Video Stream Compression (DSC) Yes

Protecting HDMI ports

What really matters is protecting HDMI ports from burn-in. Here, unfortunately, no new version of the standard will save … HDMI ports were on fire from “hot plugging”, i.e. connections without de-energization, and they burn. Although manufacturers are trying to somehow alleviate the situation by adding additional protection to the circuits of their devices, this does not always help. This happens because there are quite high (about 100 volts) static potentials on the device cases.

Protecting HDMI interfaces Dr.HD HDMI Protector

When devices are connected, these potentials are equalized (discharge), resulting in equipment damage. This problem has been known since the very beginning of the appearance of the HDMI interface. All this is a consequence of the general cheapness of components. Such is the circuitry … It doesn’t matter who the manufacturer of your TV or video card is. The problem lies in the interface itself.

Therefore, whatever version of HDMI your devices support, they should be switched only when all devices in the circuit are disconnected from the socket! If this is not possible or you just want to additionally secure expensive equipment, you can (and sometimes need to) use HDMI protection. Such devices can be easily bought in specialized stores.

HDMI port protection DL-SP

Such passive elements (in other words, fuses) will protect equipment with HDMI interfaces from electrostatic discharges, potential difference when connecting equipment “hot”, as well as lightning. They are active on all TMDS channels and will act as the ultimate ESD protection. If suddenly the discharge goes through the cable, the defender will take the whole blow on himself.

In conclusion

So, I hope we managed to clarify the issue not only of the difference between HDMI 1.4 and HDMI 2.0 (a / b), but also other versions of the HDMI standard. Now you know that it makes no sense to try to set the resolution to 4K on your new video card if you have an old monitor, and you can watch satellite HD channels in excellent quality on a TV with the very first version of HDMI.
Author: Andrey Shchukin.

https://ultrahd.su/video/raznica-hdmi-1-4-hdmi-2-0-hdmi-2-0a. htmlThe difference between HDMI 1.4 and HDMI 2.0, HDMI 2.0a

AndreyVideoVideoFor more than a decade, the HDMI connector has been the most common high-definition signal transmission standard. The choice in its favor was made by almost all market participants, thanks to availability, support for all modern technologies and constant development. Developers of HDMI adapters are constantly improving their offspring, providing manufacturers and users with all the best…AndreyAndrey
AuthorUltraHD

HDMI 1.4, HDMI 2.0 (a/b) and HDMI 2.1

For more than a decade, HDMI has been the most widely used high definition signal transmission standard. The choice in its favor was made by almost all market participants, thanks to availability, support for all modern technologies and constant development. HDMI developers are constantly improving their brainchild, providing manufacturers and users with the best that the AV industry has achieved.

HDMI is updated more often than other AV signal transmission standards, and sometimes this creates certain difficulties for ordinary users. From version to version, trying not only to keep up with the times, but to set the development vector, the developers add more and more new “features” to the standard.

When it’s something revolutionary, the new version is assigned an ascending number (1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2, 2.1), and when it comes to expanding existing functionality, a letter value is added to this number ( 1.2a, 1.3a, 1.4b, 2.0a, etc.). Today I would like to tell you what is the difference between HDMI 1.4 and HDMI 2.0, HDMI 2.0a (b) and other versions that are not related to 4K resolution.

Actual versions of HDMI

Today, the current version is HDMI 2.0 (a / b), which was officially announced on September 4, 2013. Equipment with its support began to appear on sale in 2014, and now this interface is already on board many devices.

But this does not mean that devices with support for earlier versions should be thrown away. Not at all! As you will see from the tables below, for the average user to watch satellite / cable / terrestrial HD TV channels and movies, and for laptops and home computers, HDMI 1.2-1.4 will be enough.

Although, of course, the version 2.0 specification contains more «goodies» with an eye to 5-7 years ahead. But running ahead of the locomotive and now trying to look for equipment with HDMI 2.1 «on board» is absolutely not worth it. It has simply not yet been produced, because it was presented only at the beginning of January 2017. So, let’s proceed to a detailed study of the specifications of various versions of HDMI …

The main characteristics of HDMI of different versions

Let’s turn to the main characteristics of different versions of HDMI, and most importantly, find out what is the difference between HDMI 1.4 and 2.0 (the most current versions). Note the almost fivefold increase in throughput of the latest version compared to version 1.4.

9

HDMI Version
1.0–1.2A 1.3–1.3A 1.4–1.4B 2.0-2.0b 2.1
Signal Specifications
Bandwidth 4.95 Gbit/s 10.2 Gbit/s 10.2 Gbit/s 18.0 Gbit/s 48.0 Gbit/s
Maximum baud rate 3.96 Gbit/s 8.16 Gbit/s 8.16 Gbit/s 14.4 Gbit/s 42.6 Gbit/s
TMDS 165MHz 340MHz 340MHz 600MHz 1200MHz
Number of TMDS channels 3 3 3 3 4
Coding scheme 8b/10b 8b/10b 8b/10b 8b/10b 16b/18b
Compression (optional) DSC 1. 2
Color format support
RGB Yes
YC B C R 4:4:4 Yes
YC B C R 4:2:2 Yes
YC B C R 4:2:0 Yes Yes
Color depth
8 bpc (24 bit/px) Yes
10bpc (30bit/px) Yes
12bpc (36bit/px) Yes
16bpc (48bit/px) Yes Yes Yes Yes
Color space
SMPTE 170M Yes
ITU-R BT. 601 Yes
ITU-R BT.709 Yes
sRGB Yes Yes Yes Yes
xvYCC Yes Yes Yes Yes
sYCC 601 Yes Yes Yes
Adobe YCC601 Yes Yes Yes
Adobe RGB (1998) Yes Yes Yes
ITU-R BT.2020 Yes Yes
Audio specifications
Sample rate per channel (max) 192kHz
Audio frequency (max) ? ? 768 kHz 1536 kHz 1536 kHz
Sample size 16-24 bits 16-24 bits 16-24 bits 16-24 bits 16-24 bits
Number of audio channels (max) 8 8 8 32 32

This data from the official HDMI specification says little to the average user. Much more often people are interested in what resolution and frame rate the standard supports, because it is these data that are widely advertised by manufacturers of TVs, monitors, computer hardware and other equipment, and are also indicated in the characteristics of games and video files.

Maximum HDMI frequencies and resolutions

Now that’s more interesting! And it’s more interesting because the lion’s share of consumers want to know not data on TMDS or color depth, but “will the new video card pull 4K”, or “can I watch Full HD channels on this TV”, etc.

9146–1

Video format version HDMI / Data transmission speed
Resolution Frequency of update (HZ) Data transfer rate 1.0–1.1 2.0–2.0b 2.1
3.96 Gbit/s 3.96 Gbit/s 8.16 Gbit/s 14. 4 Gbit/s 42.6 Gbit/s
HD Ready
(720p)
1280 × 720
24 576 Mbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
30 720 Mbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 1.45 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
120 2.99 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes
Full HD (1080p)
1920 × 1080
24 1.26 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
30 1.58 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 3. 20 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
120 6.59 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
144 8.00 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
240 14.00 Gbit/s Yes Yes
2K
(1440p)
2560 × 1440
30 2.78 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 5.63 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
75 7.09 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
120 11. 59 Gbit/s Yes Yes
144 14.08 Gbit/s Yes Yes
240 24.62 Gbit/s Yes
4K
3840 × 2160
30 6.18 Gbit/s Yes Yes Yes
60 12.54 Gbit/s Yes Yes
75 15.79 Gbit/s Yes
120 25.82 Gbit/s Yes
144 31.35 Gbit/s Yes
240 54. 84 Gbit/s Yes
5K
5120 × 2880
30 10.94 Gbit/s Yes Yes
60 22.18 Gbit/s Yes
120 45.66 Gbit/s Yes
8K
7680 × 4320
30 24.48 Gbit/s Yes
60 49.65 Gbit/s Yes
120 102.2 Gbit/s Yes

As you can see, almost the full potential of Full HD, which is quite enough for a simple viewer, was revealed back in HDMI version 1. 3-1.4. It is with a resolution of 1920 × 1080 that HD TV channels are broadcast.

4K content is quite possible to watch (or play) already on equipment with HDMI 1.4 support, however, only at a frequency of 30 Hz. But a huge number of people do not even know about some kind of Hertz … HDMI 2.0 and higher gives a huge increase in resolution, bandwidth, and frames. But is it necessary right now? To whom and for what?

Supported HDMI functions of all versions

Now let’s talk about the HDMI functions supported by different versions.

In version 1.4, everything most needed (3D, ARC, CEC) is already available, and what is introduced, starting from version 2.0, looks rather redundant for most users. Judge for yourself: HDMI 2.0 has Full HD 3D at 120fps, 4:2:0 chroma subsampling, 25fps 3D formats, and HE-AAC and DRA audio standards.

And in fact: few people are interested in 3D anymore (this year Samsung and LG have curtailed the production of 3D panels, other manufacturers will soon follow them). 4:2:0, DRA… «What is this?» — 95% of buyers will ask, and what really matters is 4K support at 60 frames per second (FPS).

Functions HDMI Version
1.0 1.1 1.2–1.2A 1.3–1.3A 1.4–1.1454

2.1
Full HD Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD video Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
DVD-Audio Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Super Audio CD (DSD) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Auto lip-sync Yes Yes Yes Yes
Dolby TrueHD / DTS-HD Master Audio Yes Yes Yes Yes
Updated list of CEC commands Yes Yes Yes Yes
3D video Yes Yes Yes
Ethernet channel (100 Mbit/s) Yes Yes Yes
Audio Return Channel (ARC) Yes Yes Yes
4 audio streams Yes Yes
2 video streams (Dual View) Yes Yes
Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG) HDR OETF Yes Yes
Static HDR (static HDR metadata) Yes Yes
Dynamic HDR (dynamic HDR metadata) Yes
Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC) Yes
Variable Refresh Rate (VRR Game Mode) Yes
Video Stream Compression (DSC) Yes

Protecting HDMI ports

What is really important is the protection of HDMI ports from burn-in (for more on this, read our article HDMI interface burn-in due to hot plugging). Here, unfortunately, no new version of the standard will save … HDMI ports were on fire from “hot plugging”, i.e. connections without de-energization, and they burn. Although manufacturers are trying to somehow alleviate the situation by adding additional protection to the circuits of their devices, this does not always help. This happens because there are quite high (about 100 volts) static potentials on the device cases.

Protecting HDMI interfaces Dr.HD HDMI Protector

When devices are connected, these potentials are equalized (discharge), resulting in equipment damage. This problem has been known since the very beginning of the appearance of the HDMI interface. All this is a consequence of the general cheapness of components. Such is the circuitry … It doesn’t matter who the manufacturer of your TV or video card is. The problem lies in the interface itself.

Therefore, whatever version of HDMI your devices support, they should be switched only when all devices in the circuit are disconnected from the socket! If this is not possible or you just want to additionally secure expensive equipment, you can (and sometimes need to) use HDMI protection. Such devices can be easily bought in specialized stores.

Such passive elements (in other words, fuses) will protect equipment with HDMI interfaces from electrostatic discharges, potential difference when connecting equipment “to hot”, as well as lightning pickups. They are active on all TMDS channels and will act as the ultimate ESD protection. If suddenly the discharge goes through the cable, the defender will take the whole blow on himself.

In conclusion

So, I hope we managed to clarify not only the difference between HDMI 1.4 and HDMI 2.0 (a / b), but also other versions of the HDMI standard. Now you know that it makes no sense to try to set the resolution to 4K on your new video card if you have an old monitor, and you can watch satellite HD channels in excellent quality on a TV with the very first version of HDMI.

What is HDMI 2.1. And is it needed in 2021?

Next-generation PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X consoles are equipped with HDMI 2. 1 output and can, according to the manufacturers, play content in 8K and, much closer to the general public, 4K at 120 frames per second. But for this you need an appropriate TV. It is believed that in an ideal TV for new consoles, HDMI 2.1 should be mandatory.

Photo: Pixabay

In addition to console manufacturers, AMD and NVIDIA have also caught up: their new video cards are also equipped with modern HDMI 2.1. However, for connecting to monitors with a high screen refresh rate, video cards have long had a Display Port connector.

However, HDMI 2.1 is still not found in every TV. A modern connector is usually installed in more expensive models, and there are a lot of owners of 4K TVs with HDMI 2.0 now. So is it worth paying more?

How HDMI versions differ and why it matters

HDMI is the main way to connect modern video equipment to a TV. Analog connectors have almost sunk into oblivion: they remain in TVs only to maintain compatibility with older devices.

In the past, image quality often depended on the price of analog cable—expensive cables were typically thicker, more resistant to interference, and provided better picture quality. The digital signal is always the same and the cost of the cable does not play a significant role. The main thing is that the cable is in principle good. However, in reality this is not entirely true. Image quality still depends on the cable, albeit in a slightly different sense.

Premium is not empty marketing. The fact is that HDMI cables, in fact, do not have versions, only certification plays a role. If the cable can transmit a 4K @ 60Hz signal, then it is called Premium

It’s all about versions. Like the USB interface, HDMI has gone through many revisions: from the first version in 2002 to the most modern version 2.1 at the moment, announced in 2017. The main difference between the versions has always been primarily throughput, measured in gigabits per second.

So, the main feature of HDMI 2. 0 before its predecessor HDMI 1.4 was the ability to output video in 4K at 60 frames per second, instead of only 30 frames. Passport throughput in this case is 18 Gbps versus 10.2 Gbps. But over time, even this becomes not enough, which leads to the emergence of new standards.

HDMI 2.1 benefits

Resolution and frame rate. The most important advantage HDMI 2.1 has over its predecessor is the ability to transmit 4K at 120 fps and 8K at 60 fps. The still exotic 5K and 10K are also supported.

This feature is heavily advertised for gamers. 60 frames is now considered the minimum comfortable even for calm single-player games, not to mention fast-paced or competitive multiplayer games. The frequencies of gaming monitors and gaming laptop displays have long overcome this barrier towards 144 Hz, 240 Hz and even 300 Hz.

As for 8K and above, despite the increasing number of TVs with this resolution, there is still little content. Even in 4K, there is still not much content — most movies and TV channels are broadcast in Full HD.

Dynamic HDR. Simply put, HDR (high dynamic range) makes the dark areas of an image darker and the light areas brighter. Due to this, the picture becomes more saturated. Dynamic HDR is different in that the metadata needed to properly display the content is transmitted for each frame.

Screenshot of PlayStation 5 settings. Due to HDMI 2.0 bandwidth limitations, the [email protected] HDR signal is in YUV 422 format, but this is not critical for the game console.

Dynamic HDR also works on HDMI 2.0, but subject to bandwidth limitations. Dynamic HDR includes, for example, Dolby Vision and HDR10+.

Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC). Improved audio return channel. Simply put, Audio Return Channel is the sound output from the TV to the receiver or soundbar via HDMI. Its more advanced version, Enhanced Audio Return Channel, allows you to transmit high-quality multi-channel audio in formats such as DTS Master, DTS:X, Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Atmos and others.

Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM). Automatic low latency mode. In modern TVs, as a rule, there is a mode in which post-processing of the image is turned off, which makes the picture smoother and improves its quality. Movies and video content do look better, but in games where instant response to player actions is important, this only gets in the way.

Therefore, TVs have a «Game Mode» that must be turned on manually. In the HDMI 2.1 specifications, this function is given to automation — the game console tells the TV when to activate the low latency mode and when it can be turned off.

Variable Refresh Rate (VRR). Variable frame rate. When the frame rate rendered by a game console or computer does not match the monitor refresh rate, the so-called tearing occurs — the image becomes torn. In fact, you see only part of the new frame. This happens because the hardware cannot provide a stable frame rate due to a lack of performance.

An error occurred during the download.

This does not happen with variable framerate as only fully rendered frames will be displayed. Roughly speaking, the display frequency adjusts on the fly to the capabilities of the hardware on which the game is running. This is especially important at high frame rates, when it can be difficult for hardware to maintain stable performance.

Really useful feature. Similar AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA G-Sync technologies have already proved their worth.

Quick Frame Transport (QFT). The technology allows to reduce the input lag by optimizing data transmission over the cable. Simply put, the time it takes for a signal to travel from a source to a receiver is reduced.

Quick Media Switching (QMS). Can be translated as fast switching between signal sources. When switching between inputs or when changing the image output settings on the source, a black screen will inevitably appear for a couple of seconds until the TV adjusts to the new settings. With the use of this technology, such a delay should become a thing of the past.

[email protected] — what’s the catch?

In fact, the main advantage of HDMI 2.1 can be called support for 4K at 120 frames per second. And first of all, this mode is relevant for games. But there are nuances. The fact is that the power of the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X, as well as most video cards, will not be enough to provide high frame rates in 4K resolution. Especially when it comes to ray tracing enabled.

For example, Control Ultimate Edition on consoles runs at 1440p at 60 frames without ray tracing and at 30 frames with ray tracing. It is worth noting that the picture is still output in 4K, and 1440p is the rendering resolution. That is, in most graphically advanced games, at best, you should expect 4K at 60 frames per second, and HDMI 2.0 is enough for this.

Native 4K at 120 fps is only achievable in undemanding titles like Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom.

However, there are already games that officially support 120 FPS mode. However, this does not change the essence of the matter. According to Digital Foundry, in the console version of Nioh 2, the resolution ranges from 792 to 1080 rubles and the graphics are rather poor. Even if the console menu is set to 4K, rendering still occurs at a lower resolution. In this case, there is no particular point in 4K, the picture will still be soapy.

The good news is, if your HDMI 2.0 TV or monitor supports a 120Hz refresh rate at 1080p, you will be able to enable 120 FPS mode on PS5 or Xbox Series X. Bearing in mind that at this frame rate, games will still run at resolutions below 4K, you will not feel much difference in picture quality.

An error occurred during the download.

Things are a little better with computer hardware. Graphics cards like the RTX 3080 and 3090 can really pull well-optimized or undemanding projects in native 4K at frame rates above 100.

An error occurred during the download.

In addition, DLSS technology is of great importance, which significantly increases performance even on weaker cards. The same Nioh 2 produces about 90 frames per second already on the RTX 3070.

DLSS only works on NVIDIA video cards, but AMD has its own analogue in development — FidelityFX Super Resolution. The technology will work on both Radeon graphics cards and consoles. There is no exact launch date yet. However, on consoles, you should count on 4K 60 FPS + ray tracing support rather than 120 FPS.

How to tell if an HDMI 2. 1 port is “fake”

The presence of an HDMI 2.1 port in the specification does not in itself guarantee that all the claimed benefits will work on a given TV. The ability of the interface to transmit 120 frames in 4K does not mean at all that the TV matrix is ​​capable of reproducing them. If the matrix according to its characteristics has a refresh rate of only 60 or 100 Hertz, then this will be the maximum frame rate for the signal.

Panasonic TX-55HZR1000 TV specifications. Screenshot: panasonic.com

Simply put, if the specifications say HDMI 2.1, it means that only some functions can be implemented. Before buying, you need to make sure that the features you need, for example, 120 frames per second, are really present.

LG SM8200PLA TV specifications. Screenshot: lg.com

It also happens the other way around, there is no mention of HDMI 2.1 in the specifications, but there is support for some characteristic functions. As a rule, these are functions that do not require large bandwidth: VRR, ALLM, eARC. For example, in TV 2019LG SM8200PLA announced support for ALLM.

This is also interesting:

Features of HDMI 2.0a, 2.0b and 2.1 versions

The HDMI Forum, the organization responsible for this A/V connection, has announced version 2.0.
Then HDMI 2.0a, HDMI 2.0b and most recently HDMI 2.1.

So what do they mean to you?

In fact, many manufacturers do not list the HDMI version,
used on their TVs, video players and other devices. As a rule, you are sure that the purchased
the new 4K HDR TV will work with the new 4K HDR video player and deliver the highest quality signals,
available to everyone. However, when connecting equipment that is not new, the HDMI version may
great importance. This is because older HDMI devices may not be able to transmit the latest video formats, but
namely 4K and HDR, or the highest quality versions of each. If you are worried about this, you should know
the HDMI version of the device you are purchasing.

What is behind the version number

If you buy any product with HDMI, you must
make sure it has at least the HDMI 2.0 specification. This gives you 4K resolution and no frame rate.
less than 60 Hz. More importantly, you get HDCP 2.2, a copy protection protocol, so you can
actually view 4K content sent from an external device (such as a player or 4K
Blu-ray).
Moreover, each component in your AV chain needs HDMI 2.0 / HDCP 2.2 support in order to
his works. So if you have an HDMI 2.0 4K player and an HDMI 2.0 TV, but the old
HDMI 1.4 soundbar or AV receiver… You’re out of luck.
Version 2.0a was small
update to add support for High Dynamic Range (HDR).
Version «b» for the most part
is a carryover from «a» and «_» versions 2.0 with some clarifications, in particular from Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG).
This is another way to deliver HDR content.
The only reason to mention 2. 0b is because
that it is implemented on 2017 TVs instead of HDMI 2.1.

The Big Leap to 2.1

HDMI 2.1 is an upcoming update and it’s a significant leap. He
takes everything from 2.0b and adds insane stuff like 10K resolution at a whopping 120Hz, much
more than any TV can do now or will be able to do in the near future. HDMI 2.1 is like
buying an industrial backhoe because you think you might plant roses someday.
It is doubtful that you will see many products implementing the full 2.1 specification this year.
This
a huge jump requires new cables, but only if you want to transmit higher resolutions and frequencies
frames. These new cables are part of this new specification. These cables, called «48G», represent
a much larger «pipe» through which this data flow passes.
As a result, here is the table,
comparing the possibilities of formats.

Video format HDMI Version / Maximum Bandwidth
Short Resolution Update frequency

(Hz)

Required
transmission rate

data

1. 0–1.1 1.2–1.2a 1.3–1.4b 2.0–2.0b 2.1
3.96 Gbps 3.96 Gbps 8.16 Gbps 14.4 Gbps 42.6 Gbps
720p 1280 × 720 30 720 Mbps Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 1. 45 Gbps Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
120 2.99 Gbps No Yes Yes Yes Yes
1080p 1920 × 1080 30 1.58 Gbps Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 3.20 Gbps Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
120 6. 59 Gbps No No Yes Yes Yes
144 8.00 Gbps No No Yes Yes Yes
240 14.00 Gbps No No 4:2:0 Yes Yes
1440p 2560 × 1440 30 2.78 Gbps No Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 5. 63 Gbps No No Yes Yes Yes
75 7.09 Gbps No No Yes Yes Yes
120 11.59 Gbps No No 4:2:0 Yes Yes
144 14.08 Gbps No No 4:2:0 Yes Yes
240 24. 62 Gbps No No No 4:2:0 Yes
4K 3840 × 2160 30 6.18 Gbps No No Yes Yes Yes
60 12.54 Gbps No No 4:2:0 Yes Yes
75 15.79 Gbps No No 4:2:0 4:2:0 Yes
120 25. 82 Gbps No No No 4:2:0 Yes
144 31.35 Gbps No No No No Yes
240 54.84 Gbps No No No No DSC
5K 5120 × 2880 30 10.94 Gbps No No 4:2:0 Yes Yes
60 22. 18 Gbps No No No 4:2:0 Yes
120 45.66 Gbps No No No No DSC
8K 7680 × 4320 30 24.48 Gbps No No No 4:2:0 Yes
60 49.65 Gbps No No No No DSC
120 102. 2 Gbps No No No No DSC
1.0–1.1 1.2–1.2a 1.3–1.4b 2.0–2.0b 2.1
HDMI version

4:2:0 — mode available when Y′CBCR 9 scheme is selected0005

DSC — available when using Display Stream Compression (DSC)

What are the improvements in HDMI 2.1 and what is the benefit to me?

You recently read here about what HDMI 2.1 is and why you need it. Do you want to stay up to date and get more insight into this hot topic for home theater enthusiasts like you? Let’s dive a little deeper into the improvements that HDMI 2. 1 has to offer.

Better picture resolution and higher frame rate (HFR )
HDMI 2.1 allows higher picture resolution in 8K, and higher frame rate up to 120fps. Resolution improves the clarity and sharpness of an image, meaning you can see more detail and have a smaller screen distance or a larger screen without noticing any pixels. Higher refresh rates provide smoother motion in games or movies with fast motion. The film «Gemini» allows you to get an idea of ​​​​this. Recorded at 120 frames per second, Ultra HD Blu-ray was one of the first movies to feature 60 frames per second (instead of the usual 24 frames per second). HDMI 2.1 now provides 4K resolution at 120 fps, and for 8K up to 60 fps.

© HDMI.org.

Get the best color and contrast with the dynamic HDR
HDMI 2. 1 presents new video technologies with an extended dynamic range, in particular, by supporting metadata in Dynamic HDR technology. While static HDR, like the well-received HDR10 (on UHD Blu-ray discs, Netflix movies and other streaming services) or HLG, allows you to set the maximum and minimum brightness for an entire movie, dynamic metadata can define this on a frame-by-frame or scene-by-scene basis. , This allows for even more gradation between the darkest and brightest color in the film. HDMI 2.1 officially adds support for formats like HDR10+ and the latest Technicolor Dynamic HDR format.

Get the best sound quality available from your TV applications and devices connected to your TV with Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC ) the same HDMI cable that transmits the image from the AVR to the TV. In any case, the bandwidth for this channel was limited so that only stereo could be transmitted. Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC) can now transmit high-resolution audio over an HDMI 2. 1 connection. As a result, you can enjoy Dolby Atmos surround sound from built-in TV apps or listen to high-definition audio from all devices connected to your TV via HDMI.

Watch more, wait less. Say goodbye to blank screens with Quick Media Switching (QMS )
Are you tired of the blank screen that appears when you load a movie? Depending on the equipment you have, it may take up to 15 seconds for the source to re-sync to the TV just due to changes in the frame rate of the content. If QMS technology is implemented in the source and in the destination, the transition between different formats will occur smoothly for content with different frame rates.

In addition to improvements that improve picture and sound quality for movie lovers, HDMI 2.1 also includes much-anticipated features for PC gamers and console gamers.

Improve motion clarity and fluidity with variable refresh rate (VRR ):
HDMI 2. 1 can support higher frame rates for smoother video, but also allows variable frame rates. Modern PC and console games do not use a single frame rate throughout the game. It varies, sometimes quite a lot, depending on the complexity of the scene and the capabilities of the processor in the GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) gaming devices. If the GPU’s rendering speed changes, there is a mismatch between what the set-top box outputs and what the TV displays. With the new HDMI 2.1 feature, the on-screen display speed is synchronized with the GPU output to avoid frame tearing or input lag, ensuring smooth game movement and no glitches in gameplay.

Instant Video Display with Quick Frame Transport (QFT ):
This feature reduces the time required to transfer a frame of video from a source (such as a PC or game console) to a display or VR glasses. If the source and screen support this feature, images will always be sent at the highest possible frame rate, regardless of GPU speed or display speed, allowing the image to be sent immediately when a frame is ready from the GPU. Gamers will notice much less lag, especially those who enjoy fast-paced first-person shooters. VR will benefit from equally reduced time between movements and the world presented through glasses.

Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM ):
ALLM tells the TV or other display that the system is in game mode. When this happens, the display and the AVR/soundbar will automatically turn off all picture processing in the receiver or TV, which can cause delay and out of sync between picture and sound. Now you never have to manually select game mode on your TV.

HDMI Cable Buying Guide

What you need to know about the evolution from standard audio/video connections to high definition connections

Quick Start

High Definition Multimedia Interface (hereinafter: HDMI) cables are used to connect modern TVs with audio/video tuners, external cable TV tuners, media players, and Blu-ray players. They transmit audio and video signals over the same cable, making it easy to connect. It’s not easy to choose the right HDMI cable. Previous generation cables do not support current features. The latest version of HDMI 2.1 cables supports resolutions up to 10K and dynamic HDR (high dynamic range). In this article, we will explain the difference between different versions of HDMI cables, including the latest version of the cable: HDMI 2.1. You will also find out which HDMI cable you need for your 4K TV. And finally, we will look at questions about actually connecting HDMI cables, provide solutions and answers.

Now for the details

HDMI digital interfaces are the best way to connect HDMI-equipped HDTVs and home theaters to high-definition components such as Blu-ray players, PlayStation and Xbox 360 game consoles, satellite HDTV receivers and cable television. Today, more often than not, HDMI is the only solution for digital HD connectivity. While most TVs still have a component input, it has all but disappeared on Blu-ray players. Equipment manufacturers are phasing out the use of component video output. And now, after many years, disc makers have the option to put a «digital flag» on a Blu-ray disc, which will limit component video resolution to 480i. This is for those who like high definition pictures. Who doesn’t like them? – You will definitely want an HDMI connection on your equipment.

HDMI is the right choice for transmitting HD and 4K Ultra HD video signals. It is also capable of supporting up to 8 channels of high definition audio.

One cable is very convenient, but that’s not all.

HDMI has the unique ability to carry high-definition video and multi-channel audio signals over a single cable, but this interface has other great advantages.

  • Superb picture and sound: HDMI connections store audio and video signals in digital 1s and 0s, eliminating the reduced picture and sound quality caused by digital-to-analog and inverse conversion. HDMI supports video resolutions up to 8K/10K, which is important for 4K/8K TVs and Blu-ray players. And the HDMI audio capability supports up to 8 channels of 24bit 192kHz very high quality audio.

  • 3D Video Transmission Capability: HDMI is the only connection capable of transmitting 3D video signals from components such as a 3D Blu-ray player to your 3D TV.

  • More than just audio and video: The standard HDMI connector has 18 pins that carry not only audio and video data, but also 2-way control and identification information, even with minimal voltage. HDMI cables labeled “1.4” or later can also provide an Internet connection between compatible devices.

  • Industrial copy protection: seems to be more of a benefit to movie studio owners than to consumers, but directly impacts the quantity and quality of what we watch now and in the future. Widespread use of HDMI should satisfy most of Hollywood’s demand for strong copy protection to eliminate privacy. HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) is present on almost all HDMI-equipped devices, although it is not officially part of the HDMI specification. Without HDCP, both the quality and quantity of high-definition content delivered to consumers would be severely limited. However, HDCP protection has its downsides. One of its functions is to «authenticate» the connection between two components through a «digital handshake» and problems associated with the process of such a handshake can result in loss or degradation of the image or sound.

Little hints for choosing an HDMI cable

Some components already include an HDMI cable, but not all, so it’s best to plan on buying one to connect your unit for the best picture and sound. You won’t see a significant difference in picture quality between different HDMI cables. With analog video, you might see varying degrees of image quality on the display, while with digital video, you get a crisp image, or none at all. Although at times, we saw “flashes” (sparks) of the image due to a poor quality HDMI connection.
You still want to choose a high quality HDMI cable because of the length or indoor installation. Cables differ in the material from which they are made, as well as in the method of manufacture. Some are designed by the manufacturer to maintain maximum signal quality throughout the length of the cable. Some users experience interoperability issues when making HDMI connections, but this is almost never caused by the cable itself.

For indoor and commercial use, you will need a CL2 CL3/FT4 UL cable such as Key Digital.

Premium HDMI Cable Certification Program

High-quality, high-speed HDMI cables tested for quality 4K/Ultra-HD rich content

HDMI Premium™ Cable Certification Program includes additional and advanced cable testing and an authentication program and checks for high speed HDMI cables. The cables are tested to support the full bandwidth of 18 Gb/s from the HDMI 2.0b specification using an EMI test to verify the cable’s ability to minimize interference from wireless signals.

The program is designed to give end users the confidence to purchase new HDMI cables for their 4K/UltraHD products, which may include features such as 4K @ 60Hz, BT. 2020 and HDR. Members of the Premium Certification Program can advertise their ATC-tested High Speed ​​HDMI Cables as Premium High Speed ​​HDMI Cables or Premium High Speed ​​HDMI Cables with Ethernet by using a unique anti-counterfeiting mark on their products.

Members

Registered members of the HDMI Cable Certification Premium Program are referred to as «HDMI Adopters», and they are the only ones eligible to participate in the program. These Members may be branded on the market or supplied by manufacturers who enter the market with their own brand names. When scanning the Premium HDMI Cable Certification Label, the results will show the brand name that should appear on the packaging. Photo of a cable package certified by the Premium HDMI Cable Certification Program.

A complete list of HDMI Cable Certification Program members is available at hdmi.org

Trust the cable labeled

Certification ensures cables are genuine and certified throughout the supply chain. Each individual cable package must carry the Premium HDMI Cable Certification Label. Each label is unique for each individual package.

And only authorized HDMI manufacturers participating in this special program can order labels through secure extranet for HDMI certifiers.

The HDMI Cable Certification Program label is unique to each individual package. The HDMI smartphone app will provide quick authentication.

This is the only HDMI cable test program:

  • Administered by HDMI Specification Agent
  • Requires each length of each model line to test
  • Requires each cable to be tested by an authorized HDMI test center.
  • Regularly tests cables for continuous compliance testing throughout the life of the product
  • Requires a proprietary anti-counterfeiting label on every product
  • Uses a proprietary level 2 mobile scanning mobile app available for Android and Apple, as well as the top 10 Chinese mobile app stores.

Development/evolution of the

standard

HDMI is a universal connector for home digital equipment. The standard continues to evolve to meet the needs of home theater equipment. All versions of HDMI are compatible with previous versions, as well as DVI through an adapter (only video passes through the DVI connection, not audio). However, if you connect two devices, one with HDMI 1.3 and the other with 1.4, the system will be limited to 1.3.

The HDMI version listed in the device description does not guarantee a strict feature set. The reason for this is that the features listed for each HDMI version are optional, not required. Each manufacturer has the right to decide for himself what HDMI characteristics to equip this equipment with. In other words, a version 2.1 device can only support part of the functions of this standard, while the manufacturer has the right to claim support for HDMI version 2.1

Do I need to worry about compatibility between HDMI versions?

Only if you are working with components equipped with the latest version of HDMI — currently 2. 0a — and want to take advantage of certain new features from the new specification. However, each new version of HDMI is compatible with older versions, so components equipped with the old and new HDMI versions can work together. That is, if you use a 1.2 cable on a 1.4 set, or a 1.4 cable on a 1.1 set, you’ll get great high-definition picture and sound.

So what’s the difference between the HDMI versions? Take a look at our summary of HDMI’s evolution below:

HDMI 1.0 : The original specification supported a single-channel digital audio/video connection with 165 MHz bandwidth and a maximum bit rate of 4.9 Gbps (sufficient for 1080p video). Only two-channel audio. Released in December 2002.

HDMI 1.1 : Added multi-channel audio support for DVD-Audio (up to 5.1 channels). Released in May 2004.

HDMI 1.2 : Added support for multi-channel single-bit audio formats such as SACD (Super Audio CD). Enabled support for HDMI connectors on personal computers. Required displays with HDMI 1.2 or later to support future low voltage devices. Released in August 2005.

HDMI 1.2a : Electronic control functions (CEC) and commands for remote control functions are fully defined. Longer cable lengths must be provided by manufacturers for additional testing to meet specification. In order for a device to pass 1.2a testing, all of its HDMI connectors must be reviewed and approved by HDMI Licensing, LLC. Released in December 2005.

HDMI 1.3 : Increased bandwidth to 340 MHz and maximum bit rate to 10.2 Gbps (mainly for 3D video). Adopted Deep Color standard, which supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit color. Over one billion possible colors — previous versions were limited to 8-bit. (Note: Because color information is based on the three primary colors — red, green, and blue — you sometimes see 1.3x improved color depth, described as 30-bit, 36-bit, and 48-bit.) Added support for the xvYCC (also known as xvColor) wide color gamut color space standard, which supports 1. 8 times more colors than existing HDTV signals. (Commercial video content does not currently use Deep Color or x.v.Color.) Added the ability to output new lossless compressed digital audio formats (Dolby® TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™) for decoding by a compatible A/V receiver. Built-in automatic ‘lip sync’ control for perfect audio/video synchronization (sometimes a problem occurs when audio is sent to a receiver or surround processor while video is delivered directly to the display). A new mini connector has also been released for use with smaller devices such as digital cameras and camcorders. Released in June 2006.
Specification 1.3 was updated to 1.3a and then 1.3b. However, for consumers, there is no difference between versions 1.3, 1.3a, or 1.3b. These are minor changes that address production and testing issues and do not affect features or functionality.

Considering a 4K TV? Any quality HDMI cable labeled «high-speed» should be able to carry 4K video signals. (AudioQuest Chocolate pictured above)

HDMI 1.4 : Ethernet capability added. If you have one HDMI 1.4 device connected to your home network, it can share that connection with other Internet-ready HDMI 1.4 devices using an HDMI 1.4 cable. Note. As of 9/16, we are not aware of any components that support Ethernet over HDMI. Also included is the ability to send audio from your TV tuner back to your home theater receiver. HDMI inputs with this ARC (Audio Return Channel) feature are ideal for people who receive their high-definition programs over the air with an antenna and want to be able to enjoy surround sound through these TV shows. Released May 2009of the year.

The TV’s standard HDMI inputs accept video and audio from sources such as a Blu-ray player. If your TV has an HDMI input with ARC (Audio Return Channel), it can also pass audio from the TV’s built-in tuner and web apps back to an ARC-compatible A/V receiver or soundbar via a single HDMI cable. Thus, you do not need to connect a separate optical audio cable for sound.

HDMI 2.0 : Increased maximum bit rate to 18 Gbps to support new formats such as 4K HD video (3840 x 2160 pixels) at up to 60 frames per second. (Spec 1.4 also supports 4K video, but only up to 30 fps.) HDMI 2.0 also supports up to 32 audio channels, as well as dynamic auto lip sync and new extensions to the CEC control set. Released in September 2013.

HDMI 2.0a : HDR (High Dynamic Range) video image support added. HDR delivers improved image quality by providing greater detail in both dark and bright parts of an image. HDR information is encoded as additional metadata in HDR content such as 4K streaming video from Netflix® or Ultra HD Blu-ray discs. HDMI 2.0a allows devices to send and receive this metadata. Released in April 2015.

HDMI 2.1 : The most important format improvement since inception! Increased video resolutions and refresh rates, including 8K60Hz and 4K120Hz for immersive viewing and smooth detail in fast motion. Resolutions up to 10K are also supported for commercial AV systems as well as industrial and specialty applications.

Dynamic HDR support ensures that every moment of video is displayed with its ideal depth, detail, brightness, contrast and wider color gamut — on a scene-by-scene or even frame-by-frame basis.

The Ultra High Speed ​​HDMI cable supports 48 GB of bandwidth for uncompressed HDMI 2.1. The cable also has very low EMI emissions and is backwards compatible with earlier versions of the HDMI specification and can be used with existing HDMI devices.

eARC simplifies connection, provides greater ease of use and supports the most advanced audio formats and the highest sound quality. It will ensure full compatibility between audio devices and future HDMI 2.1 products.

Improved frequency refresh features provide an extra layer of smooth and seamless motion and transitions for games, movies and videos. They include:

  • Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) reduces or eliminates lag, stuttering and cracking for a more fluid and detailed gaming experience.
  • Quick Media Switching (QMS) for movies and videos eliminates the delay that can result in a blank screen before content is displayed.
  • Quick Frame Transport (QFT) reduces latency for smoother, lag-free gaming and real-time interactive virtual reality.

Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) automatically sets the ideal latency, allowing for smooth, lag-free and uninterrupted browsing and interactivity.

HDMI 2.1 Compliance Test Specification (CTS) will be published in stages during Q1-Q3 2018.

Do I need to buy a new Ultra High Speed ​​HDMI cable now?

Yes, but only if you have an 8K TV and plan to watch 8K content, which is currently only available on powerful computers. In all other cases, with the exception of 4K resolution at over 60 frames per second, which is also not yet available, existing* HDMI cables are sufficient.

Learn more about HDMI 2.1 and the new cables in HDMI 2.1: Everything you need to know

*for 2019

Do I need a dedicated HDMI2 cable?

Yes, I do. To transfer signals from 4K 100/120Hz to theoretically possible 10K, you need a new super high speed HDMI cable. This cable is called Ultra High Speed ​​HDMI®. These cables have been upgraded from 18 Gb/s to 48 Gb/s to unlock the full potential of the new HDMI 2.1 interface

Do I need a special «4K compatible» HDMI cable?

Depending on how good and how old your HDMI cables are, it may be necessary to upgrade your «4K compatible» cables. Normally, HDMI cables use all their data transfer capacity to the maximum, and for processing 4K/60Hz video signals, HDMI 2.0 performance has increased to the maximum capability from 10.2Gbps to 18Gbps. Current HDMI cables labeled «high speed» are capable of handling an increased range of 4K signals up to 8 meters in length. If you need a longer cable, we recommend an «active» type of HDMI cable such as HDMI fiber optic cable or 4K active HDMI cable. solutions and answers.

Different versions of HDMI can lead to some interoperability issues, for example you will generally not be able to get HDMI 1. 4 performance when using equipment and cables that are not 1.4 versions.
Also, some problems may arise due to the fault of the manufacturer, who has insufficiently or incorrectly performed the manufacturing technology. The incompatibility issue can also be encountered with HDCP digital copy protection code handshake and components connected with HDMI, especially when connected via an HDMI-equipped AV receiver in a home theater. If such problems are found, the HDMI Standards Group will contact the manufacturer and ask for a solution. In some cases, a product may be subject to a recall.

In addition to the initiating handshake, there are other reasons for incompatibility between components. At the beginning of the article, I mentioned that HDMI supports two-way communication between the video source and the TV. Part of this digital communication is called EDID (Extended Display Identification Data), and this data reveals the capabilities of the TV to the component source. The EDID information usually contains the manufacturer’s name, product type, screen resolution, color depth. Thanks to EDID, two devices not only communicate with each other, but also know with whom they communicate. All this gives the possibility of auto-configuration, which simplifies the setup process.
With all of this in mind, here are some of the most frequently asked HDMI connection questions from our customers, along with possible solutions and answers:

Long Distance HDMI Operation

video systems. One of the latest and greatest solutions is high speed HDMI fiber optic cables. These high-tech cables deliver superb picture and sound quality, including 4K and 3D content, at distances up to 300 meters, far beyond conventional copper cables. High speed cables work by converting HDMI electrical data into optical cables inside HDMI fiber optic connectors. The signals are converted back to an HDMI electrical data stream at the connection to your TV or projector. Since the cable is fiber, no signal loss occurs even over long distances, and it does not react to interference from other devices, wireless devices and computers.

Obtaining HDMI 1.4 specifications

No Audio Return Channel (ARC) from TV to AV receiver
Check that both the TV and the home theater AV receiver are equipped with HDMI 1.4 components and that they both support Audio Return Channel (ARC) ). It may surprise you, but most TVs with HDMI 1.4 inputs only support Audio Return Channel on one of these inputs. Next, make sure you are using an HDMI 1.3 or 1.4 cable. (Slightly confusing, hardware version 1.3 and below does not support the new HDMI 1.4 features; however, HDMI 1.3 cables do support some of them, namely Audio Return Channel.)

HDMI and 3D TV

When I turn on the 3D Blu-ray player to watch a movie, the TV display goes blank.
The problem seems to be that one of the components on your system does not support 3D video. For example, if you try to watch a movie through a 3D Blu-ray player on a TV that doesn’t display 3D, the TV doesn’t know what to do with the signal and its display goes blank.

The same can happen if you try to send a video signal through a 3D Blu-ray player to a home theater AV receiver that does not support 3D. The AV receiver is unable to transmit 3D video to your TV and the screen will be blank.
When you insert a Blu-ray disc, many 3D Blu-ray players require you to choose between 2D and 3D. If you select 3D, the player switches to 3D mode, you have very little time to confirm your choice. If you don’t confirm, the player assumes you can’t see the image and reverts back to 2D.

When I try to watch a normal 2D movie, my 3D TV screen goes blank.
If your TV is set to 3D video only, it will not receive a normal 2D signal. Enter the TV display menu, select “AUTO” (or something similar), which will instruct the TV display to accept incoming 2D or 3D signals, not just 3D.

General HDMI handshake issues

No sound or picture when using HDMI from a DVD player to a TV
Some video components are shipped from the factory with the HDMI output setting turned off. You can turn it on through the settings menu, or in some cases by pressing the HDMI button on the front panel or on the remote.

No sound when using HDTV HDMI input
Most TVs do not have built-in Dolby Digital decoded audio and DTS surround, and can only play 2-channel audio. But many HDMI-equipped video components come from the factory set to forward multi-channel audio. Usually changing the component’s audio setting to «2ch (PCM)» will solve the problem.

No picture when connecting cable box to HDTV
This is usually the fault of the cable box, as some cable vendors may not upgrade customers’ equipment with new software and cable boxes that are fully compatible with TVs equipped with HDMI and audio /video receivers. Buyers should report problems to local cable suppliers. Thus, when HDMI connection issues arise, one effective solution is to use component video connections and coaxial digital audio connections.

No subtitles on display when using HDMI connections
Unfortunately, the HDMI specification does not include the need to perform subtitle data transmission. Therefore, if you connect a component such as an HD cable or satellite receiver or DVD/Blu-ray player to your HDTV using HDMI, you will not see subtitles. If you want to see subtitles from your cable or satellite box, use the component’s video connection and you’ll get both subtitles and a high-definition picture.
An indirect problem may also be that most DVDs and Blu-ray discs are simply not encoded with HDMI compatible subtitles. In fact, a growing number of content providers are using some form of captioning called «Subtitles for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing» to help people with hearing disabilities. Even if not all discs are subtitled, usually all DVD and Blu-ray players are able to decode subtitles if they are.

No multichannel audio when connecting AV receiver to video source and HDTV.
We have already mentioned the two-way intelligence of HDMI linking components, but sometimes it merges into the problem of connecting the system. Typically, the display shows the video and audio capabilities of the video source. Virtually all televisions are limited to 2-channel audio playback*. Since most AV receivers use a «duplicate» type of HDMI switch, the AV receiver simply transmits 2-channel information to the source, unlike the capabilities of a multi-channel receiver. Thus, the player only sends 2-channel audio to the AV receiver, not high-quality surround sound.
One simple solution may be to simply use a separate optical or coaxial cable for the audio. Unfortunately, most HDMI-equipped components are designed to disable digital audio outputs when using the HDMI output. We’ve found that some models do this and some don’t (even those made by the same brand), and going forward, we hope to see more models that disable digital audio outputs.

Another HDMI audio issue related to the AV receiver: Some older HDMI-equipped AV receivers are not designed to carry audio over HDMI connections, they only pass through video. To receive multi-channel audio from these AV receivers, you need to connect an optical or coaxial digital cable from your video source to the receiver.