Intel core 2 duo performance chart: Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Benchmarks

Intel Core 2 Duo P7450 Benchmarks

Intel Core 2 Extreme Q9300

2.5 GHz (4 cores)

1171

 

Intel Core 2 Quad Q9100

2.3 GHz (4 cores)

991

 

Intel Core 2 Quad Q9000

2.0 GHz (4 cores)

913

 

Intel Core 2 Duo E8435

3.1 GHz (2 cores)

770

 

Intel Core 2 Extreme X9100

3.1 GHz (2 cores)

765

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9900

3.1 GHz (2 cores)

735

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9800

2.9 GHz (2 cores)

729

 

Intel Core 2 Extreme X9000

2.8 GHz (2 cores)

701

 

Intel Core 2 Duo E8235

2.8 GHz (2 cores)

662

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9600

2. 8 GHz (2 cores)

657

 

Intel Core 2 Duo E8135

2.7 GHz (2 cores)

654

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P9600

2.7 GHz (2 cores)

651

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9500

2.6 GHz (2 cores)

636

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P9700

2.8 GHz (2 cores)

630

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9550

2.7 GHz (2 cores)

613

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9300

2.5 GHz (2 cores)

607

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P9300

2.3 GHz (2 cores)

598

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P9500

2.5 GHz (2 cores)

594

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T9400

2.5 GHz (2 cores)

593

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P8700

2. 5 GHz (2 cores)

576

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P9400

2.4 GHz (2 cores)

571

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P8600

2.4 GHz (2 cores)

552

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P8400

2.3 GHz (2 cores)

528

 

Intel Core 2 Duo E8335

2.9 GHz (2 cores)

518

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T8300

2.4 GHz (2 cores)

509

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T6670

2.2 GHz (2 cores)

506

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P7370

2.0 GHz (2 cores)

496

 

Intel Core 2 Duo L9600

2.1 GHz (2 cores)

489

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T6500

2.1 GHz (2 cores)

480

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P7450

2. 1 GHz (2 cores)

475

 

Intel Core 2 Duo L9400

1.9 GHz (2 cores)

474

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T6600

2.2 GHz (2 cores)

471

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P7550

2.3 GHz (2 cores)

470

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T8100

2.1 GHz (2 cores)

469

 

Intel Pentium T4400

2.2 GHz (2 cores)

465

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P7350

2.0 GHz (2 cores)

462

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P8800

2.7 GHz (2 cores)

462

 

Intel Pentium T4500

2.3 GHz (2 cores)

458

 

Intel Celeron T3300

2.0 GHz (2 cores)

457

 

Intel Pentium T4300

2.1 GHz (2 cores)

457

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T6400

2. 0 GHz (2 cores)

447

 

Intel Celeron T3500

2.1 GHz (2 cores)

444

 

Intel Core 2 Duo T6570

2.1 GHz (2 cores)

437

 

Intel Pentium T4200

2.0 GHz (2 cores)

410

 

Intel Celeron T3100

1.9 GHz (2 cores)

401

 

Intel Celeron T3000

1.8 GHz (2 cores)

373

 

Intel Core 2 Duo U9600

1.6 GHz (2 cores)

348

 

Intel Core 2 Duo U9400

1.4 GHz (2 cores)

345

 

Intel Core 2 Duo U9300

1.2 GHz (2 cores)

337

 

Intel Core 2 Duo SU7300

1.3 GHz (2 cores)

328

 

Intel Pentium SU4100

1.3 GHz (2 cores)

326

 

Intel Core 2 Duo P7570

2. 3 GHz (2 cores)

305

 

Intel Celeron SU2300

1.2 GHz (2 cores)

277

 

Intel Celeron 925

2.3 GHz (1 core)

265

 

Intel Celeron 900

2.2 GHz (1 core)

253

 

Intel Core 2 Solo U3500

1.4 GHz (1 core)

181

 

Intel Celeron M ULV 743

1.3 GHz (1 core)

175

 

Intel Pentium SU2700

1.3 GHz (1 core)

171

 

CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy 2022: Processor Ranking Charts

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Our CPU benchmarks performance hierarchy ranks current and previous-gen Intel and AMD processors based on performance, including all of the Best CPUs for Gaming. Below the CPU ranking charts and tables, this guide also gives you a basic introduction to CPU benchmarking and includes a list of commonly-used CPU benchmark utilities.

Your CPU greatly affects overall performance and, to many, is a computer’s most important component. CPU benchmark comparisons help us sort out the differences, but when it comes time to buy a CPU for your desktop, you’ll find a dizzying collection of model numbers and specs from both Intel and AMD.

We’ve listed the best CPUs for gaming and best CPUs for workstations in other articles, but if you want to know how each chip stacks up against all the others and how we come to our decisions, this CPU benchmarks hierarchy is for you. If you’re looking for a broader view of the current state of the market, head to our AMD vs Intel feature for more CPU comparisons.

AMD also released its Ryzen 7000 processors this week, and we reviewed the Ryzen 9 7950X and Ryzen 5 7600X and have added those chips to the CPU benchmark rankings below. Intel also has its Raptor Lake, which the company says can boost up to 6GHz, due in mid-October. That means the leaders in our CPU benchmarks will change drastically over the coming month.

Keep your eye out for our update with the Ryzen 5 4600G, Ryzen 5 4500, and Ryzen 3 4100 as we fill out the lower-end of the CPU benchmark hierarchy. On the other end of the spectrum, we’ve added AMD’s fire-breathing 64-core 128-thread Threadripper Pro 5995WX to the charts with this latest update, along with the 32-core 64-thread Threadripper Pro 5975WX and 3975WX. These chips provide surprisingly strong performance in gaming, but they’re geared specifically for the workstation market. 

If you’re looking for the fastest gaming chip on the market across the broadest range of prices, Intel’s Alder Lake chips have taken the crown from AMD convincingly. However, AMD’s Ryzen 7 5800X3D takes the title as the fastest gaming CPU on the market and lives up to AMD’s claim that 3D V-Cache delivers an explosive increase in gaming performance, but isn’t as fast as in other types of work beyond gaming.

We’ll explain how we ranked the processors under each table. The game testing ranking is first. We also include an application performance metric, which we’ve split up into single- and multi-threaded measurements. We also have an integrated graphics CPU benchmark ranking so you can see how AMD’s APUs stack up to Intel’s lineup.

CPU Benchmarks Rankings 2022 — Windows 11

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Here are the current rankings for the Alder Lake chips compared to the Ryzen 5000 lineup in Windows 11, along with DDR4 vs DDR5 benchmarks and CPU overclock configurations. We also have a broader selection of tests below for Windows 10, so refer to those charts for a greater historical perspective.

We recently added the Zen 4 Ryzen 7000 CPUs to the hierarchy above. We tested the Ryzen 9 7950X and Ryzen 5 7600X with updated software and BIOS revisions, so these results are not directly comparable with our historical data. As such, we have the most important Ryzen and Intel SKUs in the first four charts, and then an additional four charts that have an expanded list of chips. 

CPU Benchmarks Rankings 2022 — Windows 10

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We conducted these tests in Windows 10, which penalizes the 12th-Gen Intel scores. This is because Windows 10 doesn’t target threads at the correct cores with the precision that we see in Windows 11 (typically, this doesn’t result in much performance loss, and you can use third-party freeware to fix the few issues). You can see the Windows 11 results in the album in the first album in the article.

We rank all the Intel and AMD processors in the tables below, but we don’t include CPU overclock performance rankings. You can see all of those numbers in the charts above. We’ve also added separate charts for integrated graphics testing.

Bear in mind that the charts above use the raw performance numbers, whereas our CPU benchmarks rankings below use a score to rank the chips relative to one another. Admittedly, the charts are getting a bit packed as we expand our rankings pool, but we’ll work to separate this out into different classes as our CPU benchmarks database grows. 

Gaming CPU Benchmarks Ranking 2022

Gaming CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy — Windows 10
1080p Gaming Score 1440p Gaming Score CPU Cores/Threads Base/Boost GHz TDP Buy
Intel Core i9-12900K DDR4 / DDR5 100% / 93.51% 100% / 95.86% Alder Lake 16 / 24 (8P+8E) 3.2 / 5.2 125 / 241W Core i9-12900K
Intel Core i9-11900K 92. 48% 97.26% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.5 / 5.3 125W Core i9-11900K
Intel Core i7-12700K DDR4 / DDR5 97.71% / 91.23% 99.8% / 97.30% Alder Lake 12 / 20 (8P+4E) 3.6 / 4.9 125 / 190W Core i7-12700K
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 90.98% 93.18% Zen 3 12 / 24 3.7 / 4.8 105W Ryzen 9 5900X
Intel Core i5-12600K DDR4 / DDR5 90.89% / 84.32% 96.94% / 92.33% Alder Lake 10 / 16 (6P+4E) 3.7 / 4.9 125 / 150W Core i5-12600K
AMD Ryzen 9 5950X 90.22% 95.32% Zen 3 16 / 32 3.4 / 4.9 105W Ryzen 9 5950X
AMD Threadripper Pro 5975WX 88.71% 89.71% Zen 3 32 / 64 3.6 / 4.5 280W
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 88.51% 91. 79% Zen 3 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.6 65W Ryzen 5 5600X
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 86.85% 91.72% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.8 / 4.7 105W Ryzen 7 5800X
Intel Core i7-11700K 86.3% 92.0% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.6 / 5.0 125W Core i7-11700K
AMD Threadripper Pro 5995WX 86.12% 84.79% Zen 3 64 / 128 2.7 / 4.5 280W
Intel Core i9-10900K 85.01% 91.5% Comet Lake 10 / 20 3.7 / 5.3 125W Core i9-9900K
Intel Core i9-10850K 84.6% 91.07% Comet Lake 10 / 20 3.6 / 5.2 95W Core i9-10850K
Intel Core i5-11600K 84.06% 90.43% Rocket Lake 6 / 12 3.9 / 4.9 125W Core i5-11600K
Intel Core i5-11400 80. 98% 87.77% Rocket Lake 6 / 12 2.6 / 4.4 65W Core i5-11400
Intel Core i7-10700K 80.66% 87.88% Comet Lake 8 / 16 3.8 / 5.1 125W Core i7-10700K
Intel Core i9-10980XE 78.04% 84.04% Cascade Lake-X 18 / 36 3.0 / 4.8 165W Core i9-10980XE
Intel W-3175X 76.93% 82.58% Skylake 28 / 56 3.1 / 4.3 225W @Newegg
Ryzen 7 5700G* 76.61% 83.1% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.8 / 4.6 65W N/A
Intel Core i9-9900KS 76.12% 84.85% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 16 4.0 / 5.0 127W Intel Core i9-9900KS
Intel Core i7-10700/F ~ ~ Comet Lake 8 / 16 2.9 / 4.8 65W Intel Core i7-10700
Intel Core i5-10600K 75. 42% 82.57% Comet Lake 6 / 12 4.1 / 4.8 125W @Newegg
Intel Core i7-9700K 73.62% 81.12% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 8 3.6 / 4.9 95W @Amazon
Intel Core i9-9900K / F 73.41% 84.85% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 16 3.6 / 5.0 95W Core i9-9900K
AMD Ryzen 9 3950X 72.63% 78.58% Zen 2 16 / 32 3.5 / 4.7 105W @Amazon
AMD Threadripper 3970X 72.44% 77.99% Zen 2 32 / 64 3.7 / 4.5 280W AMD Threadripper 3970X
AMD Threadripper 3960X 72.07% 77.12% Zen 2 24 / 48 3.8 / 4.5 280W AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3960X
AMD Ryzen 5 5600G 71.99% 76.76% Zen 3 6 / 12 3.9 / 4.4 65W Ryzen 5 5600G
AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT 71. 78% 79.28% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.7 105W @Newegg
AMD Threadripper 3990X 71.68% 77.94% Zen 2 64 / 128 2.9 / 4.3 280W AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X
AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT 71.67% 78.55% Zen 2 12 / 24 3.8 / 4.7 105W Ryzen 9 3900XT
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X ~ ~ Zen 2 12 / 24 3.8 / 4.6 105W @Amazon
Intel Core i9-9980XE ~ ~ Skylake 18 / 36 4.4 / 4.5 165W @B&HPhoto
AMD Ryzen 9 3900 ~ ~ Zen 2 12 / 24 3.1 / 4.3 105W OEM only
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 71.43% 79.08% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.4 65W Ryzen 7 3700X
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 71. 3% 78.67% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.5 105W Ryzen 7 3800X
AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT 70.62% 77.75% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.8 / 4.5 95W @Newegg
AMD Ryzen 5 3600 68.63% 75.59% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.2 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i9-7960X ~ ~ Skylake 16 / 32 2.8 / 4.2 165W @Newegg
Intel Core i7-8700K 68.47% 76.41% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.7 95W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 68.41% 75.60% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.8 / 4.4 95W @Newegg
AMD Threadripper Pro 3975WX 67.63% 74.42% Zen 2 32 / 64 3.5 / 4.2 280W
AMD Ryzen 3 3300X 67.49% 74. 6% Zen 2 4 / 8 3.8 / 4.3 65W @Newegg
Intel Core i5-9600K 67.06% 75.11% Coffee Lake-R 6 / 6 3.7 / 4.6 95W @Newegg
AMD Threadripper Pro 3995WX 66.18% 69.28% Zen 2 64 / 128 2.7 / 4.2 280W Threadripper Pro 3995WX
Intel Core i5-8600K 65.84% 73.4% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 3.6 / 4.3 95W @Newegg
Intel Core i7-8700 65.57% 73.66% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 3.2 / 4.6 65W Core i7-8700
Intel Core i7-8086K 65.05% 73.5% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 4.0 / 5.0 95W Core i7-8086K
Intel Core i5-9400 / i5-9400F 64.85% 72.08% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 2.9 / 4.1 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i5-8400 63. 96% 71.2% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 2.8 / 4.0 65W @Newegg
AMD Ryzen 5 3500X ~ ~ Zen 2 6 / 6 3.6 / 4.1 65W @Newegg
Core i3-10100 61.88% 69.08% Comet Lake 4 / 8 3.6 / 4.3 65W Core i3-10100
AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 59.19% 66.55% Zen+ 8 / 16 3.7 / 4.3 105W @Newegg
Ryzen 7 4750G* 58.43% 66.46% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.8 / 4.6 65W Ryzen 7 4750G
AMD Ryzen 3 3100 57.75% 64.21% Zen 2 4 / 8 3.8 / 3.9 65W @Newegg
Intel Core i9-7980XE ~ ~ Skylake 18 / 36 2.6 / 4.2 165W @Amazon
Intel Core i9-7900X ~ ~ Skylake 10 / 20 3. 3 / 4.3 140W @Newegg
AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 57.55% 65.33% Zen+ 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.2 95W @Amazon
Intel Core i7-7700K ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 8 4.2 / 4.5 91W @Amazon
AMD Threadripper 2990WX (GM) ~ ~ Zen+ 32 / 64 3.0 / 4.2 250W @Newegg
Intel Core i7-7820X ~ ~ Skylake 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.3 140W @Amazon
AMD Threadripper 2950X (GM) ~ ~ Zen + 16 / 32 3.5 / 4.4 180W @Amazon
AMD Threadripper 2970WX ~ ~ Zen + 24 / 48 3.0 / 4.2 250W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 7 2700 ~ ~ Zen+ 8 / 16 3.2 / 4.1 65W @Amazon
AMD Threadripper 1900X (GM) ~ ~ Zen 8 / 16 3. 8 / 4.0 180W @Amazon
Intel Core i7-7700 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 8 3.6 / 4.2 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 2600 ~ ~ Zen+ 6 / 12 3.4 / 3.9 65W @Newegg
Intel Core i7-7800X ~ ~ Skylake 6 / 12 3.5 / 4.0 140W @Newegg
Intel Core i5-7600K ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.8 / 4.2 91W @Amazon
AMD Threadripper 1950X (GM) ~ ~ Zen 16 / 32 3.4 / 4.0 180W @Newegg
AMD Threadripper 1920X (GM) ~ ~ Zen 12 / 24 3.5 / 4.0 180W @Amazon
Intel Core i3-9350KF 56.42% 65.19% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 4.0 / 4.6 91W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 3 5300G 55. 54% 62.68% Zen 3 4 / 8 4.0 / 4.2 65W OEM Only
AMD Ryzen 7 1800X 53.86% 60.83% Zen 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.0 95W @Newegg
Intel Core i5-7600 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.5 / 4.1 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i3-8100 ~ ~ Coffee Lake 4 / 4 3.6 / — 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i5-7500 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.4 / 3.8 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i5-7400 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.0 / 3.5 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 7 1700X ~ ~ Zen 8 / 16 3.8 / 3.9 95W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 1600AF ~ ~ Zen + 6 / 12 3.2 / 3. 6 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 7 1700 ~ ~ Zen 8 / 16 3.0 / 3.8 65W @Newegg
Intel Core i3-8350K 53.84% 61.82% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 4.0 / — 91W Core i3 i3-8350K
Intel Core i3-9100 51.96% 60.1% Coffee Lake-R 4 / 4 3.6 / 4.2 65W @Newegg
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X 49.99% 57.28% Zen 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.0 95W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 1600 ~ ~ Zen 6 / 12 3.2 / 3.6 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 3400G 48.81% 55.73% Zen + 4 / 8 3.7 / 4.2 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i5-7400 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.0 / 3.5 65W @Newegg
Intel Core i3-8100 48. 43% 59.7% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 3.6 / — 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 3 3200G 45.96% 52.98% Zen + 4 / 4 3.6 / 4.0 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 2400G 44.84% 50.67% Zen+ 4 / 8 3.6 / 3.9 65W @Newegg
AMD Ryzen 5 1500X ~ ~ Zen 4 / 8 3.5 / 3.7 65W @Newegg
Intel Core i3-7350K ~ ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 4.2 / — 60W @Newegg
Intel Pentium G5600 ~ ~ Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 54W @Newegg
AMD Ryzen 3 2200G 42.16% 48.56% Zen+ 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.7 65W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 3 1300X ~ ~ Zen 4 / 4 3. 5 / 3.7 65W @Amazon
Intel Core i3-7300 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 4.0 / — 51W @BH&Photo
Intel Pentium G5600 37.52% 44.7% Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 54W @Intel
Intel Pentium G5400 36.57% 43.31% Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.7 / — 54W @Amazon
Intel Core i3-7100 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 51W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 5 1400 ~ ~ Zen 4 / 8 3.2 / 3.4 65W @Amazon
Intel Pentium G4620 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.7 / — 54W @Newegg
Intel Pentium G4560 ~ ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.5 / — 54W @Newegg
AMD Athlon 3000G ~ ~ Zen+ 2 / 4 3. 5 / — 35W @Amazon
AMD Athlon 240GE ~ ~ Zen 2 / 4 3.5 / — 35W @Amazon
AMD Athlon 220GE ~ ~ Zen 2 / 4 3.4 / — 35W @Amazon
AMD Athlon 200GE ~ ~ Zen 2 / 4 3.2 / — 35W @Amazon
AMD Ryzen 3 1200 ~ ~ Zen 4 / 4 3.1 / 3.2 65W @Amazon
Zhaoxin KaiXian KX-U6780A ~ ~ LuJiaZui  8 / 8 2.7 / — 70W N/A
AMD A10-9700 ~ ~ Bristol Ridge 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.8 65W @Newegg

*indicates an APU tested with a discrete GPU. Note: These types of processors are geared for performance with integrated graphics — please see individual reviews or our section below for those performance rankings.

We’ve ranked all the Intel 12th, 11th, 10th, 9th, 8th, and 7th Gen processors, along with AMD’s Ryzen and Threadripper chips from all four generations. We have two rankings for each chip, based on 1080p and 1440p CPU gaming benchmarks. We conducted these tests in Windows 10 for compatibility purposes. You can see how the Windows 11 hierarchy looks in the slide show further above. The most powerful chip gets a 100, and all others are scored relative to it.

There’s a notable exception in our charts: The Threadripper Pro 5995WX, 5975WX, and 3975WX have slightly higher performance if we exclude two of the game titles that don’t seem to respond well to their architecture (Borderlands 3 and Far Cry 5). We’ve included those results in this measure to ensure compatibility with our library of results, but the chips score higher with those titles excluded. You can see what that looks like in our AMD Threadripper Pro 5995WX and 5975WX Review.

The chart is aligned in order based on the 1080p game results, but the 1440p listings aren’t listed in sequential order due to unfortunate limitations with our tables. Pay attention to the 1440p rankings: Some faster chips at 1440p CPU benchmarks may be listed below slower chips due to the 1080p results. You’ll also notice that the 12th-Gen Intel processors, like the 12900K, 12700K and 12600K, have two measurements for each entry — that’s to quantify performance with both DDR4 and DDR5 memory, with the former almost always offering better performance in Windows 10.

We measured performance for the 1080p CPU gaming benchmarks with a geometric mean of Borderlands 3, Hitman 2, Far Cry 5, Project CARS 3, Red Dead Redemption 2, and Shadow of the Tomb Raider. We measured performance for the 1440p CPU gaming benchmarks with a geometric mean of Borderlands 3, Project CARS 3, Far Cry 5, Red Dead Redemption 2, and Shadow of the Tomb Raider.

Integrated GPU Gaming CPU Benchmarks Rankings 2022

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iGPU Performance relative to Ryzen 7 5700G
1280×720 1920×1080
Ryzen 7 5700G B550-E 100% 100%
Ryzen 5 5600G 96. 3% 96%
Ryzen 7 4750G 92.9% 94.1%
Ryzen 3 5300G 85.8% 87.2%
Ryzen 5 3400G 83.5% 84.1%
Ryzen 3 3200G 77.1% 78.1%
Intel UHD Graphics 750 32 EU (11600K, 11700K) 58.3% ~48.9%
Intel UHD Graphics 730 24 EU (i5-11400) 51.7% 42.9%
Intel UHD Graphics 630 24 EU (10600K) 36.0% 34.4%

Here’s our list of gaming performance with integrated graphics on several of the leading APUs available. We’ve split this into two different price ranges, so be sure to flip through all of the performance charts. For a bit of commentary and analysis of these results, head to our Ryzen 7 5700G, Ryzen 5 5600G, and Ryzen 3 5300G reviews. The most powerful chip gets a 100, and all others are scored relative to it.

Single-Threaded CPU Benchmarks Rankings 2022

Single-Threaded CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy
Single-Threaded App Score Architecture Cores/Threads Base/Boost GHz TDP
Intel Core i9-11900K (ABT off/on) 100% / 99. 57% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.5 / 5.3 125W
AMD Ryzen 9 5950X 95.31% Zen 3 16 / 32 3.4 / 4.9 105W
Core i9-12900K DDR5 / DDR4 95.16% / 94.64% Alder Lake 16 / 24 (8P+8E) 3.2 / 5.2 125 / 241W
Core i7-11700K 94.29% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.6 / 5.0 95W
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 93.69% Zen 3 12 / 24 3.7 / 4.8 105W
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 92.84% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.8 / 4.7 105W
Intel Core i5-11600K 92.56% / 89.67% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.9 125W
Intel Core i7-12700K DDR5 / DDR4 91.60% Alder Lake 12 / 20 (8P+4E) 3.6 / 4.9 125W / 190W
AMD Threadripper Pro 5975WX 89.25% Zen 3 64 / 128 2. 7 / 4.5 280W
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 89.19% Zen 3 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.6 65W
Ryzen 7 5700G 88.92% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.4 65W
AMD Threadripper Pro 5995WX 88.48% Zen 3 64 / 128 3.6 / 4.5 280W
Core i5-12600K DDR4 / DDR5 87.85% / 87.82% Alder Lake 10 / 16 (6P+4E) 3.7 / 4.9 125 / 150W
Intel Core i9-10900K 86.68% Comet Lake 10 / 20 3.7 / 5.3 125W
AMD Ryzen 5 5600G 85.75% Zen 3 6 / 12 3.9 / 4.4 65W
Intel Core i9-10850K 84.87% Comet Lake 10 / 20 3.6 / 5.2 95W
Intel Core i9-9900KS 83.13% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 16 4.0 / 5.0 127W
Intel Core i5-11400 83. 09% Rocket Lake 6 / 12 2.6 / 4.4 65W
Intel Core i9-9900K 82.63% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 16 3.6 / 5.0 95W
Intel Core i7-10700K 82.31% Comet Lake 8 / 16 3.8 / 5.1 125W
AMD Ryzen 3 5300G 81.51% Zen 3 4 / 8 4.0 / 4.2 65W
Intel Core i7-9700K 80.36% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 8 3.6 / 4.9 95W
AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT 79.75% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.7 105W
AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT 79.11% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.8 / 4.5 95W
AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT 78.86% Zen 2 12 / 24 3.8 / 4.7 105W
Intel Core i5-10600K 78.79% Comet Lake 6 / 12 4.1 / 4. 125W
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 78. 37% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.5 105W
AMD Ryzen 9 3950X 78.18% Zen 2 16 / 32 3.5 / 4.7 105W
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 77.68% Zen 2 12 / 24 3.8 / 4.6 105W
Intel Core i7-10700/F ~ Comet Lake 8 / 16 2.9 / 4.8 65W
Ryzen 7 4750G 77.2% Zen 3 8 /16 3.6 / 4.4 65W
AMD Threadripper 3970X 76.52% Zen 2 32 / 64 3.7 / 4.5 280W
AMD Threadripper 3960X 76.42% Zen 2 24 / 48 3.8 / 4.5 280W
AMD Threadripper Pro 3975WX 76.36% Zen 2 32 / 64 3.5 / 4.2 280W
Intel Core i7-8700K 76.32% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.7 95W
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 76. 29% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.4 65W
Intel Core i7-8086K 76.21% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 4.0 / 5.0 95W
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 75.85% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.8 / 4.4 95W
Intel Core i3-9350KF 75.72% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 4.0 / 4.6 91W
AMD Ryzen 3 3300X 75.62% Zen 2 4 / 8 3.8 / 4.3 65W
Intel Core i5-9600K 75.41% Coffee Lake-R 6 / 6 3.7 / 4.6 95W
Intel Core i9-10980XE 75.24% Cascade Lake-X 18 / 36 3.0 / 4.8 165W
AMD Threadripper 3990X 75.10% Zen 2 64 / 128 2.9 / 4.3 280W
Intel Core i7-8700 74.66% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 3.2 / 4.6 65W
AMD Threadripper Pro 3995WX 74. 20% Zen 2 64 / 128 2.7 / 4.2 280W
AMD Ryzen 5 3600 73.02% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.2 65W
Intel Core i9-9980XE ~ Skylake 18 / 36 4.4 / 4.5 165W
Intel Core i7-7700K ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 8 4.2 / 4.5 91W
Intel Core i5-8600K 71.08% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 3.6 / 4.3 95W
Core i3-10100 70.80% Coffee Lake 4 / 8 3.6 / 4.3 65W
AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 69.53% Zen+ 8 / 16 3.7 / 4.3 105W
Intel Core i3-9100 69.20% Coffee Lake-R 4 / 4 3.6 / 4.2 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 3100 67.74% Zen 2 4 / 8 3.8 / 3.9 65W
Intel Core i5-9400 / -9400F 67. 67% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 2.9 / 4.1 65W
Intel Xeon W-3175X 67.51% Skylake 28 / 56 3.1 / 3.8 225W
AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 66.78% Zen+ 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.2 95W
Intel Core i3-8350K / -8350KF 66.71% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 4.0 / — 91W
Intel Core i5-8400 66.03% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 2.8 / 4.0 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 3500X ~ Zen 2 6 / 6 3.6 / 4.1 65W
AMD Ryzen 9 3900 ~ Zen 2 12 / 24 3.1 / 4.3 65W
Intel Core i3-7100 ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 51W
AMD Threadripper 2950X ~ Zen + 16 / 32 3.5 / 4.4 180W
AMD Threadripper 2990WX ~ Zen+ 32 / 64 3. 0 / 4.2 250W
AMD Threadripper 2970WX ~ Zen + 24 / 48 3.0 / 4.2 250W
AMD Ryzen 5 3400G 64.86% Zen + 4 / 8 3.7 / 4.2 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X 63.62% Zen 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.0 95W
AMD Ryzen 7 1800X 61.99% Zen 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.0 95W
Intel Core i5-7400 ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.0 / 3.5 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 3200G 60.90% Zen + 4 / 4 3.6 / 4.0 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 2400G 60.79% Zen+ 4 / 8 3.6 / 3.9 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 1300X ~ Zen 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.7 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 1600AF ~ Zen 6 / 12 3.2 / 3.6 65W
Intel Pentium G5600 60. 13% Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 54W
Intel Core i3-8100 60.12% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 3.6 / — 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 2200G 57.09% Zen 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.7 65W
Intel Pentium G5400 56.79% Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.7 / — 54W
AMD Athlon 3000G ~ Zen+ 2 / 4 3.5 / — 35W
AMD Athlon 220GE ~ Zen 2 / 4 3.4 / — 35W
Intel Pentium G4560 ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.5 / — 54W
AMD Athlon 200GE ~ Zen 2 / 4 3.2 / — 35W
AMD A10-9700 ~ Bristol Ridge 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.8 65W
Zhaoxin KaiXian KX-U6780A ~ LuJiaZui  8 / 8 2. 7 / — 70W

We calculate the above single-threaded CPU benchmarks rankings based on a geometric mean of the Cinebench, POV-Ray, and LAME CPU benchmarks. The most powerful chip gets a 100, and all others are scored relative to it.

We conducted these tests in Windows 10, which penalizes the 12th-Gen Intel scores. This is because Windows 10 doesn’t target threads at the correct cores with the precision that we see in Windows 11. You can see the Windows 11 results in the album in the first album in the article, but suffice it to say that Alder Lake chips, like the Core i7-12900K, 12700K and 12600K, lead by large margins in Windows 11.

Single-threaded performance is often tied directly to the responsiveness and snappiness of your PC in any number of daily applications, like loading an operating system or surfing the web. This metric largely depends upon a mixture of instruction per cycle (IPC) throughput (the number of operations the chip can execute in one clock cycle) and frequency, which is the speed at which the transistors switch between on and off states.

However, a whole host of other considerations, such as cache, architecture, and interconnects (like rings, meshes, and infinity fabric) impact this measure of per-core performance, so these results do not align perfectly based upon clock frequency. Instead, performance varies with each application and how well it is tuned for the respective architectures.

Multi-Threaded CPU Benchmarks Rankings 2022

Multi-Threaded CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy
Multi-Threaded App Score Architecture Cores/Threads Base/Boost GHz TDP
AMD Threadripper Pro 5995WX 112.53% Zen 3 64 / 128 2.7 / 4.5 280W
AMD Threadripper 3990X 100.0% Zen 2 64 / 128 2.9 / 4.3 280W
AMD Threadripper Pro 3995WX 97.59% Zen 2 64 / 128 2.7 / 4.2 280W
AMD Threadripper Pro 5975WX 93. 14% Zen 3 32 / 64 3.6 / 4.5 280W
AMD Threadripper Pro 3975WX 82.59% Zen 2 32 / 64 3.5 / 4.2 280W
AMD Threadripper 3970X 75.74% Zen 2 32 / 64 3.7 / 4.5 280W
AMD Threadripper 3960X 64.76% Zen 2 24 / 48 3.8 / 4.5 280W
Intel Xeon W-3175X 59.95% Skylake 28 / 56 3.1 / 4.3 225W
AMD Ryzen 9 5950X 53.58% Zen 3 16 / 32 3.4 / 4.9 105W
AMD Ryzen 9 3950X 47.32% Zen 2 16 / 32 3.5 / 4.7 105W
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 45.89% Zen 3 12 / 24 3.7 / 4.8 105W
Intel Core i9-10980XE 43.06% Cascade Lake-X 18 / 36 3.0 / 4.8 165W
Intel Core i9-9980XE ~ Skylake 18 / 36 4. 4 / 4.5 165W
AMD Threadripper 2990WX ~ Zen+ 32 / 64 3.0 / 4.2 250W
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 38.69% Zen 2 12 / 24 3.8 / 4.6 105W
AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT 38.66% Zen 2 12 / 24 3.8 / 4.7 105W
Core i9-12900K DDR4 / DDR5 38.39% / 38.11% Alder Lake 16 / 24 (8P+8E) 3.2 / 5.2 125 / 241W
Intel Core i9-11900K (ABT off/on) 36.01% / 37.07% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.5 / 5.3 125W
AMD Threadripper 2970WX ~ Zen + 24 / 48 3.0 / 4.2 250W
Core i7-11700K 34.26% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.6 / 5.0 125W
Intel Core i9-10900K 33.79% Comet Lake 10 / 20 3.7 / 5.3 125W
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 33. 48% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.8 / 4.7 105W
Intel Core i9-10850K 33.38% Comet Lake 10 / 20 3.6 / 5.2 95W
AMD Threadripper 2950X ~ Zen + 16 / 32 3.5 / 4.4 180W
AMD Ryzen 9 3900 ~ Zen 2 12 / 24 3.1 / 4.3 65W
Ryzen 7 5700G 29.73% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.8 / 4.6 65W
Intel Core i9-9900KS 29.11% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 16 4.0 / 5.0 127W
Core i7-12700K DDR5 / DDR4 28.77% / 28.77% Alder Lake 12 / 20 (8P+4E) 2.7 / 3.8 125 / 190W
AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT 28.49% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.7 105W
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 28.25% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.5 105W
Intel Core i7-10700K 28. 17% Comet Lake 8 / 16 3.8 / 5.1 125W
Intel Core i9-9900K 27.78% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 16 3.6 / 5.0 95W
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 27.47% Zen 2 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.4 65W
Intel Core i5-11600K 26.79% Rocket Lake 8 / 16 3.9 / 4.9 125W
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 26.15% Zen 3 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.6 65W
AMD Ryzen 7 4750G 26.06% Zen 3 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.4 65W
Intel Core i7-10700/F ~ Comet Lake 8 / 16 2.9 / 4.8 65W
Intel Core i5-11400 24.46% Rocket Lake 6 / 12 2.6 / 4.4 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 5600G 23.33% Zen 3 6 / 12 3.9 / 4.4 65W
Core i5-12600K DDR4 / DDR5 2308% / 23. 07% Alder Lake 10 / 16 (6P+4E) 3.7 / 4.9 125 / 150W
Intel Core i7-9700K 22.81% Coffee Lake-R 8 / 8 3.6 / 4.9 95W
AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT 22.28% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.8 / 4.5 95W
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 21.76% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.8 / 4.4 95W
AMD Ryzen 5 3600 21.41% Zen 2 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.2 65W
AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 21.59% Zen+ 8 / 16 3.7 / 4.3 105W
Intel Core i5-10600K 20.83% Comet Lake 6 / 12 4.1 / 4.8 125W
Intel Core i7-8700K 20.23% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.7 95W
Core i7-8700 20.04% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 3.2 / 4.6 65W
Core i7-8086K 19. 30% Coffee Lake 6 / 12 4.0 / 5.0 95W
AMD Ryzen 7 1800X 19.17% Zen 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.0 95W
AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 16.96% Zen+ 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.2 95W
Intel Core i5-9600K 16.60% Coffee Lake-R 6 / 6 3.7 / 4.6 95W
AMD Ryzen 5 3500X ~ Zen 2 6 / 6 3.6 / 4.1 65W
Intel Core i7-7700K ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 8 4.2 / 4.5 91W
Intel Core i5-8600K 15.93% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 3.6 / 4.3 95W
AMD Ryzen 3 5300G 15.83% Zen 3 4 / 8 4.0 / 4.2 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 3300X 15.55% Zen 2 4 / 8 3.8 / 4.3 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 1600AF ~ Zen 6 / 12 3. 2 / 3.6 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X 15.16% Zen 6 / 12 3.6 / 4.0 95W
Intel Core i5-9400 / -9400F 15.04% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 2.9 / 4.1 65W
Intel Core i5-8400 14.76% Coffee Lake 6 / 6 2.8 / 4.0 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 3100 14.17% Zen 2 4 / 8 3.8 / 3.9 65W
Core i3-10100 13.37% Rocket Lake 4 / 8 3.6 / 4.3 65W
Intel Core i3-9350KF 11.76% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 4.0/4.6 91W
AMD Ryzen 5 3400G 11.31% Zen + 4 / 8 3.7 / 4.2 65W
Intel Core i3-8350K 10.74% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 4.0 / — 91W
Intel Core i3-9100 10.70% Coffee Lake-R 4 / 4 3. 6 / 4.2 65W
AMD Ryzen 5 2400G 10.56% Zen+ 4 / 8 3.6 / 3.9 65W
Intel Core i3-8100 9.61% Coffee Lake 4 / 4 3.6 / — 65W
Intel Core i5-7400 ~ Kaby Lake 4 / 4 3.0 / 3.5 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 3200G 8.66% Zen + 4 / 4 3.6 / 4.0 65W
AMD Ryzen 3 1300X ~ Zen 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.7 65W
Intel Core i3-7100 ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 51W
AMD Ryzen 3 2200G 7.99% Zen 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.7 65W
Intel Pentium G5600 5.43% Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.9 / — 54W
AMD Athlon 3000G ~ Zen+ 2 / 4 3.5 / — 35W
AMD Athlon 220GE ~ Zen 2 / 4 3. 4 / — 35W
Intel Pentium G5400 5.13% Coffee Lake 2 / 4 3.7 / — 54W
AMD Athlon 200GE ~ Zen 2 / 4 3.2 / — 35W
Intel Pentium G4560 ~ Kaby Lake 2 / 4 3.5 / — 54W
AMD A10-9700 ~ Bristol Ridge 4 / 4 3.5 / 3.8 65W
Zhaoxin KaiXian KX-U6780A ~ LuJiaZui  8 / 8 2.7 / — 70W

The multi-threaded workload column is based on CPU benchmarks performance in Cinebench, POV-ray, vray, Blender (four tests — Koro, Barcellona, Classroom, bmw27), y-cruncher, and Handbrake x264 and x265 workloads. These CPU benchmarks represent performance in productivity-focused applications that tend to require more compute horsepower. The most powerful chip gets a 100, and all others are scored relative to it.

We conducted these tests in Windows 10, which penalizes the 12th-Gen Intel scores. This is because Windows 10 doesn’t target threads at the correct cores with the precision that we see in Windows 11. You can see the Windows 11 results in the album in the first album in the article, but suffice it to say that Alder Lake chips, like the Core i7-12900K, 12700K and 12600K, perform much better in Windows 11.

Like we see with single-threaded performance metrics, multi-threaded performance, which is a measure of a chip’s performance in applications that utilize multiple software threads, varies based upon a whole host of architectural factors. It also depends heavily upon how well the software scales with additional compute cores. As such, these results do not align perfectly based upon core/thread count, though it does serve as a decent litmus of multi-threaded performance. 

Be aware that architectures, caches, and interconnects profoundly impact these results, as all of these factors impact how well performance scales with additional threads. Performance rarely scales perfectly with the addition of more cores/threads, so the scaling factor of each processor architecture weighs in heavily on the value proposition of going with a higher core count processor.

How to Benchmark your CPU

Benchmarking your CPU is also an essential practice for CPU overclocking or merely tuning your system. Simply run a CPU benchmark before you make any changes, then re-test after changes to see the results. You can head to our deep-dive details of overclocking in our How to Overclock a CPU guide.

How do you benchmark your CPU? Well, that’s not as complicated as you might think. Choosing the best CPU benchmarks can be a daunting task, but the general rule is that the best performance benchmark is simply measuring the performance of the programs you use the most. So naturally, simply due to a lack of comparable test results, these real-world benchmarks might not give you a means of comparing your performance to other CPUs.

However, if the programs you frequently use don’t have built-in benchmarks you can also use similar types of programs (renderers or encoders, for instance) as a proxy for your workload. There’s also a selection of well-known benchmarks with large databases for easy comparisons. You can also compare your results to the benchmarks you see in our library of reviews to get a good sense of how your system stacks up. We’ll list out some great application benchmarks with download links below.

These same theories apply to CPU game benchmarking — the best CPU benchmark is the game that you play the most. You can download an fps counter, like FRAPS, to measure performance during your gaming session. Games can vary widely, so we don’t have a specific list of titles to test, but you can simply use the gaming CPU benchmarks you see in our reviews as a good starting point.

You can also use synthetic gaming CPU benchmarks, a few of which we have listed below. Just be aware that these synthetic CPU benchmarks don’t tend to translate well to real-world gaming, but they do show us the raw amount of compute power exposed to game engines. However, given their stability and repeatability, these are great benchmarks for comparing performance before and after any changes you may make to your system.  

Most often overlook web-browser performance, but these are among the best CPU benchmarks to measure performance in single-threaded workloads, which helps quantify the snappiness in your system and correlates to performance in games that prize single-threaded performance. We’ve included a few web browser benchmarks below as well.

If you plan to compare to other gaming and application CPU benchmark results from reviews, forums, or friends, be sure to turn off as many background tasks as possible during your benchmarks to eliminate that influence from your CPU benchmark results. Here’s a list with download links for some of the most common CPU benchmarks:

Best CPU Benchmarks You Can Run

  • Cinebench R23 (MS Store ) — This rendering CPU benchmark program has both single- and multi-core benchmark modes. This is one of the most commonly-used CPU benchmarks. 
  • UL Benchmarks 3DMark — This synthetic CPU benchmark has a plethora of built-in tests for both CPUs and GPUs and is updated regularly with new tests. This is the go-to synthetic gaming test for many. 
  • CPU-Z — This is a common utility that exposes the details of your processor, but it also has a built-in CPU benchmark that is incredibly simple to run. The single- and multi-thread test results don’t correlate well to real-world tasks, but the tests’ stability makes them well suited for before and after comparisons. CPU-Z test results are also widely shared among enthusiasts, so it’s easy to find comparison systems. 
  • POV-Ray — This rendering CPU benchmark has both single- and multi-threaded test options but uses a heavier distribution of AVX instructions than Cinebench to create a taxing CPU benchmark. 
  • C-Ray — This CPU benchmark uses a raytracer rendering engine to measure a CPU’s multi-threaded performance in floating-point operations. 
  • HandBrake — The HandBrake encoder comes with a plethora of options, so you can easily tailor the encoding CPU benchmark to your needs. Simply measure the amount of time it takes to encode a video, and then use that as your baseline for comparison.  
  • Corona — This is another popular rendering utility and is a simple-one click CPU benchmark that uses the Chaos Corona render engine to measure CPU performance in multi-threaded workloads. 
  • WebXPRT 4 — This is a click-to-run CPU benchmark that runs in your browser to measure performance in HTML5, JavaScript, and WebAssembly-based tests. This is a great CPU benchmark to measure single-threaded performance.  
  • ARES-6 — This is a click-to-run CPU benchmark that runs in your browser to measure performance in JavaScript but has a heavy weighting towards the neural network (machine learning) workloads that are becoming increasingly common. This is a great CPU benchmark to measure single-threaded performance.
  • y-cruncher — This CPU benchmark runs from a command line, so it isn’t the most user-friendly. However, it calculates Pi using the latest AVX instruction sets in a heavily-threaded manner, making it among the best to measure SIMD performance. Beware, this test can break overclocks easily (which also means it is great for stress testing).  

CPU Benchmarks Test System and Configuration 2022

CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy Test Setup
Hardware
AMD Socket AM4 (400- 500-Series) AMD Ryzen 2000- 3000- 5000- series processors
MSI MEG X570 Godlike
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600
Intel LGA 1151 (Z490) Intel Comet Lake processors
MSI Z370 Gaming Pro Carbon AC
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600
AMD Socket AM4 (300-Series) Ryzen 1000-series processors
MSI X370 Xpower Gaming Titanium
2x 8GB G.Skill FlareX DDR4-3200 @ DDR4-2667
Intel LGA 1151 (Z270) Intel Coffee Lake, Kaby Lake processors
MSI Z270 Gaming M7
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600
Intel LGA 2066 Intel Skylake processors
MSI X299 Gaming Pro Carbon AC
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600
All Gigabyte GeForce RTX 3090 Eagle
2TB Intel DC4510 SSD
EVGA Supernova 1600 T2, 1600W
Windows 10 Pro version 2004 (build 19041. 450)
Cooling Corsair h215i

Legacy Desktop CPU Benchmarks

Recognizing that a lot of older platforms are going to be paired with graphics subsystems multiple generations old, we wanted to define the top of our range to encourage balance between host processing and complementary GPUs. At this point, anyone with a Sandy Bridge-based Core i7 would realize a gain from stepping up to Coffee Lake or Kaby Lake, for example. And putting AMD’s top FX CPUs next to a handful of Core i7s and those older Core i5s represents an upgrade to their status.

Currently, our hierarchy consists of 13 total tiers. The bottom half of the chart is largely outdated; you’ll notice those CPUs dragging down performance in the latest games, whether you have one of the best graphics cards or not. If you own a CPU in that range, an upgrade could really take your experience to another level.

Really, it’s the top five tiers or so that remain viable. And in that top half of the chart, an upgrade is typically worthwhile if it’s a least a couple of tiers higher. Otherwise, there’s just not enough improvement to warrant the expense of a fresh CPU, motherboard and RAM (not to mention the graphics card and storage solution you’d be considering as well). 

Legacy Desktop CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Core i7-8700K
Intel Core i9-7900X
Intel Core i9-7960X
Intel Core i9-7980XE
Intel Core i7-8700K
Intel Core i7-7740X
Intel Core i7-7700K
Intel Core i7-7820X AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X
Intel Core i7-7700 AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X
Intel Core i5-8400 AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
Intel Core i7-7800X AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X
Intel Core i7-7700T AMD Ryzen 7 1700X
Intel Core i7-6950X AMD Ryzen 7 1700
Intel Core i7-6900K AMD Ryzen 5 1600X
Intel Core i7-6850K AMD Ryzen 5 1600
Intel Core i7-6800K AMD Ryzen 5 1500X
Intel Core i7-6700K AMD Ryzen 5 1400
Intel Core i7 6700 AMD Ryzen 3 1300X
Intel Core i7-5960X Ryzen 5 2400G
Intel Core i7-5930K
Intel Core i7-5820K
Intel Core i7-5775C
Intel i7-4960X
Intel Core i7-4930K
Intel Core i7-4820K
Intel Core i7-4790K
Intel Core i7-4770K
Intel Core i7-4790
Intel Core i7-4771
Intel Core i7-4770
Intel Core i7-3970X
Intel Core i7-3960X
Intel Core i7-3930K
Intel Core i7-3820
Intel Core i7-3770K
Intel Core i7-3770
Intel Core i5-7640X
Intel Core i5-7600K
Intel Core i5-7600
Intel Core i5-7500
Intel Core i5-7400
Intel Core i5 6600K
Intel Core i5-6600
Intel Core i5-6500
Intel Core i5 6402P
Intel Core i5-6400
Intel Core i5-5675C
Intel Core i5-4690K
Intel Core i5-4670K
Intel Core i5-4590
Intel Core i5-4670
Intel Core i5-4570
Intel BX80646I54460
Intel Core i5-4440
Intel Core i5-4430
Intel Core i5-3570K
Intel Core i5-3570
Intel Core i5-3550
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Core i7-990X Extreme
Intel Core i7-980X Extreme
Intel Core i7-975 Extreme
Intel Core i7-2600K
Intel Core i7-2600
Intel Core i7-965
Intel Core i5-3470
Intel Core i5-3450P Intel Core i7-7700
Intel Core i5-3450 AMD FX-9370
Intel Core i5-3350P AMD FX-8370
Intel Core i5-3330 AMD FX-8350 w/Wraith
Intel Core i5-2550K AMD FX-8320
Intel Core i5-2500K AMD FX-8300
Intel Core i5-2500 AMD FX-8150
Intel Core i5-2450P
Intel Core i5-2400
Intel Core i5-2380P
Intel Core i5-2320
Intel Core i5-2310
Intel Core i5-2300
Intel Core i3-7350K
Intel Core i3-7320
Intel Core i3-7300
Intel Core i3-7100
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Core i7-980
Intel Core i7-970
Intel Core i7-960
Intel Core i7-875K
Intel Core i7-870
Intel Core i3 6320
Intel Core i3 6300
Intel Core i3-6100 AMD FX-6350
Intel Core i3 6100T AMD FX-4350
Intel Core i3-6098P AMD Phenom II X6 1100T Black Edition
Intel Core i3-4360 AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition
Intel Core i3-4350 AMD Phenom II X4 Black Edition 980
Intel Core i3-4340 AMD Phenom II X4 Black Edition 975
Intel Core i3-4170
Intel Core i3-4160
Intel Core i3-4150
Intel Core i3-4130
Intel Core i3-3250
Intel Core i3-3245
Intel Core i3-3240
Intel Core i3-3225
Intel Core i3-3220
Intel Core i3-3210
Intel Core i3-2130
Intel Core i3-2025
Intel Core i3-2120
Intel Core i3-2105
Intel Core i3-2100
Intel Pentium G4620
Intel Pentium G4600
Intel Pentium G4560
Intel Pentium G4500
Intel Pentium G4400
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
AMD FX-8370E
AMD FX-8320
AMD FX-8120
AMD FX-6300
AMD FX-6200
AMD FX-4300
AMD FX-4170
AMD Phenom II X6 1075T
Intel Core i7-950 AMD Phenom II X4 970 Black Edition
Intel Core i7-940 AMD Phenom II X4 965
Intel Core i7-930 AMD Phenom II X4 955
Intel Core i7-920 AMD A10-7890K APU
Intel Core i7-860 Intel A10-7870K
Intel Core i5-3220T AMD A10-7860K
Intel Core i5-2405S AMD A10-7850K
Intel Core i5-2400S AMD A10-7800
Intel Core i5-760 AMD A10-7700K
Intel Core i5-750 AMD A10-6800K
Intel Core 2 Extreme QX9775 AMD A10-6790K
Intel Core 2 Extreme QX9770 AMD A10-6700
Intel Core 2 Extreme QX9650 AMD A10-5800K
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9650 AMD A10-5700
Intel A8-7650K
AMD A8-7600
AMD A8-6600K
AMD A8-5600K
AMD A8-3870K
AMD A8-3870
AMD A8-3850
AMD Athlon X4 880K
Intel Athlon X4 870K)
Intel A10-7870K
AMD Athlon X4 750K
AMD Athlon X4 740
AMD Athlon X4 651K
AMD Athlon X4 645
AMD Athlon X4 641
AMD Athlon X4 640
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
AMD FX-6100
AMD FX-4130
AMD FX-4100
Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6850 AMD Phenom II X6 1055T
Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6800 AMD Phenom II X6 1045T
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 AMD Phenom II X4 945
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450 AMD Phenom II X4 940
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9400 AMD Phenom II X4 920
Intel Core i5-680 AMD Phenom II X3 740
Intel Core i5-670 AMD Phenom II X3 720 Black Edition
Intel Core i5-661 AMD A8-6500
Intel Core i5-660 AMD A8-5500
Intel Core i5-655K AMD A6
Intel Core i5-650 AMD A6
Intel Core i3-2120T AMD A6-3670K
Intel Core i3-2100T AMD A6-3650
AMD Athlon II X4 635
AMD Athlon II X4 630
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6700
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9300
Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400
Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6700
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600
Intel Core 2 Duo E8600
Intel Core 2 Duo E8500 AMD Phenom II X4 910
Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 AMD Phenom II X4 910e
Intel Core 2 Duo E7600 AMD Phenom II X4 810
Intel Core i3-550 AMD Athlon II X4 631
Intel Core i3-540 AMD Athlon II X4 620
Intel Core i3-530 AMD Athlon II X3 460
Intel Pentium G3470
Intel Pentium G3460
Intel Pentium G3450
Intel Pentium G3440
Intel Pentium G3430
Intel Pentium G3420
Intel Pentium G3260
Intel Pentium G3258
Intel Pentium G3250
Intel Pentium G3220
Intel Pentium G2130
Intel Pentium G2120
Intel Pentium G2020
Intel Pentium G2010
Intel Pentium G870
Intel Pentium G860
Intel Pentium G850
Intel Pentium G840
Intel Pentium G645
Intel Pentium G640
Intel Pentium G630
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Core 2 Extreme X6800
Intel Core 2 Quad Q8200
Intel Core 2 Duo E8300 AMD Phenom II X4 905e
Intel Core 2 Duo E8200 AMD Phenom II X4 805
Intel Core 2 Duo E8190 AMD Phenom II X3 710
Intel Core 2 Duo E7500 AMD Phenom II X3 705e
Intel Core 2 Duo E7400 AMD Phenom II X2 565 Black Edition
Intel Core 2 Duo E6850 AMD Phenom II X2 560 Black Edition
Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 AMD Phenom II X2 555 Black Edition
Intel Pentium G620 AMD Phenom II X2 550 Black Edition
Intel Celeron G1630 AMD Phenom II X2 545
Intel Celeron G1620 AMD Phenom X4 9950
Intel Celeron G1610 AMD Athlon II X3 455
Intel Celeron G555 AMD Athlon II X3 450
Intel Celeron G550 AMD Athlon II X3 445
Intel Celeron G540 AMD Athlon II X3 440
Intel Celeron G530 AMD Athlon II X3 435
Intel Celeron G3950 AMD Athlon II X3 425
Intel Celeron G3930
Intel Celeron G3930
Intel Celeron G3900
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
AMD Phenom X4 9850
AMD Phenom X4 9750
AMD Phenom X4 9650
Intel Core 2 Duo E7300 AMD Phenom X4 9600
Intel Core 2 Duo E7200 AMD Phenom X3 8850
Intel Core 2 Duo E6700 AMD Phenom X3 8750
Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 AMD Athlon II X2 370K
Intel Core 2 Duo E6540 AMD Athlon II X2 265
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E6700 AMD Athlon II X2 260
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E6600 AMD Athlon II X2 255
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E650 AMD A6-5500K
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E6300 AMD A6
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E5800 AMD A4-7300
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E5700 AMD A4-6400K
Intel Pentium G9650 AMD A4-6300
AMD A4-5400K
AMD A4-5300
AMD A4-4400
AMD A4-4000
AMD A4-3400
AMD A4-3300
AMD Sempron 2650
AMD Athlon 64 X2 6400+
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
AMD Phenom X4 9550
AMD Phenom X4 9500
AMD Phenom X4 9450e
Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 AMD Phenom X4 9350e
Intel Core 2 Duo E6420 AMD Phenom X3 8650
Intel Core 2 Duo E4700 AMD Phenom X3 8600
Intel Core 2 Duo E4600 AMD Phenom X3 8550
Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 AMD Phenom X3 8450e
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E5400 AMD Phenom X3 8450
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E5300 AMD Phenom X3 8400
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E5200 AMD Phenom X3 8250e
Intel Pentium Dual-Core G620T AMD Athlon II X2 250
AMD Athlon II X2 245
AMD Athlon II X2 240
AMD Athlon X2 7850
AMD Athlon X2 7750
AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600+
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
AMD Phenom X4 9150e
AMD Phenom X4 9100e
Intel Core 2 Duo E6400 AMD Athlon X2 7550
Intel Core 2 Duo E6320 AMD Athlon X2 7450
Intel Core 2 Duo E4400 AMD Athlon X2 5050e
Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 AMD Athlon X2 4850e/b
Intel Celeron E3300 AMD Athlon 64 X2 5400+
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5200+
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5000+
AMD Athlon 64 X2 4800+
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 AMD Athlon X2 6550
Intel Core 2 Duo E5500 AMD Athlon X2 6500
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2220 AMD Athlon X2 4450e/b
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2200 AMD Athlon X2 4600+
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2210 AMD Athlon X2 4400+
Intel Celeron E3200 AMD Athlon X2 4200+
AMD Athlon X2 BE-2400
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2180 AMD Athlon 64 X2 4000+
Intel Celeron 1600 AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+
Intel Celeron G440 AMD Athlon X2 4050e
AMD Athlon X2 2300 Black Edition
Intel CPUs AMD CPUs and APUs
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2160
Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2140
Intel Celeron E1500
Intel Celeron E1400
Intel Celeron E1200
  • Ryzen 7 5800X3D vs Core i7-12700K and Core i9-12900K Face-Off: The Rise of 3D V-Cache
  • Intel Core i9-12900K vs Ryzen 9 5900X and 5950X: Alder Lake and Ryzen 5000 Face Off
  • Intel Core i5-12600K vs AMD Ryzen 5 5600X and 5800X Face Off: Ryzen Has Fallen
  • Intel Core i7-12700K vs AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and 5800X Face Off: Intel Rising
  • Intel Core i5-12400 vs AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Face-Off: The Gaming Value Showdown
  • MORE: Best CPUs for Gaming
  • MORE: AMD vs Intel
  • MORE: Zen 4 Ryzen 7000 All We Know
  • MORE: How to Overclock a CPU
  • MORE: How to check CPU Temperature
  • MORE: All CPUs Content

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom’s Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

Topics

CPUs

Core 2 Duo E8400 [in 4 benchmarks]


Intel
Core 2 Duo E8400

Buy

  • Interface
  • Core clock speed
  • Max video memory
  • Memory type
  • Memory clock speed
  • Maximum resolution

Summary

Intel started Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 sales on January 2008. This is Wolfdale architecture desktop processor primarily aimed at office systems. It has 2 cores and 2 threads, and is based on 45 nm manufacturing technology, with a maximum frequency of 3000 MHz and a locked multiplier.

Compatibility-wise, this is LGA775 processor with a TDP of 65 Watt and a maximum temperature of 72 °C. It supports DDR1, DDR2, DDR3 memory.

It provides poor benchmark performance at


1.16%

of a leader’s which is AMD EPYC 7h22.


Core 2
Duo E8400

vs


EPYC
7h22

General info


Core 2 Duo E8400 processor market type (desktop or notebook), architecture, sales start time and pricing.

Place in performance rating 2299
Place by popularity 75
Value for money 1.86
Market segment Desktop processor
Architecture codename Wolfdale (2008−2010)
Release date January 2008 (14 years ago)
Current price $76 of 14999 (Xeon Platinum 9282)

Value for money

To get the index we compare the characteristics of the processors and their cost, taking into account the cost of other processors.

  • 0
  • 50
  • 100

Technical specs


Basic microprocessor parameters such as number of cores, number of threads, base frequency and turbo boost clock, lithography, cache size and multiplier lock state. These parameters can generally indicate CPU performance, but to be more precise you have to review its test results.

Physical cores 2 (Dual-core)
Threads 2
Base clock speed 3 GHz of 4.7 (FX-9590)
Boost clock speed 3 GHz of 5.8 (Core i9-13900K)
L1 cache 64K (per core) of 1536 (EPYC Embedded 3401)
L2 cache 6 MB (shared) of 12 (Core 2 Quad Q9550)
L3 cache 0 KB of 32768 (Ryzen Threadripper 1998)
Chip lithography 45 nm of 5 (Apple M1)
Die size 104 mm2
Maximum core temperature 72 °C of 110 (Atom x7-E3950)
Maximum case temperature (TCase) 72 °C of 105 (Core i7-5950HQ)
Number of transistors 410 million of 57000 (Apple M1 Max)
64 bit support +
Windows 11 compatibility
Unlocked multiplier
VID voltage range 0. 85V-1.3625V

Compatibility


Information on Core 2 Duo E8400 compatibility with other computer components and devices: motherboard (look for socket type), power supply unit (look for power consumption) etc. Useful when planning a future computer configuration or upgrading an existing one.

Note that power consumption of some processors can well exceed their nominal TDP, even without overclocking. Some can even double their declared thermals given that the motherboard allows to tune the CPU power parameters.

Number of CPUs in a configuration 1 of 8 (Opteron 842)
Socket LGA775
Thermal design power (TDP) 65 Watt of 400 (Xeon Platinum 9282)

Technologies and extensions


Technological capabilities and additional instructions supported by Core 2 Duo E8400. You’ll probably need this information if you require some particular technology.

AES-NI
Enhanced SpeedStep (EIST) +
Enhanced SpeedStep (EIST) +
Turbo Boost Technology
Hyper-Threading Technology
Idle States +
Thermal Monitoring +
Demand Based Switching
FSB parity

Security technologies


Processor technologies aimed at improving security, for example, by protecting against hacks.

TXT +
EDB +

Virtualization technologies


Supported virtual machine optimization technologies. Some are specific to Intel only, some to AMD.

VT-d +
VT-x +

Memory specs


Types, maximum amount and channel number of RAM supported by Core 2 Duo E8400’s memory controller. Depending on the motherboard, higher memory frequency may be supported.

Supported memory types DDR1, DDR2, DDR3 of 5200 (Ryzen 5 7600X)

Benchmark performance


Single-core and multi-core benchmark results of Core 2 Duo E8400. Overall benchmark performance is measured in points in 0-100 range, higher is better.


Overall score

This is our combined benchmark performance rating. We are regularly improving our combining algorithms, but if you find some perceived inconsistencies, feel free to speak up in comments section, we usually fix problems quickly.


Core 2 Duo E8400
1. 16

  • Passmark
  • GeekBench 5 Single-Core
  • GeekBench 5 Multi-Core
  • 3DMark Fire Strike Physics
Passmark

Passmark CPU Mark is a widespread benchmark, consisting of 8 different types of workload, including integer and floating point math, extended instructions, compression, encryption and physics calculation. There is also one separate single-threaded scenario measuring single-core performance.

Benchmark coverage: 68%


Core 2 Duo E8400
1165

GeekBench 5 Single-Core

GeekBench 5 Single-Core is a cross-platform application developed in the form of CPU tests that independently recreate certain real-world tasks with which to accurately measure performance. This version uses only a single CPU core.

Benchmark coverage: 37%


Core 2 Duo E8400
411

GeekBench 5 Multi-Core

GeekBench 5 Multi-Core is a cross-platform application developed in the form of CPU tests that independently recreate certain real-world tasks with which to accurately measure performance. This version uses all available CPU cores.

Benchmark coverage: 37%


Core 2 Duo E8400
714

3DMark Fire Strike Physics

Benchmark coverage: 4%


Core 2 Duo E8400
2370


Relative perfomance


Overall Core 2 Duo E8400 performance compared to nearest competitors among desktop CPUs.



Intel Pentium E6800
100


Intel Celeron G540T
100


AMD A4-4000
100


Intel Core 2 Duo E8400
100


AMD Athlon II X2 255
100


AMD Athlon II X2 250e
99.14


Intel Pentium E5800
99.14

AMD equivalent


We believe that the nearest equivalent to Core 2 Duo E8400 from AMD is A4-4000, which is nearly equal in speed and higher by 2 positions in our rating.


A4
4000


Compare


Here are some closest AMD rivals to Core 2 Duo E8400:


AMD Phenom II X2 550
100.86


AMD A4-4000
100


AMD Athlon II X2 255
100


Intel Core 2 Duo E8400
100


AMD Athlon II X2 250e
99.14


AMD Sempron 3850
98.28


AMD Phenom II X2 B55
98.28

Similar processors

Here is our recommendation of several processors that are more or less close in performance to the one reviewed.


Athlon II
X2 255


Compare


Pentium
E6800


Compare


Athlon II
X2 250e


Compare


Pentium
E5800


Compare


Phenom II
X2 550


Compare


Phenom II
X2 B55


Compare

Recommended graphics cards

These graphics cards are most commonly used with Core 2 Duo E8400 according to our statistics.


GeForce
9600 GT

4.4%


GeForce GT
710

3.9%


GeForce GT
730

3.7%


GeForce GTS
450

3.4%


GeForce GTX
550 Ti

3.1%


GeForce
9800 GT

2.9%


GeForce GTS
250

2.7%


GeForce
210

2. 4%


GeForce GTX
1050 Ti

2.3%


GeForce GT
630

2.2%

User rating


Here is the rating given to the reviewed processor by our users. Let others know your opinion by rating it yourself.


Questions and comments


Here you can ask a question about Core 2 Duo E8400, agree or disagree with our judgements, or report an error or mismatch.


Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Intel’s Core 2 Duo and Extreme processors

INTEL’S DESKTOP PROCESSORS HAVE NOT been in a good place for the past two and a half years. Pentium 4 and Pentium D CPUs have run at relatively high clock speeds but delivered relatively low performance compared to their competition from AMD. They’ve also drawn a tremendous amount of power, which they’ve generously expended as heat. In other words, they’ve been hotter than Jessica Simpson and slower than, well, Jessica Simpson. Despite heroic efforts by Intel’s engineering and manufacturing types, these chips based on the Netburst microarchitecture haven’t been able to overcome their inherent limitations well enough to keep up with the Athlon 64. As a result, Intel decided to scrap Netburst and bet the farm on a new high-performance, low-power design from the Israel-based design team responsible for the Pentium M.

The product of that team’s efforts is a new CPU microarchitecture known as Core, of which the Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Extreme are among the first implementations intended for desktop PCs. We’ve been knee-deep in hype about the Core architecture for months now, with a stream of juicy technical details, semi-official benchmark previews, and clandestine reviews of pre-release products feeding the anticipation. Clearly, when a player as big as Intel stumbles as badly as it has, PC enthusiasts and most others in the industry are keen to see it get back up and start delivering exciting products once again.

Fortunately, the wait for Core 2 processors is almost over. Intel has decided to take the wraps off final reviews of its new CPUs today, in anticipation of the chips’ release to the public in a couple of weeks. Fish have gotta swim, politicians have gotta dissemble, and TR has gotta test hardware, so of course we’ve had the Core 2 processors on the test bench here in Damage Labs for a thorough workout against AMD’s finest—including the new Energy Efficient versions of the Athlon 64 X2. After many hours of testing, we’re pleased to report that the Core 2 chips live up to the hype. Intel has recovered its stride, returned to its winning ways, gotten its groove back, and put the izzle back in its shizzle. Read on for our full review.

Conroe up close
We first previewed the chip code-named Conroe back in March, and now we finally have our hands on one within the confines of our own labs. In spite of all the hype, the Core 2 Duo processor itself is a rather unassuming bloke that looks no different than Pentium CPUs that preceeded it. Like them, it resides in an LGA775-style socket and runs on a 1066MHz front-side bus.

The Core 2 Duo E6700 processor Also like its most immediate predecessors, the Core 2 Duo is manufactured on Intel’s 65nm fab process. Unlike them, however, the Core 2 Duo is not comprised of two chips crammed together on one package; it’s a native dual-core design with a total of roughly 291 million transistors arranged in an area that’s 143 mm2. By contrast, each of the Pentium Extreme Edition 965’s two chips have an estimated 188 million transistors in an 81-mm2 die. If you add the two chips together, the Pentium Extreme Edition 965 has more total transistors and a larger total die area than the Core 2 Duo.

Intel plans to offer five flavors of Core 2 processors initially, with prices and features like so:

Model

Clock speed Bus speed L2 cache TDP Price
Core 2 Extreme X6800 2. 93GHz 1066MHz 4MB 75 W $999
Core 2 Duo E6700 2.67GHz 1066MHz 4MB 65 W $530
Core 2 Duo E6600 2.4GHz 1066MHz 4MB 65 W $316
Core 2 Duo E6400 2. 13GHz 1066MHz 2MB 65 W $224
Core 2 Duo E6300 1.86GHz 1066MHz 2MB 65 W $183

The prices on the mid-range models are quite reasonable once you consider performance, as we’ll do shortly. What you’ll really want to notice about the Core 2 chips, though, is the column labeled TDP. This parameter—thermal design power—specifies the amount of cooling the chip requires, and the numbers are down dramatically from the Pentium Extreme Edition 965’s rating of 130W. Clock speeds are down, as well, since the Core microarchitecture focuses on achieving high performance per clock rather than stratospheric clock frequencies. The fastest Core 2 processor is the X6800 Extreme, which is separated from the regular Core 2 Duos only by its 2.93GHz clock speed and a 10W higher TDP—oh, and by almost half a grand.

Intel says complete PC systems based on the Core 2 Extreme X6800 and individually boxed products will both begin selling on July 27th, while Core 2 Duo processors with 4MB of L2 cache should show up on August 7th. Intel will be transitioning its CPU production gradually away from Pentiums to Core 2 Duos, and that transition might not happen as quickly as the market would like. I wouldn’t be surprised to see strong demand and short supply of these processors for the next couple of months, until Intel is able to ramp up production volumes. The less expensive versions of the Core 2 Duo with 2MB of L2 cache are initial casualties of this controlled ramp. They aren’t expected to be available until the fourth quarter of this year.

On a brighter note, the supporting infrastructure for Core 2 chips is already fairly well established. The processors should be compatible with a number of chipsets, including the enthusiast-class 975X and the upcoming 965-series mainstream chipsets from Intel. NVIDIA’s nForce4 SLI X16 Intel Edition should work, too, as well as the yet-to-be-released nForce 500 series for Intel. In fact, the Core 2 can act as a drop-in replacement for a Pentium D or Pentium Extreme Edition, provided that the motherboard is capable of supplying the lower voltages that Core 2 processors require. Only the most recent motherboards seem to have Core 2 support, so you’ll want to check carefully with the motherboard maker before assuming a board is compatible. Our Core 2 Duo and Extreme review samples, for example, came from Intel with an updated version of the D975XBX motherboard, since older revisions couldn’t supply the proper voltage.

Speaking of which, the upgrade path for those who buy motherboards for Core 2 processors in the next few months isn’t entirely clear. The server/workstation version of the Core microarchitecture, the Woodcrest Xeon, already rides on a faster 1333MHz front-side bus. The Core 2 Duo may move to this faster bus frequency at some point, but Intel hasn’t revealed a schedule for this move. Intel has revealed plans to deliver “Kentsfield,” a quad-core processor with two Conroe chips in a single package, in early 2007, but we don’t yet know whether current motherboards will be able to support it. Investing in a Core 2-capable motherboard right now might be a recipe for longevity, but it might also be a dead end as far as CPU upgrades are concerned.

What’s with the name?
Before we go on, we should probably take a moment to talk about the Core 2 Duo product name. It’s dreadful, of course, but for deeper reasons than you might think. You see, microprocessors tend to be known by several names throughout their lives, and usually those names aren’t really related. For example, the chip code-named Willamette, based on a microarchitecture called Netburst, became the first product known as Pentium 4. The multiple names may be a little difficult to keep straight, but they’re distinctive and follow a coherent logic.

This chip, however, is different. The microarchitecture is called Core, the chip is code-named Conroe, and the product is called Core 2 Duo. By that logic, the chip code-named Willamette would have been based on the Willette microarchitecture, and the first product might have been the Willette 4 Quadro, which everyone knows is actually a disposable razor.

The Core 2 Duo’s name does make sense from a certain perspective, though, because Intel has been shipping the original Core Duo as a dual-core mobile processor since the beginning of the year. There’s also a single-core version of that processor known as the Core Solo, which explains the whole Duo suffix. And the mobile version of the Core 2 Duo, based on the chip code-named Merom, will be the follow-up to the Core Duo.

See? Ahh.

So why name the microarchitecture Core? You’ve got me. The Core microarchitecture is a descendant of the one found in the current Core Duo, but it’s been pretty extensively reworked and certainly deserves a new name. The fact that its name matches up with the previous-gen product’s name is confounding. We’ll simply have to, as one Intel employee admonished at the Spring ’06 IDF, “Deal with it.”

 

The Core microarchitecture
The heritage of the Core microarchitecture can be traced back through the Core Duo and Pentium M, through the Pentium II and III, all the way to the original Pentium Pro. That original design has undergone some serious evolutionary changes, plus a few radical mutations, along the way, and the Core microarchitecture may be the most sweeping set of changes yet. Even compared to its direct forebear, the Core Duo, the Core design can be considered substantially new.

Core’s genesis was a project known internally at Intel as Merom, whose mission was to build a replacement for the Pentium M and Core Duo mobile processors. The Israel-based design team responsible for Intel’s mobile CPUs followed a distinctive design philosophy focused intently on energy efficiency, which helped make the Pentium M a resounding success as part of the Centrino platform. When power and heat became problems for Netburst-based desktop and server processors, Intel turned to Merom as the source of a new, common microarchitecture for its mobile, desktop, and server CPUs.

Because of its orientation toward power efficiency, the Core architecture is a very different design from Netburst. From the very first Pentium 4, Netburst was a “speed demon” type of architecture, a chip designed not for clock-for-clock performance, but to be comfortable running at high clock frequencies. To this end, the original Netburst processors had a relatively long 20-stage main pipeline. For a time, this design achieved good results at the 130nm process node, but all of that changed when Intel introduced a vastly reworked Netburst at 90nm. With its pipeline stretched to 31 stages and its transistor count up significantly, the Pentium 4 “Prescott” still had trouble delivering high clock speeds without getting too hot, and performance suffered as a result.

The Core architecture, meanwhile, is the opposite of a speed demon; it’s a “brainiac” instead. Core has a relatively short 14-stage pipeline, but it’s very “wide,” with ample execution resources aimed at handling lots of instructions at once. Core is unique among x86-compatible processors in its ability to fetch, decode, issue and retire up to four instructions in a single clock cycle. Core can even execute 128-bit SSE instructions in a single clock cycle, rather than the two cycles required by previous architectures. In order to keep all of its out-of-order execution resources occupied, Core has deeper buffers and more slots for instructions in flight.

A block diagram of one Core execution, err, core. Source: Intel.

Like other contemporary PC processors, Core translates x86 instructions into a different set of instructions that its internal, RISC-like core can execute. Intel calls these internal instructions micro-ops. Core inherits the Pentium M and Core Duo’s ability to fuse certain micro-op pairs and send them down the pipeline for execution together, a provision that can make the CPU’s execution resources seem even wider that they are. To this ability, Core adds the capability to fuse some pairs of x86 “macro-ops,” such as compare and jump, that tend to occur together commonly. Not only can these provisions enhance performance, but they can also reduce the amount of energy expended in order to execute an instruction sequence.

Another innovation in Core is a feature Intel has somewhat cryptically named memory disambiguation. Most modern CPUs speculatively execute instructions out of order and then reorder them later to create the illusion of sequential execution. Memory disambiguation extends out-of-order principles to the memory system, allowing for loads to be moved ahead of stores in certain situations. That may sound like risky business, but that’s where the disambiguation comes in. The memory system uses an algorithm to predict which loads are to move ahead of stores, removing the ambiguity.

See? Ahh.

This optimization can pay big performance dividends.

A picture of the Core 2 die. Source: Intel.

In contrast to the various “dual-core” implementations of Netburst, the Core microarchitecture is a natively dual-core design. The chip’s two execution cores each have their own separate, 32K L1 instruction and data caches, but they share a common L2 cache that can be either 2MB or 4MB in size. (The execution trace cache from Netburst is not carried over here.) The chip can allocate space in this L2 cache dynamically on an as-needed basis, dedicating more space to one core than the other in periods of asymmetrical activity. The common cache also eliminates the need for coherency protocol traffic on the system’s front-side bus, and one core can pass data to another simply by transferring ownership of that data in the cache. This arrangement is easily superior to the Pentium D’s approach, where the two cores can communicate and share data only via the front-side bus.

As Intel’s brand-new common microarchitecture, Core is of course equipped with all of the latest features. String ’em together, and you get something like this: MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSE4, EM64T, EIST, C1E, XD, and VT, to name a subset of the complete list. The most notable addition here is probably EM64T—Intel’s name for x86-64 compatibility—because the Core Duo didn’t have it. In order to make its way into desktops and servers, Core needed to be a 64-bit capable processor, and so it is.

The scope and depth of the changes to the Core microarchitecture simply from its direct “Yonah” Core Duo ancestor are too much to cover in a review like this one, but hopefully you have a sense of things. For further reading on the details of the Core architecture, let me recommend David Kanter’s excellent overview of the design.

AMD answers with Energy Efficient Athlons
Anticipating better power efficiency from Intel’s new desktop processors, AMD has begun offering Energy Efficient versions of many of its CPUs for the new Socket AM2 infrastructure. Much like the Turion 64 mobile processor and the HE versions of the Opteron server chips, these Energy Efficient Athlon 64s have been manufactured using a tweaked fabrication process intended to produce chips capable of operating at lower voltages. Making these more efficient chips isn’t easy, so AMD charges a price premium for the Energy Efficient models that averages about 40 bucks over the non-EE versions.

The Athlon 64 X2 3800+ Energy Efficent Small Form Factor (left) and Athlon 64 X2 4600+ Energy Efficient (right)

Just as we wrapped up our testing of the Core 2 Duo, a pair of these new Energy Efficient processors arrived from AMD. On the right above is the EE version of the Athlon 64 X2 4600+. AMD rates its max thermal power at 65 W, down from 89W in the stock version. Currently, the X2 4600+ EE commands a $43 price premium over the regular X2 4600+.

The processor on the left above may have the longest product name of any desktop CPU ever: “Athlon 64 X2 3800+ Energy Efficient Small Form Factor.” This long-winded name, though, signals a very frugal personality; AMD rates this processor’s max thermal power at only 35W. Making the leap from the stock version to the EE SFF model will set you back roughly 60 bucks, or you can stop halfway and get the X2 3800+ EE with a 65W TDP for 20 bucks more than the basic 89W version.

By the way, you may be tempted to compare the TDP numbers for the Core 2 Duo with these processors, but there is some risk in doing so. AMD generates its TDP ratings using a simple maximum value, while Intel uses a more complex method that produces numbers that may be less than the processor’s actual peak power use. As a result, direct comparisons between AMD and Intel TDP numbers may not reflect the realities involved.

For all intents and purposes beyond power consumption and the related heat production, the EE versions of the Athlon 64 X2 ought to be identical to the originals. They run at the same clock speeds, have the same feature sets, and should deliver equivalent performance. Because that’s so, and due to limited testing time, we’ve restricted our testing of these Energy Efficient chips to power consumption.

 

Our testing methods
Please note that the two Pentium D 900-series processors in our test are actually a Pentium Extreme Edition 965 chip that’s been set to the appropriate core and bus speeds and had Hyper-Threading disabled in order to simulate the actual products. Similarly, our Socket AM2 versions of the Athlon 64 X2 4800+, 4600+, and 4200+ are actually the Athlon 64 FX-62 and X2 5000+ clocked down to the appropriate speeds, and the Core 2 Duo E6600 is actually an underclocked Core 2 Extreme X6800. The performance of our “simulated” processor models should be identical to the actual products.

Also, I’ve placed asterisks next to the memory clock speeds of the Socket AM2 test systems in the table below. Due to limitations in AMD’s memory clocking scheme, a couple of these systems couldn’t set their memory clocks to exactly 800MHz.

As ever, we did our best to deliver clean benchmark numbers. Tests were run at least three times, and the results were averaged.

Our test systems were configured like so:

Processor Pentium D 950 3.4GHz
Pentium D 960 3.6GHz
Pentium Extreme Edition 965 3. 73GHz Core 2 Duo E6600 2.4GHz
Core 2 Duo E6700 2.66GHz
Core 2 Extreme 2.93GHz
Athlon 64 X2 4200+ 2.2GHz
Athlon 64 X2 4800+ 2.4GHz
Athlon 64 X2 4600+ 2.4GHz
Athlon 64 X2 5000+ 2.6GHz
Athlon 64 FX-62 2.8GHz
Athlon 64 X2 3800+ Energy Efficient
Athlon 64 X2 4600+ Energy Efficient
System bus 800MHz (200MHz quad-pumped) 1066MHz (266MHz quad-pumped) 1066MHz (266MHz quad-pumped) 1GHz HyperTransport
Motherboard Intel D975XBX Intel D975XBX Intel D975XBX Asus M2N32-SLI Deluxe
BIOS revision BX97510J. 86A.1073.
2006.0427.1210
BX97510J.86A.1073.
2006.0427.1210
BX97510J.86A.1209.
2006.0601.1340
0402
North bridge 975X MCH 975X MCH 975X MCH nForce 590 SLI SPP
South bridge ICH7R ICH7R ICH7R nForce 590 SLI MCP
Chipset drivers INF Update 7.2.2.1007
Intel Matrix Storage Manager 5.5.0.1035
INF Update 7. 2.2.1007
Intel Matrix Storage Manager 5.5.0.1035
INF Update 7.2.2.1007
Intel Matrix Storage Manager 5.5.0.1035
SMBus driver 4.52
IDE/SATA driver 6.67
Memory size 2GB (2 DIMMs) 2GB (2 DIMMs) 2GB (2 DIMMs) 2GB (2 DIMMs)
Memory type Crucial Ballistix PC2-8000
DDR2 SDRAM at 800MHz
Crucial Ballistix PC2-8000
DDR2 SDRAM at 800MHz
Corsair TWIN2X2048-8500C5 DDR2 SDRAM at 800MHz Corsair TWIN2X2048-8500C5 DDR2 SDRAM at 800MHz*
CAS latency (CL) 4 4 4 4
RAS to CAS delay (tRCD) 4 4 4 4
RAS precharge (tRP) 4 4 4 4
Cycle time (tRAS) 15 15 15 12
Audio Integrated ICH7R/STAC9221D5
with SigmaTel 5. 10.4991.0 drivers
Integrated ICH7R/STAC9221D5
with SigmaTel 5.10.4991.0 drivers
Integrated ICH7R/STAC9221D5
with SigmaTel 5.10.4991.0 drivers
Integrated nForce 590 MCP/AD1988B with SoundMAX 5.10.2.4490 drivers
Hard drive Maxtor DiamondMax 10 250GB SATA 150
Graphics GeForce 7900 GTX 512MB PCI-E with ForceWare 84.25 drivers
GeForce 7900 GTX 512MB PCI-E with ForceWare 84.21 drivers (WorldBench only)
OS Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 (WorldBench only)

Thanks to Corsair and Crucial for providing us with memory for our testing. Both of them provide products and support that are far and away superior to generic, no-name memory.

Also, all of our test systems were powered by OCZ GameXStream 700W power supply units. Thanks to OCZ for providing these units for our use in testing.

The test systems’ Windows desktops were set at 1280×1024 in 32-bit color at an 85Hz screen refresh rate. Vertical refresh sync (vsync) was disabled.

We used the following versions of our test applications:

  • SiSoft Sandra 2007.5.10.98 64-bit
  • CPU-Z 1.33
  • Compiled binary of C Linpack port from Ace’s Hardware
  • POV-Ray for Windows 3.6.1 64-bit
  • SMPOV 4.6
  • Cinebench 9.5 64-bit Edition
  • 3ds max 8.0
  • LAME MT 3.97a 64-bit
  • Windows Media Encoder 9 x64 Edition
  • Sphinx 3.3
  • picCOLOR 4.0 build 561 64-bit
  • The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion 1.1
  • Battlefield 2 1.22
  • Quake 4 1.2 with trq4demo5
  • FEAR 1.03
  • Unreal Tournament 2004 v3369 and 3369 64-bit Edition with trdemo1
  • 3DMark06 1. 0.2
  • WorldBench 5.0

The tests and methods we employ are generally publicly available and reproducible. If you have questions about our methods, hit our forums to talk with us about them.

 

Memory performance
We’ll begin our tests with a customary look at memory subsystem performance. These results won’t track with performance in most real-world applications, but they can teach us a thing or two about these processors and how they compare.

Although our Intel motherboard has dual channels of 667MHz DDR memory, The Core 2 Duo’s path to main memory is limited by its 1066MHz front-side bus. With their on-chip memory controllers, the Athlon 64 processors can take better advantage of the peak bandwidth offered by two channels of DDR2 memory. That said, the Core 2 Duo doesn’t achieve the same throughput as the Extreme Edition 965, which also rides on a 1066MHz bus. The gap between these two Intel CPU architectures may stem from the algorithms they each use to govern pre-fetching of data from main memory into the L2 cache. The Netburst processor may be more aggressive here in a way that benefits it in this synthetic test.

Next up is our ancient version of Linpack. This classic benchmark is traditionally used to measure floating-point math performance, but we use this unoptimized version simply to get a look at the “shape” of the memory subsystem. Unfortunately, this rendition of Linpack has a fixed maximum matrix size of 2MB, so we can’t really see how the Core 2’s entire L2 cache or main memory performs. I would have cut these results out of the review entirely, were they not so dramatic.

The Core 2 processors look to have one heck of a fast cache subsystem, at least in the first 2MB. Neither the Pentiums nor the Athlons come close.

Memory bandwidth is important, but memory access latencies are arguably more important, though the two are interrelated. This result is intriguing, because the Core 2 processors manage to achieve much lower access latencies than the Netburst-based Pentiums, despite using the same memory timings on the same type of motherboard. These numbers, however, are just one sample point in a range of possibilities. Let’s look at representatives of the three different microarchitectures in more detail.

The graphs below show results from multiple step and block sizes. I’ve color-coded the graphs to make them easier to read. For each processor, the yellow areas represent block sizes that fit into the L1 data cache, the light orange areas represent L2 cache, and the dark orange areas represent main memory.

The Athlon 64’s built-in memory controller gives it a pronounced and consistent advantage in getting out to main memory quickly, but the Core 2 really does shave 15 to 20 nanoseconds off of main memory access times versus the Pentium Extreme Edition. I hate to speculate too much about the reasons, but they may include the Core 2’s lower latency caches (which we see illustrated here), potentially less aggressive pre-fetching (and thus a less saturated bus), and possibly even its ability to move loads ahead of stores via memory disambiguation.

Oh, and CPU geeks may be interested to note that our latency test app reports the Core 2’s L1 cache latency is three cycles, for what it’s worth.

 

Gaming performance

Quake 4
We tested Quake 4 by running our own custom timedemo with and without its multiprocessor optimizations enabled. These can be switched on in the game console by setting the “r_usesmp” variable to “1”.

Above the following benchmark graph, and throughout most of the tests in this review, we’ve included Task Manager plots showing CPU utilization. These plots were captured on the Pentium Extreme Edition 965, and they should offer some indication of how much impact multithreading has on the operation of each application. Single-threaded apps may sometimes show up as spread across multiple processors in Task Manager, but the total amount of space below all four lines shouldn’t equal more than the total area of one square if the test is truly single-threaded. Anything significantly more than that is probably an indication of some multithreaded component in the execution of the test. Because WorldBench’s tests are entirely scripted, however, we weren’t able to capture Task Manager plots for them, as you’ll notice later.

NVIDIA’s video drivers are now multithreaded, so we should see some amount of multithreading action happening in any application that uses the GPU for 3D graphics, even if the game is only single-threaded.

With “r_usesmp 0”

With “r_usesmp 1”

Just like that, we see a new order being established. The three Core 2 Duo chips capture the top three spots, with even the E6600—at 2.4GHz and $316—outperforming the Athlon 64 FX-62. The Core 2’s advantage over the Athlon 64 X2 is similar to the one the AMD chips have held over the Pentiums for so long. Obviously, there’s utterly no contest between the new Intel processors and their predecessors. Will this pattern hold in other games?

The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
We tested Oblivion by manually playing through a specific point in the game five times for each CPU while recording frame rates using the FRAPS utility. Each gameplay sequence lasted 60 seconds. This method has the advantage of simulating real gameplay quite closely, but it comes at the expense of precise repeatability. We believe five sample sessions are sufficient to get reasonably consistent and trustworthy results. In addition to average frame rates, we’ve included the low frames rates, because those tend to reflect the user experience in performance-critical situations. In order to diminish the effect of outliers, we’ve reported the median of the five low frame rates we encountered.

We set Oblivion’s graphical quality settings to “Medium,” 800×600 resolution, with HDR lighting enabled. Our Oblivion test is a quick run around the Imperial City Arboretum.

The Core 2 processors show up strong again here. Only the E6600 falls behind the FX-62, and the Core 2 Extreme X6800 cranks out roughly twice the average and minimum frames rate of the Pentium Extreme Edition 965.

 

F.E.A.R.
We used F.E.A.R.’s built-in “test settings” benchmark to get these results. The game’s “Computer” and “Graphics” performance options were both set to “High.”

The Core 2 processors come up big in F.E.A.R., as well, by posting solid gains over the Athlon 64s in both average and minimum frame rates. To give you some sense of how much more effective this microarchitecture is for gaming than Netburst, consider that the Core 2 E6600’s low is 52 frames per second—double that of the Pentium D 950 and an indicator of much smoother gameplay.

Battlefield 2
We used FRAPS to capture BF2 frame rates just as we did with Oblivion. Graphics quality options were set to BF2’s canned “High” quality profile. This game has a built-in cap at 100 frames per second, and we intentionally left that cap enabled so we could offer a faithful look at real-world performance.

BF2 has been considered something of a system hog in the past, but all of these CPUs are fast enough to run BF2 acceptably. The Core 2 Extreme keeps the game practically locked at its 100Hz peak refresh rate.

Unreal Tournament 2004
We used a more traditional recorded timedemo for testing UT2004, but we tried out two versions of the game, the original 32-bit flavor and the 64-bit version.

UT2004 has been a thorn in Intel’s side for ages, but no longer. Core 2 changes the equation entirely. As for the question of 32-bit code versus 64-bit, looks to me like none of the processors gain significantly more than the others by going to the 64-bit executable.

 

3DMark06
3DMark06 combines the results from its graphics and CPU tests in order to reach an overall score. Here’s how the processors did overall and in each of those tests.

3DMark’s four graphics tests are almost entirely GPU bound, even with our test systems’ GeForce 7900 GTX graphics cards. The Core 2 chips gain their advantage in the overall 3DMark score by doing very well in the two CPU tests.

 

WorldBench overall performance
WorldBench’s overall score is a pretty decent indication of general-use performance for desktop computers. This benchmark uses scripting to step through a series of tasks in common Windows applications and then produces an overall score for comparison. WorldBench also records individual results for its component application tests, allowing us to compare performance in each. We’ll look at the overall score, and then we’ll show individual application results alongside the results from some of our own application tests.

Well, Core 2 processors don’t just excel at 3D gaming. They’ve also taken the top three spots in WorldBench, and their margins of victory are impressive. The Core 2 Extreme opens up a huge lead on the Athlon 64 FX-62, setting a new WorldBench record (at least for us) in the process. Oh, and the Pentium Extreme Edition is a staggering 43 points behind the Core 2 Extreme X6800.

Audio editing and encoding

LAME MP3 encoding
LAME MT is, as you might have guessed, a multithreaded version of the LAME MP3 encoder. LAME MT was created as a demonstration of the benefits of multithreading specifically on a Hyper-Threaded CPU like the Pentium 4. (Of course, multithreading works even better on dual-core processors.) You can download a paper (in Word format) describing the programming effort.

Rather than run multiple parallel threads, LAME MT runs the MP3 encoder’s psycho-acoustic analysis function on a separate thread from the rest of the encoder using simple linear pipelining. That is, the psycho-acoustic analysis happens one frame ahead of everything else, and its results are buffered for later use by the second thread. The author notes, “In general, this approach is highly recommended, for it is exponentially harder to debug a parallel application than a linear one.”

We have results for two different 64-bit versions of LAME MT from different compilers, one from Microsoft and one from Intel, doing two different types of encoding, variable bit rate and constant bit rate. We are encoding a massive 10-minute, 6-second 101MB WAV file here, as we have done in many of our previous CPU reviews.

MusicMatch Jukebox

There are no real surprises here. The Core 2 processors excel at audio encoding and editing, just as they seem to everywhere else.

 

Video editing and encoding

Windows Media Encoder x64 Edition Advanced Profile
We asked Windows Media Encoder to convert a gorgeous 1080-line WMV HD video clip into a 320×240 streaming format using the Windows Media Video 8 Advanced Profile codec.

Windows Media Encoder

Adobe Premiere

VideoWave Movie Creator

Intel’s new processors have the edge in video encoding, as well.

 

Image processing

Adobe Photoshop

ACDSee PowerPack

picCOLOR
picCOLOR was created by Dr. Reinert H. G. Müller of the FIBUS Institute. This isn’t Photoshop; picCOLOR’s image analysis capabilities can be used for scientific applications like particle flow analysis. Dr. Müller has supplied us with new revisions of his program for some time now, all the while optimizing picCOLOR for new advances in CPU technology, including MMX, SSE2, and Hyper-Threading. Naturally, he’s ported picCOLOR to 64 bits, so we can test performance with the x86-64 ISA. Eight of the 12 functions in the test are multithreaded.

Scores in picCOLOR, by the way, are indexed against a single-processor Pentium III 1 GHz system, so that a score of 4.14 works out to 4.14 times the performance of the reference machine.

Add image processing to the list of categories that the Core 2 processors handle well. Notice that in picCOLOR, the Core 2 Extreme X6800 works out to be about 11 times the speed of a Pentium III 1GHz. How’s that for progress?

 

Multitasking and office applications

MS Office

Mozilla

Mozilla and Windows Media Encoder

Two of these three tests, the MS Office and Mozilla plus Windows Media Encoder ones, attempt to simulate real-world user multitasking. The Core 2 processors handle them both very well, unsurprisingly.

 

Other applications

Sphinx speech recognition
Ricky Houghton first brought us the Sphinx benchmark through his association with speech recognition efforts at Carnegie Mellon University. Sphinx is a high-quality speech recognition routine. We use two different versions, built with two different compilers, in an attempt to ensure we’re getting the best possible performance.

The Core 2 Extreme busts out a new record in Sphinx, needing only about 30% of its power to run this high-quality speech recognition routine in real time.

WinZip

Nero

WinZip is another impressive victory for the Core 2 CPUs, while the field is very tight (and probably largely I/O bound) in the Nero test.

 

3D modeling and rendering

Cinebench 2003
Cinebench measures performance in Maxon’s Cinema 4D modeling and rendering app. This is the 64-bit version of Cinebench, primed and ready for these 64-bit processors.

This one is another victory for the Core 2, but the contest is a little closer this time, with Athlon 64 processors taking second and fourth places.

Cinebench’s shading tests are single-threaded, and they allow us to compare the performance of shading with the Cinema 4D engine and software OpenGL with GPU-accelerated OpenGL. Our three Core 2 processors excel in all cases, whether they are doing the shading themselves or feeding a GPU.

 

POV-Ray rendering
POV-Ray just recently made the move to 64-bit binaries, and thanks to the nifty SMPOV distributed rendering utility, we’ve been able to make it multithreaded, as well. SMPOV spins off any number of instances of the POV-Ray renderer, and it will divvy up the scene in several different ways. For this scene, the best choice was to divide the screen horizontally between the different threads, which provides a fairly even workload.

We considered using the new beta of POV-Ray with native support for SMP, but it proved to be very, very slow. We’ll have to try it again once development has progressed further.

POV-Ray rendering has been difficult turf for Netburst-based CPUs to defend, but the Core 2 is much more competitive. Note that the Core 2 processors don’t seem to scale as well when going from one thread to two as the Athlon 64s. I’m not entirely confident that’s not the fault of a quirk in the latest version of SMPOV, so I wouldn’t read too much into it. Using an external program to call the renderer has its perils.

3dsmax 8 rendering
For our 3ds max test, we used the “architecture” scene from SPECapc for 3ds max 7. This scene is very complex and should be nice exercise for these CPUs. Using 3ds max’s default scanline renderer, we first rendered frames 0 to 10 of the scene at 500×300 resolution. The renderer’s “Use SSE” option was enabled.

Next, we rendered just the first frame of the scene in 3ds max’s mental ray renderer. Notice that we’ve changed our time scale from seconds to minutes for this one.

Check out those render times with mental ray. Yeowtch. The Core 2 Extreme finishes nine minutes before the FX-62.

 

SiSoft Sandra Mandelbrot
Next up is SiSoft’s Sandra system diagnosis program, which includes a number of different benchmarks. The one of interest to us is the “multimedia” benchmark, intended to show off the benefits of “multimedia” extensions like MMX and SSE/2. According to SiSoft’s FAQ, the benchmark actually does a fractal computation:

This benchmark generates a picture (640×480) of the well-known Mandelbrot fractal, using 255 iterations for each data pixel, in 32 colours. It is a real-life benchmark rather than a synthetic benchmark, designed to show the improvements MMX/Enhanced, 3DNow!/Enhanced, SSE(2) bring to such an algorithm.

The benchmark is multi-threaded for up to 64 CPUs maximum on SMP systems. This works by interlacing, i.e. each thread computes the next column not being worked on by other threads. Sandra creates as many threads as there are CPUs in the system and assigns [sic] each thread to a different CPU.

We’re using the 64-bit port of Sandra. The “Integer x16” version of this test uses integer numbers to simulate floating-point math. The floating-point version of the benchmark takes advantage of SSE2 to process up to eight Mandelbrot iterations at once.

The Core microarchictecture’s rich execution resources are on display here. Netburst-based chips perform relatively well in these tests, probably because they are executing what I believe is a fairly simple, well-optimized program loop at a very high clock speed. The Core 2 processors, however, have the ability to handle four 128-bit floating-point operations per cycle, or eight 64-bit floating-point operations per cycle, which is considerably more work per clock than competing microarchitectures. The E6600 at 2.4GHz doesn’t quite double the performance of the X2 4600+ at 2.4GHz, but it’s close.

 

Power consumption
We took our power readings at the wall outlet using an Extech 380803 power meter. Only the PC was plugged into the watt meter; the system’s monitor and speakers, for instance, were not. The “idle” readings were taken at the Windows desktop, while the “load” readings were taken using SMPOV and the 64-bit version of the POV-Ray renderer to load up the CPUs. In all cases, we asked SMPOV to use the same number of threads as there were CPU front ends in Task Manager—so four for the Extreme Edition 965, two for the Core 2 and Athlon 64 X2 processors. The test rigs were all equipped with OCZ GameXStream 700W power supply units.

The graph below for idle power use has results with and without “power management.” By “power management,” we mean the dynamic clock speed and voltage throttling technologies from Intel and AMD, known as SpeedStep and Cool’n’Quiet, respectively. The Intel processors also have an enhanced halt state known as C1E. A processor’s halt state is invoked by the OS whenever the system is able to sit idle for a moment. The C1E halt state in the Intel processors ramps down the CPU clock speed and voltage in order to save power, so even without SpeedStep, the CPU’s idle power use is reduced. Keep that in mind when considering the “No power management” results for the Intel processors at idle.

Interestingly, we found that the Core 2’s C1E state doesn’t lower CPU voltage. The CPU multiplier drops to 6.0, bringing the clock speed down to 1.6GHz, but voltage appears to remain unchanged. Turning on SpeedStep, however, drops the CPU’s core voltage, allowing for even lower idle power use.

Another tricky part about power consumption testing is getting good numbers for our “simulated” CPU speed grades. In order to make it work, you have to set the proper CPU core voltage, not just the right clock speeds. I made an attempt at simulating the Athlon 64 X2 models 4800+, 4600+, and 4200+ and the Pentium D 950/960 by setting the CPU voltages manually, but I’ve put an asterisk next to those CPUs in our results as a reminder that they’re simulated. I didn’t even bother including some simulated CPU models because of the difficulty involved and a few questionable results.

For the Athlon 64 X2 4800+, I set the voltage at 1.35V. The X2 4600+ and 4200+ were set to 1.3V. The “power management” idle scores were simply taken from chips with the same cache size (the FX-62 and 5000+, respectively), because all of these processors share the same 1 GHz/1.1V idle with Cool’n’Quiet.

The Pentium D 950 and 960 were trickier, since each Pentium D’s voltage needs are programmed at the factory. In this case, I stuck with the default of 1.312V for both speed grades. On an 800MHz bus, the Pentium D 950 and 950 both clocked down to 2.4 GHz at idle via the C1E halt mechanism. The Extreme Edition 965 clocked down to 3.2 GHz at idle.

You’ll notice that the results below include numbers for the Energy Efficient versions of the Athlon 64 X2 3800+ and 4600+. AMD sent these CPUs out to us along with a more power-efficient motherboard than our Asus M2N32-SLI Deluxe test platform, whose nForce 590 SLI chipset seems to be something of a power hog. The board AMD sent, however, is not an enthusiast-class mobo with dual graphics slots, so we elected not to include it in our tests. We wanted to test the EE chips opposite the Core 2 Duo on an enthusiast-class board, so we stuck with the M2N32-SLI Deluxe. It’s possible that enthusiast-class boards based on the Radeon Xpress 3200 or the nForce 570 SLI chipsets could lower power consumption for all of the Athlon 64 processors here without compromising performance.

Whoa. Performance is way up with the Core 2 processors, and power draw is way down. The Core 2’s mythical “performance per watt”—which is actually a rather slippery thing to quantify—has gotta be the best on the market. The Core 2 Duo E6700 outperforms the Athlon 64 FX-62 more often than not, yet the E6700-based system draws 74 fewer Watts under load.

AMD has made substantial progress on this front with its new Energy Efficient processors. Under load, the Athlon 64 X2 4600+ EE system pulls about 20W less at the wall socket than the stock X2 4600+ system, and the 35W-rated X2 3800+ system draws less power than anything else we tested. Still, even these new CPUs can’t match the performance of the Core 2 processors that are in the same neighborhood in terms of power draw.

 

Overclocking
Like many of the thousand-dollar, high-end processors of late, the Core 2 Extreme X6800 has an unlocked multiplier, so overclocking this beast is simply a matter of turning up that value in the BIOS—even on an Intel motherboard. With very little effort, I had the X6800 running at 3.46GHz on a 1066MHz bus. This was with air cooling—a Zalman CNPS9500 LED. That’s very good air cooling, yes, but nothing terribly exotic.

I had to raise the voltage from the stock 1.2V to 1.375V in order to get it to be completely stable, but at those settings, the CPU ran a pair of Prime95 torture tests for a good while without throwing any errors. With the cooler fan running at its top speed, the CPU leveled out at about 70°C while running those tests.

I tried to coax the X6800 into running at the next multiplier up the ladder, for a top speed of 3.73GHz, but it wouldn’t quite go there. Even with 1.45V flowing into it, the X6800 would POST but wouldn’t boot into Windows. I suspect this CPU could go well past 3.46GHz with some bus overclocking, but I haven’t tried it yet. Even at “only” 3.46GHz, performance was astounding.

This architecture has more headroom than a Ford Excursion. Performance scales up very well with clock speed, too. In fact, these scores may give us some insight into why Intel chose not to move to a 1333MHz front-side bus for the Core 2: the 1066MHz bus just doesn’t look like a serious performance bottleneck.

 

Conclusions
After years of wandering in the wilderness, Intel has recaptured the desktop CPU performance title in dramatic fashion. Both the Core 2 Extreme X6800 and the Core 2 Duo E6700 easily outperform the Athlon 64 FX-62 across a range of applications—and the E6600 is right in the hunt, as well. Not only that, but the Core 2 processors showed no real weaknesses in our performance tests. (I would say that Core looks like a more balanced architecture than Netburst, but at this stage of the game, Netburst just seems slow almost across the board.) No matter what you’re hoping to do with your PC, a Core 2 processor should be a very solid choice.

The PC industry can also breathe a collective sigh of relief about power and thermal issues now that Core 2 has arrived. Intel finally has a firm handle on those problems. These processors consume less power—and thus produce less heat—than desktop Pentiums have for quite a while. The E6700 system’s total power draw when fully loaded was 156 W, only 14W more than the Pentium Extreme Edition system drew while sitting idle. What’s more, even the high-end Core 2 processors’ power use was in line with that of the Energy Efficient versions of the Athlon 64 X2. That leaves room for many good things to happen, from less expensive cooling systems to quieter, smaller enclosures and even some righteous overclocking. Combine the low power draw with the performance we’ve seen, and the Core 2 is clearly the most energy-efficient desktop processor around.

As much as I appreciate the performance and efficiency of these new CPUs, though, I can’t endorse forking out a cool grand (minus one) for a Core 2 Extreme X6800. These top-end CPUs are always iffy values, even if they’re insane performers. Meanwhile, the prices on the first two Core 2 Duos are very reasonable for what you get. At $316, the Core 2 Duo E6600 looks like a tremendous deal, provided you can get your hands on one. The E6700 is pricier at $530, but it’ll beat the much more expensive FX-62 at almost every turn.

In fact, after seeing the Core 2 in action, many folks may be wondering how AMD is going to keep up. The Athlon 64 X2 4200+ currently lists for more than the Core 2 Duo E6600, and that’s just not gonna cut it. Fortunately, AMD has confirmed to us that a major price move is coming in July. We don’t have the specifics just yet, but they say they intend to maintain a competitive price-performance ratio. That may mean we’ll see the dramatic price cuts rumored to be coming, which would be a good start.

For its next trick, AMD needs to get its 65nm fab process going ASAP. I’ve heard prognostications that AMD won’t be able compete against Core 2 chips with its current AMD64 microarchitecture. That may be the case, but I’m not entirely convinced. The contest we’ve seen in the preceding pages pitted CPUs manufactured on AMD’s 90nm process against CPUs made on Intel’s 65nm process. The Netburst fiasco at 90nm has made us forgetful about the benefits of process shrinks, but they can be substantial. AMD could be in a much stronger position if it gets to 65nm quickly.

Regardless of what happens with its competition, though, the big story here is that Intel has replaced its troubled Netburst microarchitecture with a world-beater. The Core microarchitecture and the chips based on it are a huge improvement, and a fitting end to the era of the Pentium. 

Core 2 Duo Processor Comparison

  1. Intel Core 2 Duo Specifications

Do you still do a confusion between Intel core 2 duo vs Intel dual core ? We also have others king of processors:

Pentium Dual-Core — The Pentium Dual-Core brand refers to mainstream x86-architecture microprocessors from Intel. They are based on either the 32-bit Yonah or (with quite different microarchitectures) 64-bit Merom, Allendale, and, more recently, with the launch of the model E5200, Wolfdale core, targeted at mobile or desktop computers. In terms of features, price and performance at a given clock frequency, Pentium Dual-Core processors are positioned above Celeron but below Core and Core 2 microprocessors in Intel’s product range. The Core 2 brand was introduced on July 27, 2006, comprising the Solo (single-core), Duo (dual-core), Quad (quad-core), and in 2007, the Extreme (dual- or quad-core CPUs for enthusiasts) version. Intel Core 2 processors with vPro technology (designed for businesses) include the dual-core and quad-core branches.

Intel Core — The Core brand refers to Intel’s 32-bit mobile dual-core x86 CPUs that derived from the Pentium M branded processors. The processor family used a more advanced version of the Intel P6 microarchitecture. It emerged in parallel with the NetBurst (Intel P68) microarchitecture of the Pentium 4 brand, and was a precursor of the 64-bit Core microarchitecture of Core 2 branded CPUs. The Core brand comprised two branches: the Duo (dual-core) and Solo (Duo with one disabled core, which replaced the Pentium M brand of single-core mobile processor).

Intel Core 2 — The Core 2 brand refers to a range of Intel’s consumer 64-bit x86-64 single-, dual-, and quad-core CPUs based on the Intel Core microarchitecture. The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise of two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.[1] The introduction of Core 2 relegated the Pentium brand to the mid-range market, and reunified laptop and desktop CPU lines, which previously had been divided into the Pentium 4, Pentium D, and Pentium M brand.

If you read these information (from Wikipedia) and still aren’t understanding, I advised you read this article on binaryday.com.

The confusion between Intel core 2 duo and Intel dual core primarily resulted from a pointless naming convention by Intel. 2 and dual may be synonyms in English but that does not make Intel core 2 duo vs Intel dual core any more similar. The similarity of names makes even many computer geeks confused when asked to do a comparison of Intel core 2 duo and Intel dual core.

Intel Dual Core is the first dual-core CPU from Intel. The Dual core makes use of two cores on a single die i.e it has two chips in one package. It solves the problem of overheating of Intel Pentium D without compromising on the performance.

Intel Core 2 Duo processors are the next gen processors from Intel. It is developed with a new Architecture called Core. The new architecture of Intel core2 duo makes it a lot better processor that runs cool. Most importantly the Intel core2 duo is a super over clocker.

Thanks again to this article on binaryday.com

Kleber Rodrigo de Carvalho

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    • — CPU Charts —
    • — Other Information —

How does your CPU compare?
Add your CPU to our benchmark chart with PerformanceTest V9!

This chart comparing mid range CPUs is updated daily, and made up of thousands of PerformanceTest benchmark results. Mid range CPUs are typically found in computers that are a few years old. Intel CPUs in this chart include the slower Intel Core2 Duo CPUs, Intel Celerons and Intel Pentiums. AMD CPUs typically in this chart include AMD Mobile chips, AMD Turions, AMD Opteron Dual Core CPUs, AMD Semprons and AMD Athlons.

CPU Mark | Price Performance
(Click to select desired chart)

PassMark — CPU Mark
Low Mid Range CPUs — Updated 30th of May 2019
Processor CPU Mark Price (USD)
Intel Core i7-2630UM @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Core i5-560M @ 2.67GHz

2,578

$60.00
Intel Celeron G1620 @ 2.70GHz $153.59*
AMD Athlon II X3 445

2,574

$91.00*
AMD Athlon X3 435 $95.49*
AMD Phenom 9600B Quad-Core

2,573

$147. 19*
Intel Pentium G3220T @ 2.60GHz $69.99*
AMD A8-6410 APU

2,571

NA
Intel Core i3-530 @ 2.93GHz $189.00
AMD Athlon II X3 440

2,566

$26.99*
Intel Pentium G840 @ 2.80GHz $34.99*
AMD A4-6250J APU

2,556

NA
AMD A9-9410 NA
Intel Xeon X5270 @ 3.50GHz

2,553

NA
Intel Core i7-610E @ 2.53GHz NA
Intel Celeron G1830 @ 2.80GHz

2,544

$94.95
AMD Phenom 9550 Quad-Core $28.99*
Intel Core i3-2328M @ 2.20GHz

2,543

$92.97
Intel Atom C3558 @ 2.20GHz $86.00*
AMD A9-9425

2,537

NA
Intel Core i3-2330M @ 2.20GHz $170.20
Intel Core2 Quad Q9000 @ 2. 00GHz

2,524

$389.00*
AMD A9-9430 NA
AMD Phenom II N970 Quad-Core

2,523

$149.99*
Intel Pentium G640 @ 2.80GHz $150.00
Intel Pentium 3825U @ 1.90GHz

2,519

NA
AMD A4-7210 APU NA
AMD Phenom FX-5000 Quad-Core

2,517

NA
AMD PRO A6-8500B NA
Intel Xeon E5335 @ 2.00GHz

2,513

$17.77*
AMD Embedded G-Series GX-420GI Radeon R7E NA
Intel Core i3-4030Y @ 1.60GHz

2,507

NA
AMD Athlon X4 605e NA
Pentium Dual-Core E6000 @ 3.46GHz

2,501

NA
Intel Core i5-4300Y @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Celeron G1820T @ 2.40GHz

2,496

$42.00*
Intel Celeron G1630 @ 2. 80GHz $69.99
AMD GX-424CC SOC

2,491

NA
Intel Celeron G1610 @ 2.60GHz $299.95
Intel Pentium G2030T @ 2.60GHz

2,487

$64.00*
Intel Core i5 E 520 @ 2.40GHz NA
AMD Phenom II N950 Quad-Core

2,485

$112.60*
Intel Core i7-2610UE @ 1.50GHz NA
Intel Core M-5Y51 @ 1.10GHz

2,477

NA
AMD Athlon II X3 435 $169.95
Intel Core i3-3227U @ 1.90GHz

2,465

NA
Intel Xeon X5260 @ 3.33GHz $54.00
AMD A6-6310 APU

2,455

NA
Intel Atom C3538 @ 2.10GHz $75.00*
Intel Core i5-540M @ 2.53GHz

2,454

$189.95
AMD Athlon II X4 600e $130.23*
AMD Phenom II X3 710

2,446

$84. 53*
Intel Core i3-4005U @ 1.70GHz NA
Intel Core i3-4010U @ 1.70GHz

2,439

$289.00
AMD A6-5200 APU NA
Intel Core i3-2310M @ 2.10GHz

2,431

$38.81
Intel Xeon E3113 @ 3.00GHz $9.79*
Intel Xeon E5240 @ 3.00GHz

2,424

NA
Intel Celeron G555 @ 2.70GHz $40.00*
Intel Pentium Silver N5000 @ 1.10GHz

2,421

$161.00*
Intel Pentium G2020T @ 2.50GHz $47.60*
Intel Xeon E7320 @ 2.13GHz

2,413

NA
AMD GX-420CA SOC NA
Intel Celeron 3965U @ 2.20GHz

2,411

$107.00*
Intel Pentium 2030M @ 2.50GHz $134.00*
AMD Embedded R-Series RX-216GD

2,409

NA
Intel Core i5-4200Y @ 1. 40GHz NA
Intel Core i5-480M @ 2.67GHz

2,402

$80.60*
AMD A4 PRO-3340B NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8600 @ 3.33GHz

2,401

$42.45
AMD Athlon X3 455 NA
Intel Xeon X5272 @ 3.40GHz

2,394

$140.00*
Intel Pentium G3320TE @ 2.30GHz NA
AMD PRO A6-8530B

2,388

NA
AMD A6-6420K APU $149.99*
Intel Core M-5Y10a @ 0.80GHz

2,387

NA
Intel Core i3-2332M @ 2.20GHz NA
Intel Core i5-4210Y @ 1.50GHz

2,378

NA
AMD Phenom II X4 8700e NA
Intel Core i3-2312M @ 2.10GHz

2,374

NA
Intel Pentium G630 @ 2.70GHz $100.00*
AMD A8-3510MX APU

2,370

NA
Intel Core i5-520M @ 2. 40GHz $59.99
Intel Xeon E5603 @ 1.60GHz

2,366

$129.04*
AMD Opteron X3216 APU NA
AMD A8-3530MX APU

2,365

NA
Intel Celeron 2000E @ 2.20GHz NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8290 @ 2.83GHz

2,353

NA
Intel Celeron G1620T @ 2.40GHz $42.00*
AMD A4 PRO-7300B APU

2,335

NA
AMD A9-9420 NA
Intel Celeron N4100 @ 1.10GHz

2,330

$107.00*
AMD A4-6320 APU $69.99*
Intel Core i5-460M @ 2.53GHz

2,323

$74.95*
AMD A9-9400 NA
AMD Phenom 9350e Quad-Core

2,320

$3,382.07*
Intel Core i5-2467M @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD Athlon II X3 425

2,317

$26. 99*
AMD Opteron 1352 $135.99*
AMD Athlon X3 445

2,314

NA
Intel Celeron 2970M @ 2.20GHz NA
AMD A6-6400K APU

2,307

$104.13*
Intel Core i5-4220Y @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD Phenom 9600 Quad-Core

2,306

$49.95
AMD A4-7300 APU $107.99
Intel Core i3-3217U @ 1.80GHz

2,303

$229.99*
AMD Athlon X2 280 $33.49*
Intel Pentium G620 @ 2.60GHz

2,293

$24.99*
Intel Pentium G645T @ 2.50GHz NA
Intel Celeron G550 @ 2.60GHz

2,290

$80.00
Intel Xeon E5320 @ 1.86GHz $38.75*
Intel Celeron G1610T @ 2.30GHz

2,286

$40.04*
AMD Athlon II X3 420e $116.15*
AMD E2-7110 APU

2,283

NA
AMD Opteron 2376 $166. 81*
Intel Core2 Duo E8500 @ 3.16GHz

2,281

$39.99*
AMD A6-6400B APU NA
Intel Xeon L5310 @ 1.60GHz

2,274

$112.50*
AMD Phenom II N930 Quad-Core $129.95*
AMD PRO A4-3350B APU

2,274

NA
Intel Pentium 2020M @ 2.40GHz $134.00*
Intel Xeon L3110 @ 3.00GHz

2,273

NA
Intel Xeon L5240 @ 3.00GHz $31.40*
Intel Pentium 3560M @ 2.40GHz

2,270

NA
Intel Pentium 3550M @ 2.30GHz NA
Intel Core i5-4202Y @ 1.60GHz

2,265

NA
Intel Xeon E5310 @ 1.60GHz $49.00*
Intel Atom C2550 @ 2.40GHz

2,261

NA
Intel Pentium J4205 @ 1.50GHz NA
AMD Opteron 8354

2,255

$24. 00
Intel Core i7-640LM @ 2.13GHz NA
AMD Athlon X2 370K Dual Core

2,251

NA
AMD Athlon II X3 415e $75.00*
AMD Opteron 2393 SE

2,246

NA
Intel Core i5-520 @ 2.40GHz NA
AMD Phenom II X3 700e

2,242

NA
Intel Xeon E3120 @ 3.16GHz NA
AMD Athlon II X3 425e

2,239

NA
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GP-9600 NA
AMD A6-5400B APU

2,232

$105.04*
Intel Celeron 1020E @ 2.20GHz NA
AMD Phenom II X3 705e

2,227

$152.34*
AMD A4 PRO-7350B NA
Intel Pentium 4415Y @ 1.60GHz

2,226

$161.00*
AMD Phenom II X2 565 $29.99*
AMD A4-6300 APU

2,217

$59. 99*
Intel Core i5-3339Y @ 1.50GHz NA
Intel Core i3-4020Y @ 1.50GHz

2,213

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8700 @ 3.50GHz NA
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GE-5560

2,206

NA
AMD Phenom 9500 Quad-Core $28.99*
AMD A6-8500P

2,202

NA
AMD A6-3430MX APU NA
Intel Core i5 750S @ 2.40GHz

2,197

$99.99*
Intel Celeron G540 @ 2.50GHz $45.00*
AMD Athlon X3 425

2,191

NA
AMD Phenom II X620 Dual-Core NA
Intel Core i3-390M @ 2.67GHz

2,183

$38.95*
HP Hexa-Core 2.0GHz $504.27*
AMD A8-3520M APU

2,171

NA
Intel Atom C2558 @ 2.40GHz $136.00*
AMD A4-6210 APU

2,166

NA
AMD A6-9220 NA
Intel Core i3-4012Y @ 1. 50GHz

2,163

NA
Intel Core i3-3217UE @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Xeon E3110 @ 3.00GHz

2,157

$22.99*
AMD A6-5400K APU $99.00
AMD A6-9225

2,153

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8400 @ 3.00GHz $44.95
AMD A6-9220C

2,147

NA
AMD A4-5300B APU $38.00*
Intel Xeon L5320 @ 1.86GHz

2,135

$69.99*
Intel Pentium G6951 @ 2.80GHz $94.00*
Intel Celeron G1820TE @ 2.20GHz

2,132

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9900 @ 3.06GHz $398.95*
Intel Celeron G530 @ 2.40GHz

2,131

$39.99*
AMD Athlon II X2 280 $99.99*
AMD A4-6300B APU

2,129

$100.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E8335 @ 2. 93GHz NA
Intel Core i5-450M @ 2.40GHz

2,127

$31.95*
Intel Core2 Duo E8435 @ 3.06GHz NA
Intel Celeron J3455 @ 1.50GHz

2,124

$369.99
AMD A8-4555M APU NA
AMD Phenom II X2 B59

2,118

$19.48*
Intel Celeron G540T @ 2.10GHz NA
AMD Phenom 9150e Quad-Core

2,113

$39.95*
AMD A4-5050 APU NA
AMD Sempron 240

2,110

$58.00
Intel Xeon E3-1220L v3 @ 1.10GHz NA
AMD Athlon 5150 APU

2,106

$159.95
AMD Phenom II X2 511 NA
AMD A6-9230

2,102

NA
Intel Core i5-430M @ 2.27GHz $139.95
Intel Core i5-2537M @ 1.40GHz

2,094

NA
Intel Core i3-380M @ 2. 53GHz $209.95
Intel Pentium G630T @ 2.30GHz

2,089

$79.99*
AMD Embedded G-Series GX-224IJ Radeon R4E NA
Intel Atom C2538 @ 2.40GHz

2,085

$104.00*
AMD Athlon II X2 B28 $49.05*
AMD Phenom II P960 Quad-Core

2,085

$28.00*
AMD Phenom 8850B Triple-Core NA
AMD Athlon X3 440

2,078

$87.99*
AMD PRO A6-9500B NA
AMD Phenom II X2 521

2,071

NA
AMD Phenom II X2 570 NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X9100 @ 3.06GHz

2,063

$851.00*
Intel Celeron G550T @ 2.20GHz NA
AMD Phenom II X2 560

2,059

$64.99*
Intel Pentium 4405Y @ 1.50GHz NA
AMD Phenom 8750 Triple-Core

2,058

NA
Intel Pentium G6960 @ 2. 93GHz NA
AMD A6-3410MX APU

2,057

$3.99*
Intel Pentium 4410Y @ 1.50GHz $161.00*
AMD Phenom II X2 555

2,045

$27.98*
Intel Atom T5700 @ 1.70GHz NA
AMD A4-5100 APU

2,037

NA
AMD Phenom 8750B Triple-Core NA
Intel Pentium G620T @ 2.20GHz

2,028

$79.99*
Intel Pentium N4200 @ 1.10GHz $198.40
Intel Pentium B980 @ 2.40GHz

2,027

$69.95*
AMD Phenom 8450e Triple-Core NA
AMD Phenom II X2 550

2,021

$49.99*
AMD Phenom II X640 Dual-Core NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9800 @ 2.93GHz

2,020

$423.89*
AMD A4-9125 NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9700 @ 2.80GHz

2,015

NA
Intel Core i3-370M @ 2. 40GHz $39.96*
AMD A6-3500 APU

2,012

$39.99*
AMD A4-5300 APU $141.53
AMD Athlon II X3 400e

2,009

$107.43*
AMD Athlon II X3 405e $79.99*
AMD A6-3420M APU

2,000

NA
Intel Celeron 3867U @ 1.80GHz $107.00*
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GP-9530

1,994

NA
AMD Phenom II N870 Triple-Core NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8300 @ 2.83GHz

1,991

$19.99*
Intel Celeron 3765U @ 1.90GHz NA
AMD Phenom 8650 Triple-Core

1,989

$49.99*
Intel Pentium E6800 @ 3.33GHz $89.00*
AMD A8-7050

1,986

NA
Intel Pentium 3805U @ 1.90GHz NA
Intel Pentium G640T @ 2.40GHz

1,979

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 270 $23. 99*
Intel Celeron 2950M @ 2.00GHz

1,974

NA
AMD A8-3500M APU $69.95
AMD A10 Micro-6700T APU

1,970

NA
Intel Core i7-610 @ 2.53GHz NA
AMD Phenom 8850 Triple-Core

1,968

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E7600 @ 3.06GHz $119.95*
Intel Xeon 5160 @ 3.00GHz

1,963

$37.49
Intel Pentium B970 @ 2.30GHz $50.99*
Intel Pentium J2900 @ 2.41GHz

1,956

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8235 @ 2.80GHz NA
AMD R-460L APU

1,954

NA
Intel Celeron 4205U @ 1.80GHz $107.00*
Intel Core i7-620LM @ 2.00GHz

1,949

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6850 @ 3.00GHz $49.99*
AMD A4-9120

1,944

NA
AMD GX-415GA SOC NA
AMD A6-5357M APU

1,941

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 250e $76. 73*
AMD Phenom II N850 Triple-Core

1,937

$25.00*
Intel Core i3-330E @ 2.13GHz NA
Intel Pentium E6700 @ 3.20GHz

1,932

$16.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T9600 @ 2.80GHz $89.95*
AMD Phenom X3 8550

1,927

$169.95*
Intel Pentium N3540 @ 2.16GHz $250.87*
AMD Phenom 8600B Triple-Core

1,924

$52.99*
AMD A4-4020 APU $86.00
AMD Phenom II X2 B55

1,921

$48.00*
AMD Opteron 2224 SE NA
Intel Pentium J3710 @ 1.60GHz

1,918

NA
AMD A4-5000 APU NA
Intel Celeron 3865U @ 1.80GHz

1,914

NA
AMD Phenom II X2 545 $43.98*
Intel Celeron 3955U @ 2.00GHz

1,913

NA
AMD Athlon X2 340 Dual Core $49. 99*
AMD E2-6110 APU

1,909

NA
AMD A6-5350M APU $43.12
Intel Xeon @ 2.20GHz

1,902

NA
Intel Core i3-4010Y @ 1.30GHz NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X9000 @ 2.80GHz

1,898

$409.95*
VIA QuadCore [email protected] NA
AMD Athlon II X2 B26

1,897

$34.95
Intel Pentium N3530 @ 2.16GHz NA
Intel Atom x7-Z8700 @ 1.60GHz

1,893

$73.63*
Intel Pentium E5800 @ 3.20GHz $29.99*
Intel Core i3-350M @ 2.27GHz

1,891

$108.95
AMD Athlon II X2 265 $82.88*
AMD A9-9420e

1,890

NA
AMD Phenom II N830 Triple-Core NA
Intel Atom x7-Z8750 @ 1.60GHz

1,889

NA
AMD Phenom 8450 Triple-Core $29. 95*
AMD A6-3400M APU

1,883

$29.97*
Intel Core2 Duo E8200 @ 2.66GHz $49.99*
Intel Core2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz

1,874

$14.99*
AMD Athlon II X2 260 $19.99*
Intel Core2 Extreme X6800 @ 2.93GHz

1,873

$263.64*
Intel Atom E3940 @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD Phenom II P920 Quad-Core

1,866

$75.00*
Intel Pentium N3710 @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9600 @ 2.66GHz

1,863

NA
Intel Pentium E6600 @ 3.06GHz $100.00*
Intel Pentium G6950 @ 2.80GHz

1,859

$39.99*
Intel Atom E3950 @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Pentium B960 @ 2.20GHz

1,853

$48.99*
AMD Phenom II N660 Dual-Core $99.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E8335 @ 2. 66GHz

1,846

NA
AMD A4-5150M APU NA
Intel Xeon W3505 @ 2.53GHz

1,844

$24.86
AMD Opteron 2222 $1,664.98*
Intel Celeron N3450 @ 1.10GHz

1,842

$295.99
Intel Celeron J1900 @ 1.99GHz NA
AMD Athlon II X2 255

1,841

$65.22*
Intel Xeon 3075 @ 2.66GHz $349.95*
Intel Pentium J2850 @ 2.41GHz

1,839

NA
Intel Atom x5-Z8550 @ 1.44GHz NA
AMD Phenom 9100e Quad-Core

1,835

$39.95*
AMD A6 Micro-6500T APU NA
AMD A4-4000 APU

1,831

$128.27
Intel Pentium N3700 @ 1.60GHz $444.78*
Intel Core i3-2377M @ 1.50GHz

1,828

NA
AMD Phenom II X2 B57 NA
Intel Xeon L5238 @ 2. 66GHz

1,823

NA
AMD Phenom II P940 Quad-Core NA
Intel Pentium 2127U @ 1.90GHz

1,820

$134.00*
Intel Celeron 1005M @ 1.90GHz NA
AMD Athlon X2 235e

1,806

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9550 @ 2.66GHz $298.95*
Intel Core2 Extreme X7800 @ 2.60GHz

1,802

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9500 @ 2.60GHz NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-72

1,794

NA
Intel Celeron J3160 @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6400+

1,790

$259.95*
Intel Pentium N3520 @ 2.16GHz NA
Intel Core i3-330M @ 2.13GHz

1,786

$159.95*
Intel Xeon 3070 @ 2.66GHz $408.95*
AMD Athlon II X2 B24

1,776

$34. 10
Intel Core i3-2375M @ 1.50GHz NA
Intel Atom Z3795 @ 1.60GHz

1,772

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E7400 @ 2.80GHz $28.99*
Intel Pentium E6500 @ 2.93GHz

1,763

$157.95*
AMD Embedded G-Series GX-215JJ Radeon R2E NA
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GP-9500

1,757

NA
AMD Opteron 1222 NA
AMD Phenom II P860 Triple-Core

1,756

NA
Intel Xeon W3503 @ 2.40GHz $16.22*
Intel Core2 Duo P9500 @ 2.53GHz

1,753

$998.99*
Intel Xeon 5150 @ 2.66GHz $139.95
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GE-7060

1,752

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8135 @ 2.66GHz NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9600 @ 2.53GHz

1,745

$99.00*
AMD E2-9010 NA
Intel Core i7-660UM @ 1. 33GHz

1,745

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 250 $38.95
Intel Core2 Duo P8800 @ 2.66GHz

1,741

$56.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T9400 @ 2.53GHz $69.95*
Intel Pentium E5700 @ 3.00GHz

1,736

$14.99*
Intel Celeron 1037U @ 1.80GHz NA
Intel Celeron N2940 @ 1.83GHz

1,731

NA
AMD A6-9210 NA
Intel Pentium B940 @ 2.00GHz

1,728

$29.94*
Intel Core2 Duo E7300 @ 2.66GHz $39.88*
AMD Phenom II P840 Triple-Core

1,722

NA
Intel Core i3-2340UE @ 1.30GHz NA
Intel Celeron B840 @ 1.90GHz

1,719

NA
AMD A6-9200 NA
Intel Pentium B950 @ 2.10GHz

1,718

NA
Intel Celeron G530T @ 2. 00GHz NA
AMD Phenom II N640 Dual-Core

1,716

$64.95*
Intel Core2 Duo E6750 @ 2.66GHz $10.30*
AMD Athlon 7850 Dual-Core

1,713

$209.65*
AMD Sempron 3850 APU $62.00
AMD Athlon II X2 B22

1,711

$41.69*
Intel Core i7-680UM @ 1.47GHz NA
AMD Phenom II X2 B53

1,709

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 245e $80.00*
Intel Core i3-2367M @ 1.40GHz

1,707

NA
AMD Phenom 8600 Triple-Core $52.99*
Intel Pentium E6300 @ 2.80GHz

1,705

$10.30*
Intel Celeron U1900 @ 1.99GHz NA
Intel Celeron 3755U @ 1.70GHz

1,702

NA
AMD Opteron 2220 $758.84
Intel Core i3-3229Y @ 1. 40GHz

1,700

NA
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GE-4060 NA
Intel Pentium 3556U @ 1.70GHz

1,696

NA
AMD Athlon X2 250 NA
AMD Athlon II X2 240e

1,695

$34.95*
Intel Core2 Duo E6700 @ 2.66GHz $29.99*
Intel Atom x5-Z8500 @ 1.44GHz

1,692

$62.57*
Intel Core2 Duo X7360 @ 2.53GHz NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X7900 @ 2.80GHz

1,681

NA
Intel Pentium 3558U @ 1.70GHz NA
AMD Phenom II N620 Dual-Core

1,680

$3.99*
Intel Core i3-2365M @ 1.40GHz NA
Intel Celeron 1000M @ 1.80GHz

1,676

NA
Intel Core2 Duo SP9400 @ 2.40GHz $284.00*
Intel Celeron 3855U @ 1.60GHz

1,673

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9300 @ 2. 50GHz $57.99*
AMD A4-3420 APU

1,670

NA
AMD Athlon X2 240e NA
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M640

1,669

NA
AMD Phenom 8250 Triple-Core NA
AMD A6-7000

1,667

NA
Intel Celeron G1101 @ 2.27GHz $19.77*
Intel Celeron N3160 @ 1.60GHz

1,664

$309.88
Intel Core i5-560UM @ 1.33GHz NA
AMD QC-4000

1,663

NA
AMD E2-9000 NA
AMD Athlon II X2 245

1,661

$34.95*
AMD Athlon II X2 235e $181.88*
Intel Celeron N3150 @ 1.60GHz

1,655

NA
Intel Pentium 2117U @ 1.80GHz $134.00*
AMD Opteron 1220

1,653

NA
Intel Core i7-640UM @ 1. 20GHz NA
Intel Xeon 5140 @ 2.33GHz

1,644

$46.99*
AMD Athlon II X2 240 $34.95
AMD E2-3800 APU

1,642

NA
AMD A6-4400M APU $7.99*
AMD A6-9220e

1,639

NA
Intel Pentium E5500 @ 2.80GHz $19.95*
Intel Celeron 3215U @ 1.70GHz

1,635

NA
AMD Phenom 8400 Triple-Core NA
AMD Athlon II X2 220

1,632

$32.19
Intel Celeron 3965Y @ 1.50GHz $107.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E7200 @ 2.53GHz

1,629

$49.00*
Intel Celeron N2930 @ 1.83GHz NA
AMD Athlon X2 255

1,627

NA
Intel Core2 Duo P8700 @ 2.53GHz $37.99*
Intel Atom x5-E8000 @ 1.04GHz

1,623

NA
AMD Phenom 8250e Triple-Core $46. 99*
Intel Celeron J1850 @ 1.99GHz

1,617

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 4400e NA
AMD A6 PRO-7050B APU

1,616

NA
Athlon 64 Dual Core 5400+ NA
AMD A4-4300M APU

1,611

$39.86
Intel Celeron 2002E @ 1.50GHz $86.00*
Intel Pentium A1018 @ 2.10GHz

1,605

NA
AMD Phenom II P820 Triple-Core NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6000+

1,603

$48.95
AMD Athlon X2 240 NA
Intel Pentium E5400 @ 2.70GHz

1,600

$19.99*
Intel Xeon 5133 @ 2.20GHz NA
AMD Phenom II P650 Dual-Core

1,597

$35.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T7800 @ 2.60GHz $607.99*
AMD Opteron 2218

1,594

$32. 42*
Intel Celeron 2980U @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD A4-3400 APU

1,592

$87.95
Intel Xeon 5148 @ 2.33GHz $13.13*
AMD Turion II N530 Dual-Core

1,583

$30.00*
AMD R-260H APU NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-62 Dual Core

1,573

NA
AMD Athlon 7750 Dual-Core $201.71
AMD Athlon II X2 215

1,570

$11.99*
Intel Xeon 3085 @ 3.00GHz NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9300 @ 2.26GHz

1,564

NA
AMD Athlon II N370 Dual-Core NA
Intel Core i3-2357M @ 1.30GHz

1,556

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6600 @ 2.40GHz $14.99*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 5600+

1,548

NA
AMD A4 Micro-6400T APU NA
AMD Athlon X2 215

1,543

NA
Intel Celeron J4005 @ 2. 00GHz $140.51*
Intel Pentium E5300 @ 2.60GHz

1,538

$22.99
Intel Core2 Duo P8600 @ 2.40GHz $49.18*
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M660

1,533

NA
AMD A6-1450 APU NA
AMD Athlon II X2 225

1,526

NA
Intel Celeron 2981U @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Celeron 1017U @ 1.60GHz

1,521

NA
AMD Turion II N550 Dual-Core NA
Intel Xeon 3065 @ 2.33GHz

1,520

$20.90*
Intel Core2 Duo E8135 @ 2.40GHz NA
Intel Pentium N3510 @ 1.99GHz

1,519

NA
Intel Xeon 3060 @ 2.40GHz $22.99*
Intel Core2 Duo P7550 @ 2.26GHz

1,518

$229.99*
AMD Opteron 2216 $24.80
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5800+

1,516

$24. 99*
AMD E2-9030 NA
Intel Celeron B830 @ 1.80GHz

1,515

NA
AMD Turion II P560 Dual-Core NA
AMD Sempron X2 190

1,512

$83.44*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 5000+ NA
AMD Athlon II X2 4450e

1,504

NA
Intel Atom E3845 @ 1.91GHz NA
Intel Celeron N2920 @ 1.86GHz

1,500

NA
AMD A4-3300 APU $12.99
Intel Core2 Duo E6550 @ 2.33GHz

1,498

$14.95*
Intel Celeron 3205U @ 1.50GHz $287.04*
AMD GX-412HC

1,497

NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-74 $499.50*
Intel Pentium E5200 @ 2.50GHz

1,486

$89.95*
AMD Athlon II X2 210e NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5600+

1,485

$139. 95
Intel Core2 Duo E4700 @ 2.60GHz $26.99*
AMD A6-5345M APU

1,476

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T8300 @ 2.40GHz $108.95*
AMD Opteron 285

1,470

NA
AMD Athlon 7550 Dual-Core $60.00
AMD Opteron 1218

1,468

NA
AMD Opteron 290 $135.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E6540 @ 2.33GHz

1,458

NA
Intel Core2 Duo P8400 @ 2.26GHz $297.01*
Intel Celeron E3500 @ 2.70GHz

1,454

$39.99*
AMD TurionX2 Ultra DualCore Mobile ZM-85 NA
Intel Core2 Duo P7570 @ 2.26GHz

1,452

NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5400+ $52.99*
AMD Athlon 7450 Dual-Core

1,448

NA
AMD Opteron 1218 HE NA
Intel Celeron N4000 @ 1. 10GHz

1,439

$107.00*
Intel Celeron E3400 @ 2.60GHz $48.15*
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GP-7730

1,435

NA
Intel Celeron 2957U @ 1.40GHz NA
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M620

1,433

NA
AMD Turion II P540 Dual-Core $49.95*
Intel Celeron B820 @ 1.70GHz

1,429

$39.29*
Intel Celeron B810 @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD Athlon X2 440

1,424

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T7700 @ 2.40GHz $139.95*
Intel Celeron 2955U @ 1.40GHz

1,420

NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5400B NA
Intel Core2 Duo P7450 @ 2.13GHz

1,417

$39.99*
AMD Opteron 2214 HE NA
AMD Sempron X2 198 Dual-Core

1,413

NA
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M600 $17. 81*
Intel Xeon E5205 @ 1.86GHz

1,401

$9.42*
AMD Opteron 2220 SE $25.00*
Intel Xeon E5503 @ 2.00GHz

1,396

$287.01*
Intel Pentium 997 @ 1.60GHz NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4850B

1,391

NA
Intel Celeron 1007U @ 1.50GHz $184.99*
AMD E2-3200 APU

1,386

$7.99*
Intel Celeron E3300 @ 2.50GHz $64.99
Intel Core2 Duo E4600 @ 2.40GHz

1,384

$157.95*
Intel Celeron E3200 @ 2.40GHz $51.99*
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5200+

1,381

$139.95
Intel Core2 Duo T7600 @ 2.33GHz NA
Intel Pentium P6300 @ 2.27GHz

1,380

NA
Intel Xeon E5502 @ 1.87GHz $95.00*
Intel Core i5-540UM @ 1. 20GHz

1,375

NA
Athlon 64 Dual Core 4800+ NA
Intel Xeon 5130 @ 2.00GHz

1,366

$31.46*
Intel Celeron B815 @ 1.60GHz NA
VIA QuadCore L4700 @ 1.2+ GHz

1,363

NA
AMD Turion II Neo N54L Dual-Core NA
Intel Core2 Duo T6600 @ 2.20GHz

1,361

$18.90*
AMD Opteron 185 NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6420 @ 2.13GHz

1,360

$49.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T6670 @ 2.20GHz NA
AMD Turion II P520 Dual-Core

1,359

NA
AMD Opteron 2214 $29.00*
Intel Core i5-520UM @ 1.07GHz

1,356

NA
AMD E2-9000e NA
AMD Athlon II X2 4300e

1,350

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 270u $67. 67*
Intel Pentium P6200 @ 2.13GHz

1,349

$44.95*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5050e $60.00*
Intel Celeron P4600 @ 2.00GHz

1,342

NA
Intel Core i5-430UM @ 1.20GHz NA
Intel Xeon L3406 @ 2.27GHz

1,338

$277.01*
AMD Turion II Dual-Core Mobile M540 NA
Intel Core2 Duo L9600 @ 2.13GHz

1,335

NA
Intel Pentium T4500 @ 2.30GHz NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X7850 @ 2.80GHz

1,331

NA
Intel Pentium E2220 @ 2.40GHz $157.95*
Athlon Dual Core 4850e

1,327

NA
Intel Pentium P6100 @ 2.00GHz $12.00*
Intel Core i7-620UM @ 1.07GHz

1,323

NA
AMD Athlon II P360 Dual-Core $24.00*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5200B

1,316

NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5000+ $331. 49*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4850e

1,313

$39.00*
AMD Opteron 1216 $54.85*
AMD Opteron 1212 HE

1,308

NA
AMD Turion II Dual-Core Mobile M520 $69.10*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5600B

1,304

NA
Intel Xeon 3050 @ 2.13GHz $157.95*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5000B

1,300

$95.00*
AMD Opteron 1214 HE NA
Intel Core2 Duo P7370 @ 2.00GHz

1,298

NA
Intel Celeron G470 @ 2.00GHz NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-86

1,297

$55.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T8100 @ 2.10GHz $999.99*
AMD Turion II Dual-Core Mobile M500

1,293

NA
AMD Athlon 5000 Dual-Core $119.95
Intel Core2 Duo P7350 @ 2. 00GHz

1,291

$19.99*
AMD Opteron 275 $64.99
Intel Celeron 877 @ 1.40GHz

1,290

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6400 @ 2.13GHz $29.95*
AMD A4-3310MX APU

1,287

NA
AMD A6-4455M APU NA
Intel Core2 Duo T6500 @ 2.10GHz

1,286

$14.99*
AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ $308.95*
Intel Xeon 3040 @ 1.86GHz

1,284

$25.04*
Intel Pentium T4400 @ 2.20GHz NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-60 Dual Core

1,282

NA
Intel Celeron 887 @ 1.50GHz NA
Intel Atom Z3775D @ 1.49GHz

1,278

NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3500 @ 2.10GHz NA
Intel Celeron B800 @ 1.50GHz

1,274

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T7500 @ 2. 20GHz $42.99*
AMD Opteron 2212

1,270

$20.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E4500 @ 2.20GHz $6.00*
Intel Atom x5-Z8350 @ 1.44GHz

1,267

$21.00*
Intel Pentium 3560Y @ 1.20GHz NA
AMD Athlon 5200 Dual-Core

1,266

$29.99*
Intel Atom Z3775 @ 1.46GHz $35.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T6570 @ 2.10GHz

1,257

$38.50*
Intel Celeron E1600 @ 2.40GHz NA
AMD GX-222GC SOC

1,255

NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4800+ $459.95
AMD A4-3320M APU

1,253

$35.90
AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core BE-2450 NA
Intel Core2 Duo SL9400 @ 1.86GHz

1,251

$253.00*
AMD Athlon II P340 Dual-Core $44.95*
AMD Athlon II N350 Dual-Core

1,249

NA
Intel Xeon 5120 @ 1. 86GHz $1,619.99
Intel Core2 Duo T7400 @ 2.16GHz

1,246

NA
Intel Atom Z3770 @ 1.46GHz $149.44*
Intel Pentium P6000 @ 1.87GHz

1,243

NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-85 $45.00*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 3800+

1,234

NA
AMD Opteron 180 $129.95
Intel Pentium T4300 @ 2.10GHz

1,232

NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-87 $39.95*
Intel Pentium 987 @ 1.50GHz

1,230

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T6400 @ 2.00GHz $14.99*
AMD Sempron X2 180

1,222

$69.40*
AMD A4-3305M APU $30.81
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4600+

1,219

$359.95
AMD Athlon II P320 Dual-Core $29. 95
AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core BE-2400

1,213

NA
AMD A4-3330MX APU NA
Intel Core2 Duo T5900 @ 2.20GHz

1,212

NA
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GS-5560 NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-84

1,209

$18.99*
Dual-Core AMD Opteron 1220 SE NA
Athlon Dual Core 4450e

1,204

NA
Intel Pentium E2200 @ 2.20GHz $75.00*
Intel Celeron N2910 @ 1.60GHz

1,203

NA
Intel Celeron J3355 @ 2.00GHz NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3300 @ 2.00GHz

1,201

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T5850 @ 2.16GHz $15.90*
Intel Atom x5-Z8300 @ 1.44GHz

1,194

$132.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T7300 @ 2.00GHz $30.99*
AMD Opteron 1214

1,191

$290. 00*
Intel Celeron 1047UE @ 1.40GHz NA
AMD Turion II Neo K685 Dual-Core

1,186

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6320 @ 1.86GHz $49.99*
AMD A4-3300M APU

1,185

$29.99*
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GP-5000 NA
Intel Celeron E1500 @ 2.20GHz

1,180

$19.65
AMD Opteron 280 $796.67*
AMD A4-4355M APU

1,175

NA
Intel Pentium E2210 @ 2.20GHz NA
VIA QuadCore U4650 @ 1.0+ GHz

1,173

NA
Intel Celeron 867 @ 1.30GHz $29.99*
AMD Opteron 1216 HE

1,172

NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3100 @ 1.90GHz NA
AMD Opteron 270

1,170

$607.47*
Intel Core2 Duo T7200 @ 2.00GHz $99. 95*
AMD Opteron 175

1,167

NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4450B $31.00*
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-68

1,162

$90.00*
Intel Atom E3840 @ 1.91GHz NA
Intel Core i3-380UM @ 1.33GHz

1,160

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E4400 @ 2.00GHz $49.99*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 4200+

1,156

$204.95*
Intel Pentium 967 @ 1.30GHz NA
AMD Athlon II N330 Dual-Core

1,154

NA
Intel Pentium T4200 @ 2.00GHz $12.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T5870 @ 2.00GHz

1,150

NA
AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-77 NA
Intel Pentium 977 @ 1.40GHz

1,148

NA
VIA Eden X4 C4250 @ 1.2+GHz NA
Intel Celeron 857 @ 1. 20GHz

1,146

NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4400+ $60.00
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-66

1,141

$378.00*
AMD Athlon II Dual-Core M320 $30.00*
AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-75

1,137

NA
Intel Core2 Duo U9600 @ 1.60GHz NA
Intel Celeron P4500 @ 1.87GHz

1,119

NA
Intel Core2 Duo L7800 @ 2.00GHz NA
AMD GX-218GL SOC

1,115

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T7250 @ 2.00GHz $201.48*
Intel Core2 Duo T5800 @ 2.00GHz

1,114

NA
Intel Pentium T3400 @ 2.16GHz $89.95*
AMD Athlon II Dual-Core M300

1,112

NA
Intel Celeron 2961Y @ 1.10GHz NA
AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core BE-2350

1,109

NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6300 @ 1. 86GHz $12.99*
AMD Athlon64 X2 Dual Core 4600+

1,108

NA
AMD Athlon II X2 260u $83.44*
AMD GX-217GA SOC

1,107

NA
Intel Celeron N3350 @ 1.10GHz NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4450e

1,105

NA
AMD E2-3000 APU NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+

1,097

$199.95
AMD Opteron 170 NA
AMD E2-3000M APU

1,096

$20.00*
Intel Pentium 957 @ 1.20GHz $134.00*
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core BE-230

1,095

NA
Intel Core2 Duo T5750 @ 2.00GHz $9.99*
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-64

1,092

$39.39*
Intel Pentium E2180 @ 2.00GHz $29.99
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-62

1,087

$311. 00*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4050e NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3000 @ 1.80GHz

1,085

NA
AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-72 $224.26*
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-82

1,084

NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core BE-2300 NA
AMD Sempron Dual Core 4900

1,081

NA
Intel Core i5-470UM @ 1.33GHz NA
Intel Xeon 5110 @ 1.60GHz

1,079

$159.95*
PassMark Software © 2008-2019
PassMark — Price Performance (CPU Mark / $Price)
Low Mid Range CPUs — Updated 30th of May 2019
Processor PassMark CPU Mark Score / Price Price (USD)
Intel Core i7-2630UM @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-560M @ 2. 67GHz $60.00
Intel Celeron G1620 @ 2.70GHz

16.78

$153.59*
AMD Athlon II X3 445 $91.00*
AMD Athlon X3 435

26.96

$95.49*
AMD Phenom 9600B Quad-Core $147.19*
Intel Pentium G3220T @ 2.60GHz

36.76

$69.99*
AMD A8-6410 APU NA NA
Intel Core i3-530 @ 2.93GHz $189.00
AMD Athlon II X3 440

95.09

$26.99*
Intel Pentium G840 @ 2.80GHz $34.99*
AMD A4-6250J APU NA NA
AMD A9-9410 NA NA
Intel Xeon X5270 @ 3.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core i7-610E @ 2.53GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G1830 @ 2.80GHz

26.80

$94.95
AMD Phenom 9550 Quad-Core $28. 99*
Intel Core i3-2328M @ 2.20GHz

27.36

$92.97
Intel Atom C3558 @ 2.20GHz $86.00*
AMD A9-9425 NA NA
Intel Core i3-2330M @ 2.20GHz

14.83

$170.20
Intel Core2 Quad Q9000 @ 2.00GHz $389.00*
AMD A9-9430 NA NA
AMD Phenom II N970 Quad-Core

16.83

$149.99*
Intel Pentium G640 @ 2.80GHz $150.00
Intel Pentium 3825U @ 1.90GHz NA NA
AMD A4-7210 APU NA NA
AMD Phenom FX-5000 Quad-Core NA NA
AMD PRO A6-8500B NA NA
Intel Xeon E5335 @ 2.00GHz

141.45

$17.77*
AMD Embedded G-Series GX-420GI Radeon R7E NA NA
Intel Core i3-4030Y @ 1. 60GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X4 605e NA NA
Pentium Dual-Core E6000 @ 3.46GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-4300Y @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G1820T @ 2.40GHz $42.00*
Intel Celeron G1630 @ 2.80GHz

35.63

$69.99
AMD GX-424CC SOC NA NA
Intel Celeron G1610 @ 2.60GHz $299.95
Intel Pentium G2030T @ 2.60GHz

38.86

$64.00*
Intel Core i5 E 520 @ 2.40GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II N950 Quad-Core $112.60*
Intel Core i7-2610UE @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core M-5Y51 @ 1.10GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X3 435

14.55

$169.95
Intel Core i3-3227U @ 1.90GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon X5260 @ 3. 33GHz $54.00
AMD A6-6310 APU NA NA
Intel Atom C3538 @ 2.10GHz

32.73

$75.00*
Intel Core i5-540M @ 2.53GHz $189.95
AMD Athlon II X4 600e

18.84

$130.23*
AMD Phenom II X3 710 $84.53*
Intel Core i3-4005U @ 1.70GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-4010U @ 1.70GHz

8.44

$289.00
AMD A6-5200 APU NA NA
Intel Core i3-2310M @ 2.10GHz $38.81
Intel Xeon E3113 @ 3.00GHz

247.99

$9.79*
Intel Xeon E5240 @ 3.00GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G555 @ 2.70GHz $40.00*
Intel Pentium Silver N5000 @ 1.10GHz

15.04

$161.00*
Intel Pentium G2020T @ 2.50GHz $47.60*
Intel Xeon E7320 @ 2. 13GHz NA NA
AMD GX-420CA SOC NA NA
Intel Celeron 3965U @ 2.20GHz

22.54

$107.00*
Intel Pentium 2030M @ 2.50GHz $134.00*
AMD Embedded R-Series RX-216GD NA NA
Intel Core i5-4200Y @ 1.40GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-480M @ 2.67GHz

29.81

$80.60*
AMD A4 PRO-3340B NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8600 @ 3.33GHz $42.45
AMD Athlon X3 455 NA NA
Intel Xeon X5272 @ 3.40GHz

17.10

$140.00*
Intel Pentium G3320TE @ 2.30GHz NA NA
AMD PRO A6-8530B NA NA
AMD A6-6420K APU $149.99*
Intel Core M-5Y10a @ 0.80GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-2332M @ 2. 20GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-4210Y @ 1.50GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X4 8700e NA NA
Intel Core i3-2312M @ 2.10GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium G630 @ 2.70GHz

23.73

$100.00*
AMD A8-3510MX APU NA NA
Intel Core i5-520M @ 2.40GHz $59.99
Intel Xeon E5603 @ 1.60GHz

18.34

$129.04*
AMD Opteron X3216 APU NA NA
AMD A8-3530MX APU NA NA
Intel Celeron 2000E @ 2.20GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8290 @ 2.83GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G1620T @ 2.40GHz $42.00*
AMD A4 PRO-7300B APU NA NA
AMD A9-9420 NA NA
Intel Celeron N4100 @ 1.10GHz

21. 78

$107.00*
AMD A4-6320 APU $69.99*
Intel Core i5-460M @ 2.53GHz

31.01

$74.95*
AMD A9-9400 NA NA
AMD Phenom 9350e Quad-Core $3,382.07*
Intel Core i5-2467M @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X3 425

85.86

$26.99*
AMD Opteron 1352 $135.99*
AMD Athlon X3 445 NA NA
Intel Celeron 2970M @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD A6-6400K APU

22.16

$104.13*
Intel Core i5-4220Y @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 9600 Quad-Core $49.95
AMD A4-7300 APU

21.33

$107.99
Intel Core i3-3217U @ 1.80GHz $229.99*
AMD Athlon X2 280

68.77

$33.49*
Intel Pentium G620 @ 2. 60GHz $24.99*
Intel Pentium G645T @ 2.50GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G550 @ 2.60GHz

28.63

$80.00
Intel Xeon E5320 @ 1.86GHz $38.75*
Intel Celeron G1610T @ 2.30GHz

57.12

$40.04*
AMD Athlon II X3 420e $116.15*
AMD E2-7110 APU NA NA
AMD Opteron 2376

13.69

$166.81*
Intel Core2 Duo E8500 @ 3.16GHz $39.99*
AMD A6-6400B APU NA NA
Intel Xeon L5310 @ 1.60GHz

20.22

$112.50*
AMD Phenom II N930 Quad-Core $129.95*
AMD PRO A4-3350B APU NA NA
Intel Pentium 2020M @ 2.40GHz

16.97

$134.00*
Intel Xeon L3110 @ 3.00GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon L5240 @ 3. 00GHz $31.40*
Intel Pentium 3560M @ 2.40GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium 3550M @ 2.30GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-4202Y @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon E5310 @ 1.60GHz

46.22

$49.00*
Intel Atom C2550 @ 2.40GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium J4205 @ 1.50GHz NA NA
AMD Opteron 8354 $24.00
Intel Core i7-640LM @ 2.13GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 370K Dual Core NA NA
AMD Athlon II X3 415e

29.97

$75.00*
AMD Opteron 2393 SE NA NA
Intel Core i5-520 @ 2.40GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X3 700e NA NA
Intel Xeon E3120 @ 3.16GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X3 425e NA NA
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GP-9600 NA NA
AMD A6-5400B APU $105. 04*
Intel Celeron 1020E @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X3 705e

14.63

$152.34*
AMD A4 PRO-7350B NA NA
Intel Pentium 4415Y @ 1.60GHz $161.00*
AMD Phenom II X2 565

74.12

$29.99*
AMD A4-6300 APU $59.99*
Intel Core i5-3339Y @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-4020Y @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8700 @ 3.50GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GE-5560 NA NA
AMD Phenom 9500 Quad-Core

76.03

$28.99*
AMD A6-8500P NA NA
AMD A6-3430MX APU NA NA
Intel Core i5 750S @ 2.40GHz $99.99*
Intel Celeron G540 @ 2.50GHz

48.79

$45. 00*
AMD Athlon X3 425 NA NA
AMD Phenom II X620 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Core i3-390M @ 2.67GHz $38.95*
HP Hexa-Core 2.0GHz

4.32

$504.27*
AMD A8-3520M APU NA NA
Intel Atom C2558 @ 2.40GHz $136.00*
AMD A4-6210 APU NA NA
AMD A6-9220 NA NA
Intel Core i3-4012Y @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-3217UE @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon E3110 @ 3.00GHz

93.86

$22.99*
AMD A6-5400K APU $99.00
AMD A6-9225 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8400 @ 3.00GHz

47.82

$44.95
AMD A6-9220C NA NA
AMD A4-5300B APU $38.00*
Intel Xeon L5320 @ 1. 86GHz

30.52

$69.99*
Intel Pentium G6951 @ 2.80GHz $94.00*
Intel Celeron G1820TE @ 2.20GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9900 @ 3.06GHz

5.34

$398.95*
Intel Celeron G530 @ 2.40GHz $39.99*
AMD Athlon II X2 280

21.30

$99.99*
AMD A4-6300B APU $100.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E8335 @ 2.93GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-450M @ 2.40GHz

66.59

$31.95*
Intel Core2 Duo E8435 @ 3.06GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron J3455 @ 1.50GHz $369.99
AMD A8-4555M APU NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 B59

108.77

$19.48*
Intel Celeron G540T @ 2.10GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 9150e Quad-Core $39. 95*
AMD A4-5050 APU NA NA
AMD Sempron 240

36.39

$58.00
Intel Xeon E3-1220L v3 @ 1.10GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 5150 APU $159.95
AMD Phenom II X2 511 NA NA
AMD A6-9230 NA NA
Intel Core i5-430M @ 2.27GHz

14.99

$139.95
Intel Core i5-2537M @ 1.40GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-380M @ 2.53GHz $209.95
Intel Pentium G630T @ 2.30GHz

26.12

$79.99*
AMD Embedded G-Series GX-224IJ Radeon R4E NA NA
Intel Atom C2538 @ 2.40GHz $104.00*
AMD Athlon II X2 B28

42.52

$49.05*
AMD Phenom II P960 Quad-Core $28.00*
AMD Phenom 8850B Triple-Core NA NA
AMD Athlon X3 440

23. 62

$87.99*
AMD PRO A6-9500B NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 521 NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 570 NA NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X9100 @ 3.06GHz $851.00*
Intel Celeron G550T @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 560

31.70

$64.99*
Intel Pentium 4405Y @ 1.50GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8750 Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Pentium G6960 @ 2.93GHz NA NA
AMD A6-3410MX APU $3.99*
Intel Pentium 4410Y @ 1.50GHz

12.72

$161.00*
AMD Phenom II X2 555 $27.98*
Intel Atom T5700 @ 1.70GHz NA NA
AMD A4-5100 APU NA NA
AMD Phenom 8750B Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Pentium G620T @ 2. 20GHz

25.36

$79.99*
Intel Pentium N4200 @ 1.10GHz $198.40
Intel Pentium B980 @ 2.40GHz

28.98

$69.95*
AMD Phenom 8450e Triple-Core NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 550 $49.99*
AMD Phenom II X640 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9800 @ 2.93GHz

4.77

$423.89*
AMD A4-9125 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9700 @ 2.80GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-370M @ 2.40GHz $39.96*
AMD A6-3500 APU

50.32

$39.99*
AMD A4-5300 APU $141.53
AMD Athlon II X3 400e

18.70

$107.43*
AMD Athlon II X3 405e $79.99*
AMD A6-3420M APU NA NA
Intel Celeron 3867U @ 1. 80GHz

18.69

$107.00*
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GP-9530 NA NA
AMD Phenom II N870 Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8300 @ 2.83GHz $19.99*
Intel Celeron 3765U @ 1.90GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8650 Triple-Core

39.79

$49.99*
Intel Pentium E6800 @ 3.33GHz $89.00*
AMD A8-7050 NA NA
Intel Pentium 3805U @ 1.90GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium G640T @ 2.40GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 270

82.48

$23.99*
Intel Celeron 2950M @ 2.00GHz NA NA
AMD A8-3500M APU $69.95
AMD A10 Micro-6700T APU NA NA
Intel Core i7-610 @ 2.53GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8850 Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E7600 @ 3. 06GHz

16.40

$119.95*
Intel Xeon 5160 @ 3.00GHz $37.49
Intel Pentium B970 @ 2.30GHz

38.41

$50.99*
Intel Pentium J2900 @ 2.41GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8235 @ 2.80GHz NA NA
AMD R-460L APU NA NA
Intel Celeron 4205U @ 1.80GHz $107.00*
Intel Core i7-620LM @ 2.00GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6850 @ 3.00GHz

38.95

$49.99*
AMD A4-9120 NA NA
AMD GX-415GA SOC NA NA
AMD A6-5357M APU NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 250e $76.73*
AMD Phenom II N850 Triple-Core

77.51

$25.00*
Intel Core i3-330E @ 2.13GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium E6700 @ 3. 20GHz $16.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T9600 @ 2.80GHz

21.43

$89.95*
AMD Phenom X3 8550 $169.95*
Intel Pentium N3540 @ 2.16GHz

7.68

$250.87*
AMD Phenom 8600B Triple-Core $52.99*
AMD A4-4020 APU

22.35

$86.00
AMD Phenom II X2 B55 $48.00*
AMD Opteron 2224 SE NA NA
Intel Pentium J3710 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD A4-5000 APU NA NA
Intel Celeron 3865U @ 1.80GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 545

43.52

$43.98*
Intel Celeron 3955U @ 2.00GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 340 Dual Core $49.99*
AMD E2-6110 APU NA NA
AMD A6-5350M APU

44.13

$43. 12
Intel Xeon @ 2.20GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-4010Y @ 1.30GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X9000 @ 2.80GHz $409.95*
VIA QuadCore [email protected] NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 B26

54.28

$34.95
Intel Pentium N3530 @ 2.16GHz NA NA
Intel Atom x7-Z8700 @ 1.60GHz $73.63*
Intel Pentium E5800 @ 3.20GHz

63.12

$29.99*
Intel Core i3-350M @ 2.27GHz $108.95
AMD Athlon II X2 265

22.81

$82.88*
AMD A9-9420e NA NA
AMD Phenom II N830 Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Atom x7-Z8750 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8450 Triple-Core $29.95*
AMD A6-3400M APU

62. 86

$29.97*
Intel Core2 Duo E8200 @ 2.66GHz $49.99*
Intel Core2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz

125.04

$14.99*
AMD Athlon II X2 260 $19.99*
Intel Core2 Extreme X6800 @ 2.93GHz

7.11

$263.64*
Intel Atom E3940 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II P920 Quad-Core $75.00*
Intel Pentium N3710 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9600 @ 2.66GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium E6600 @ 3.06GHz

18.64

$100.00*
Intel Pentium G6950 @ 2.80GHz $39.99*
Intel Atom E3950 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium B960 @ 2.20GHz

37.83

$48.99*
AMD Phenom II N660 Dual-Core $99.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E8335 @ 2.66GHz NA NA
AMD A4-5150M APU NA NA
Intel Xeon W3505 @ 2. 53GHz

74.18

$24.86
AMD Opteron 2222 $1,664.98*
Intel Celeron N3450 @ 1.10GHz

6.22

$295.99
Intel Celeron J1900 @ 1.99GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 255 $65.22*
Intel Xeon 3075 @ 2.66GHz

5.26

$349.95*
Intel Pentium J2850 @ 2.41GHz NA NA
Intel Atom x5-Z8550 @ 1.44GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 9100e Quad-Core $39.95*
AMD A6 Micro-6500T APU NA NA
AMD A4-4000 APU

14.28

$128.27
Intel Pentium N3700 @ 1.60GHz $444.78*
Intel Core i3-2377M @ 1.50GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 B57 NA NA
Intel Xeon L5238 @ 2.66GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II P940 Quad-Core NA NA
Intel Pentium 2127U @ 1. 90GHz

13.58

$134.00*
Intel Celeron 1005M @ 1.90GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 235e NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9550 @ 2.66GHz $298.95*
Intel Core2 Extreme X7800 @ 2.60GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9500 @ 2.60GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-72 NA NA
Intel Celeron J3160 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6400+

6.89

$259.95*
Intel Pentium N3520 @ 2.16GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-330M @ 2.13GHz $159.95*
Intel Xeon 3070 @ 2.66GHz

4.36

$408.95*
AMD Athlon II X2 B24 $34.10
Intel Core i3-2375M @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Atom Z3795 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E7400 @ 2. 80GHz

61.12

$28.99*
Intel Pentium E6500 @ 2.93GHz $157.95*
AMD Embedded G-Series GX-215JJ Radeon R2E NA NA
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GP-9500 NA NA
AMD Opteron 1222 NA NA
AMD Phenom II P860 Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Xeon W3503 @ 2.40GHz

108.25

$16.22*
Intel Core2 Duo P9500 @ 2.53GHz $998.99*
Intel Xeon 5150 @ 2.66GHz

12.52

$139.95
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GE-7060 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E8135 @ 2.66GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9600 @ 2.53GHz $99.00*
AMD E2-9010 NA NA
Intel Core i7-660UM @ 1.33GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 250

44.73

$38. 95
Intel Core2 Duo P8800 @ 2.66GHz $56.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T9400 @ 2.53GHz

24.87

$69.95*
Intel Pentium E5700 @ 3.00GHz $14.99*
Intel Celeron 1037U @ 1.80GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron N2940 @ 1.83GHz NA NA
AMD A6-9210 NA NA
Intel Pentium B940 @ 2.00GHz

57.73

$29.94*
Intel Core2 Duo E7300 @ 2.66GHz $39.88*
AMD Phenom II P840 Triple-Core NA NA
Intel Core i3-2340UE @ 1.30GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron B840 @ 1.90GHz NA NA
AMD A6-9200 NA NA
Intel Pentium B950 @ 2.10GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G530T @ 2.00GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II N640 Dual-Core

26. 42

$64.95*
Intel Core2 Duo E6750 @ 2.66GHz $10.30*
AMD Athlon 7850 Dual-Core

8.17

$209.65*
AMD Sempron 3850 APU $62.00
AMD Athlon II X2 B22

41.05

$41.69*
Intel Core i7-680UM @ 1.47GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II X2 B53 NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 245e $80.00*
Intel Core i3-2367M @ 1.40GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8600 Triple-Core

32.20

$52.99*
Intel Pentium E6300 @ 2.80GHz $10.30*
Intel Celeron U1900 @ 1.99GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron 3755U @ 1.70GHz NA NA
AMD Opteron 2220

2.24

$758.84
Intel Core i3-3229Y @ 1.40GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GE-4060 NA NA
Intel Pentium 3556U @ 1. 70GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 250 NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 240e $34.95*
Intel Core2 Duo E6700 @ 2.66GHz

56.47

$29.99*
Intel Atom x5-Z8500 @ 1.44GHz $62.57*
Intel Core2 Duo X7360 @ 2.53GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X7900 @ 2.80GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium 3558U @ 1.70GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II N620 Dual-Core

421.15

$3.99*
Intel Core i3-2365M @ 1.40GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron 1000M @ 1.80GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo SP9400 @ 2.40GHz $284.00*
Intel Celeron 3855U @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50GHz

28.86

$57.99*
AMD A4-3420 APU NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 240e NA NA
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M640 NA NA
AMD Phenom 8250 Triple-Core NA NA
AMD A6-7000 NA NA
Intel Celeron G1101 @ 2. 27GHz $19.77*
Intel Celeron N3160 @ 1.60GHz

5.37

$309.88
Intel Core i5-560UM @ 1.33GHz NA NA
AMD QC-4000 NA NA
AMD E2-9000 NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 245 $34.95*
AMD Athlon II X2 235e

9.12

$181.88*
Intel Celeron N3150 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium 2117U @ 1.80GHz $134.00*
AMD Opteron 1220 NA NA
Intel Core i7-640UM @ 1.20GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon 5140 @ 2.33GHz

35.00

$46.99*
AMD Athlon II X2 240 $34.95
AMD E2-3800 APU NA NA
AMD A6-4400M APU

205.45

$7.99*
AMD A6-9220e NA NA
Intel Pentium E5500 @ 2. 80GHz $19.95*
Intel Celeron 3215U @ 1.70GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8400 Triple-Core NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 220

50.70

$32.19
Intel Celeron 3965Y @ 1.50GHz $107.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E7200 @ 2.53GHz

33.26

$49.00*
Intel Celeron N2930 @ 1.83GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 255 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P8700 @ 2.53GHz $37.99*
Intel Atom x5-E8000 @ 1.04GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom 8250e Triple-Core

34.45

$46.99*
Intel Celeron J1850 @ 1.99GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 4400e NA NA
AMD A6 PRO-7050B APU NA NA
Athlon 64 Dual Core 5400+ NA NA
AMD A4-4300M APU $39. 86
Intel Celeron 2002E @ 1.50GHz

18.67

$86.00*
Intel Pentium A1018 @ 2.10GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II P820 Triple-Core NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6000+ $48.95
AMD Athlon X2 240 NA NA
Intel Pentium E5400 @ 2.70GHz

80.07

$19.99*
Intel Xeon 5133 @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom II P650 Dual-Core $35.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T7800 @ 2.60GHz

2.62

$607.99*
AMD Opteron 2218 $32.42*
Intel Celeron 2980U @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD A4-3400 APU

18.11

$87.95
Intel Xeon 5148 @ 2.33GHz $13.13*
AMD Turion II N530 Dual-Core

52.78

$30.00*
AMD R-260H APU NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-62 Dual Core NA NA
AMD Athlon 7750 Dual-Core $201. 71
AMD Athlon II X2 215

131.01

$11.99*
Intel Xeon 3085 @ 3.00GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P9300 @ 2.26GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II N370 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Core i3-2357M @ 1.30GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6600 @ 2.40GHz $14.99*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 5600+ NA NA
AMD A4 Micro-6400T APU NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 215 NA NA
Intel Celeron J4005 @ 2.00GHz

10.97

$140.51*
Intel Pentium E5300 @ 2.60GHz $22.99
Intel Core2 Duo P8600 @ 2.40GHz

31.24

$49.18*
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M660 NA NA
AMD A6-1450 APU NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 225 NA NA
Intel Celeron 2981U @ 1. 60GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron 1017U @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Turion II N550 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Xeon 3065 @ 2.33GHz $20.90*
Intel Core2 Duo E8135 @ 2.40GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium N3510 @ 1.99GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon 3060 @ 2.40GHz

66.07

$22.99*
Intel Core2 Duo P7550 @ 2.26GHz $229.99*
AMD Opteron 2216

61.21

$24.80
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5800+ $24.99*
AMD E2-9030 NA NA
Intel Celeron B830 @ 1.80GHz NA NA
AMD Turion II P560 Dual-Core NA NA
AMD Sempron X2 190

18.12

$83.44*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 5000+ NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 4450e NA NA
Intel Atom E3845 @ 1. 91GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron N2920 @ 1.86GHz NA NA
AMD A4-3300 APU $12.99
Intel Core2 Duo E6550 @ 2.33GHz

100.24

$14.95*
Intel Celeron 3205U @ 1.50GHz $287.04*
AMD GX-412HC NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-74

2.99

$499.50*
Intel Pentium E5200 @ 2.50GHz $89.95*
AMD Athlon II X2 210e NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5600+

10.61

$139.95
Intel Core2 Duo E4700 @ 2.60GHz $26.99*
AMD A6-5345M APU NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T8300 @ 2.40GHz

13.51

$108.95*
AMD Opteron 285 NA NA
AMD Athlon 7550 Dual-Core $60.00
AMD Opteron 1218 NA NA
AMD Opteron 290

10. 85

$135.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E6540 @ 2.33GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P8400 @ 2.26GHz $297.01*
Intel Celeron E3500 @ 2.70GHz

36.37

$39.99*
AMD TurionX2 Ultra DualCore Mobile ZM-85 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P7570 @ 2.26GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5400+ $52.99*
AMD Athlon 7450 Dual-Core NA NA
AMD Opteron 1218 HE NA NA
Intel Celeron N4000 @ 1.10GHz

13.46

$107.00*
Intel Celeron E3400 @ 2.60GHz $48.15*
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GP-7730 NA NA
Intel Celeron 2957U @ 1.40GHz NA NA
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M620 NA NA
AMD Turion II P540 Dual-Core

28. 63

$49.95*
Intel Celeron B820 @ 1.70GHz $39.29*
Intel Celeron B810 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 440 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T7700 @ 2.40GHz

10.17

$139.95*
Intel Celeron 2955U @ 1.40GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5400B NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P7450 @ 2.13GHz $39.99*
AMD Opteron 2214 HE NA NA
AMD Sempron X2 198 Dual-Core NA NA
AMD Turion II Ultra Dual-Core Mobile M600

78.98

$17.81*
Intel Xeon E5205 @ 1.86GHz $9.42*
AMD Opteron 2220 SE

55.92

$25.00*
Intel Xeon E5503 @ 2.00GHz $287.01*
Intel Pentium 997 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4850B NA NA
Intel Celeron 1007U @ 1. 50GHz

7.51

$184.99*
AMD E2-3200 APU $7.99*
Intel Celeron E3300 @ 2.50GHz

21.33

$64.99
Intel Core2 Duo E4600 @ 2.40GHz $157.95*
Intel Celeron E3200 @ 2.40GHz

26.62

$51.99*
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5200+ $139.95
Intel Core2 Duo T7600 @ 2.33GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium P6300 @ 2.27GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon E5502 @ 1.87GHz

14.51

$95.00*
Intel Core i5-540UM @ 1.20GHz NA NA
Athlon 64 Dual Core 4800+ NA NA
Intel Xeon 5130 @ 2.00GHz $31.46*
Intel Celeron B815 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
VIA QuadCore L4700 @ 1.2+ GHz NA NA
AMD Turion II Neo N54L Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T6600 @ 2. 20GHz

72.04

$18.90*
AMD Opteron 185 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6420 @ 2.13GHz $49.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T6670 @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD Turion II P520 Dual-Core NA NA
AMD Opteron 2214

46.85

$29.00*
Intel Core i5-520UM @ 1.07GHz NA NA
AMD E2-9000e NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 4300e NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 270u $67.67*
Intel Pentium P6200 @ 2.13GHz

30.03

$44.95*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5050e $60.00*
Intel Celeron P4600 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
Intel Core i5-430UM @ 1.20GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon L3406 @ 2.27GHz

4.83

$277.01*
AMD Turion II Dual-Core Mobile M540 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo L9600 @ 2. 13GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium T4500 @ 2.30GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Extreme X7850 @ 2.80GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium E2220 @ 2.40GHz $157.95*
Athlon Dual Core 4850e NA NA
Intel Pentium P6100 @ 2.00GHz

110.50

$12.00*
Intel Core i7-620UM @ 1.07GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II P360 Dual-Core $24.00*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5200B NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5000+

3.96

$331.49*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4850e $39.00*
AMD Opteron 1216

23.91

$54.85*
AMD Opteron 1212 HE NA NA
AMD Turion II Dual-Core Mobile M520 $69.10*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5600B NA NA
Intel Xeon 3050 @ 2. 13GHz

8.23

$157.95*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 5000B $95.00*
AMD Opteron 1214 HE NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo P7370 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron G470 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-86

23.58

$55.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T8100 @ 2.10GHz $999.99*
AMD Turion II Dual-Core Mobile M500 NA NA
AMD Athlon 5000 Dual-Core

10.78

$119.95
Intel Core2 Duo P7350 @ 2.00GHz $19.99*
AMD Opteron 275

19.87

$64.99
Intel Celeron 877 @ 1.40GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6400 @ 2.13GHz $29.95*
AMD A4-3310MX APU NA NA
AMD A6-4455M APU NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T6500 @ 2. 10GHz

85.82

$14.99*
AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ $308.95*
Intel Xeon 3040 @ 1.86GHz

51.31

$25.04*
Intel Pentium T4400 @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 FX-60 Dual Core NA NA
Intel Celeron 887 @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Atom Z3775D @ 1.49GHz NA NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3500 @ 2.10GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron B800 @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T7500 @ 2.20GHz $42.99*
AMD Opteron 2212

63.53

$20.00*
Intel Core2 Duo E4500 @ 2.20GHz $6.00*
Intel Atom x5-Z8350 @ 1.44GHz

60.36

$21.00*
Intel Pentium 3560Y @ 1.20GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 5200 Dual-Core $29. 99*
Intel Atom Z3775 @ 1.46GHz

35.98

$35.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T6570 @ 2.10GHz $38.50*
Intel Celeron E1600 @ 2.40GHz NA NA
AMD GX-222GC SOC NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4800+

2.73

$459.95
AMD A4-3320M APU $35.90
AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core BE-2450 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo SL9400 @ 1.86GHz

4.95

$253.00*
AMD Athlon II P340 Dual-Core $44.95*
AMD Athlon II N350 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Xeon 5120 @ 1.86GHz

0.77

$1,619.99
Intel Core2 Duo T7400 @ 2.16GHz NA NA
Intel Atom Z3770 @ 1.46GHz $149.44*
Intel Pentium P6000 @ 1.87GHz NA NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-85

27. 43

$45.00*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 3800+ NA NA
AMD Opteron 180 $129.95
Intel Pentium T4300 @ 2.10GHz NA NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-87

30.86

$39.95*
Intel Pentium 987 @ 1.50GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T6400 @ 2.00GHz $14.99*
AMD Sempron X2 180

17.62

$69.40*
AMD A4-3305M APU $30.81
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4600+

3.39

$359.95
AMD Athlon II P320 Dual-Core $29.95
AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core BE-2400 NA NA
AMD A4-3330MX APU NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T5900 @ 2.20GHz NA NA
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core GS-5560 NA NA
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-84

63. 72

$18.99*
Dual-Core AMD Opteron 1220 SE NA NA
Athlon Dual Core 4450e NA NA
Intel Pentium E2200 @ 2.20GHz $75.00*
Intel Celeron N2910 @ 1.60GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron J3355 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3300 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T5850 @ 2.16GHz

75.33

$15.90*
Intel Atom x5-Z8300 @ 1.44GHz $132.99*
Intel Core2 Duo T7300 @ 2.00GHz

38.48

$30.99*
AMD Opteron 1214 $290.00*
Intel Celeron 1047UE @ 1.40GHz NA NA
AMD Turion II Neo K685 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6320 @ 1.86GHz

23.72

$49.99*
AMD A4-3300M APU $29.99*
AMD Phenom X2 Dual-Core GP-5000 NA NA
Intel Celeron E1500 @ 2. 20GHz

60.07

$19.65
AMD Opteron 280 $796.67*
AMD A4-4355M APU NA NA
Intel Pentium E2210 @ 2.20GHz NA NA
VIA QuadCore U4650 @ 1.0+ GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron 867 @ 1.30GHz

39.12

$29.99*
AMD Opteron 1216 HE NA NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3100 @ 1.90GHz NA NA
AMD Opteron 270 $607.47*
Intel Core2 Duo T7200 @ 2.00GHz

11.69

$99.95*
AMD Opteron 175 NA NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4450B $31.00*
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-68

12.92

$90.00*
Intel Atom E3840 @ 1.91GHz NA NA
Intel Core i3-380UM @ 1.33GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E4400 @ 2. 00GHz $49.99*
Athlon 64 Dual Core 4200+

5.64

$204.95*
Intel Pentium 967 @ 1.30GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon II N330 Dual-Core NA NA
Intel Pentium T4200 @ 2.00GHz $12.00*
Intel Core2 Duo T5870 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-77 NA NA
Intel Pentium 977 @ 1.40GHz NA NA
VIA Eden X4 C4250 @ 1.2+GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron 857 @ 1.20GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4400+

19.10

$60.00
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-66 $378.00*
AMD Athlon II Dual-Core M320

38.05

$30.00*
AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-75 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo U9600 @ 1. 60GHz NA NA
Intel Celeron P4500 @ 1.87GHz NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo L7800 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
AMD GX-218GL SOC NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T7250 @ 2.00GHz $201.48*
Intel Core2 Duo T5800 @ 2.00GHz NA NA
Intel Pentium T3400 @ 2.16GHz

12.38

$89.95*
AMD Athlon II Dual-Core M300 NA NA
Intel Celeron 2961Y @ 1.10GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core BE-2350 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo E6300 @ 1.86GHz $12.99*
AMD Athlon64 X2 Dual Core 4600+ NA NA
AMD Athlon II X2 260u

13.28

$83.44*
AMD GX-217GA SOC NA NA
Intel Celeron N3350 @ 1.10GHz NA NA
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4450e NA NA
AMD E2-3000 APU NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+ $199. 95
AMD Opteron 170 NA NA
AMD E2-3000M APU

54.84

$20.00*
Intel Pentium 957 @ 1.20GHz $134.00*
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core BE-230 NA NA
Intel Core2 Duo T5750 @ 2.00GHz

109.57

$9.99*
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-64 $39.39*
Intel Pentium E2180 @ 2.00GHz

36.30

$29.99
AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile TL-62 $311.00*
AMD Athlon Dual Core 4050e NA NA
Celeron Dual-Core T3000 @ 1.80GHz NA NA
AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-72

4.84

$224.26*
AMD Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile ZM-82 NA NA
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core BE-2300 NA NA
AMD Sempron Dual Core 4900 NA NA
Intel Core i5-470UM @ 1. 33GHz NA NA
Intel Xeon 5110 @ 1.60GHz $159.95*
PassMark Software © 2008-2019

* — Last seen price from our affiliates.

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I’m a little confused by all this talk of Centrino, Centrino Duo, Core Duo and goodness knows what else. Please could you explain it all to me and rescue me from this tech quagmire!

Greg

Hi Greg,

It may seem difficult to comprehend but it really is quite simple. ‘Centrino’ is a marketing term for a type of laptop that promotes wireless network interoperability and long battery life, while ‘Core’ refers to the processor itself. To earn a Centrino badge, laptops must utilise a specific type of motherboard chipset, a specific type of wireless network card and a processor from the Intel Core range.

Three types of Core processor are commonly used in Centrino laptops: Core Solo, Core Duo and Core 2 Duo. Core Solo CPUs represent the bottom rung — they come in several guises but each variant is optimised for long battery life rather than raw speed. Laptops using Core Solo CPUs fall under the Centrino brand.

Centrino Duo-branded laptops use Core Duo processors. These are the dual-core alternatives to Core Solo. They typically have higher clock speeds, but more importantly, two cores (essentially twin brains) to share the workload.

Newer Centrino Duo laptops will utilise the Core 2 Duo series of processors. These chips have twice as much Level 2 cache memory for better performance, have optional high-speed 802. 11n Wi-Fi access, plus Intel 64 technology, which lets you take advantage of 64-bit operating systems.

You may also spot laptops branded Centrino Pro. These are reserved for business laptops that contain Intel vPro — a technology that allows IT managers to control, manage and protect laptops whether they’re on, off, broken or fully operational.

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Google Nest Hub Max: A higher-end smart display for Google Assistant joins the Nest family, adds a camera.

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Fire Strike and CompuBench OpenCL benchmarks

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PCMark 8 Home, PassMark, and Geekbench 3 benchmarks

Best Overall Performance

On CPU and iGPU benchmarks

Best Overall Performance: Laptops under 15W

On CPU and iGPU benchmarks

Best Value: Laptops under 15W

Performance per dollar

Best Overall Performance: Laptops over 15W

On CPU and iGPU benchmarks

Best Value: Laptops over 15W

Performance per dollar

CPU Reviews

Get all the details about the latest CPUs

IntelCore i3 3220

  • 3. 3 GHz
  • Dual core

AMDFX 8350

  • 4 GHz
  • Octa core
  • Unlocked

AMDFX 6300

  • 3.5 GHz
  • Hexa core
  • Unlocked

IntelCore i7 6700K

  • 4 GHz
  • Quad core
  • Unlocked

IntelCore i5 3470

  • 3.2 GHz
  • Quad core

IntelCore i5 6200U

  • 2.3 GHz
  • Dual core

IntelCore i7 4790K

  • 4 GHz
  • Quad core
  • Unlocked

IntelCore2 Duo E8400

  • 3 GHz
  • Dual core

IntelCore i5 4460

  • 3.2 GHz
  • Quad core

IntelCore i7 3770

  • 3.4 GHz
  • Quad core

IntelCore i5 5200U

  • 2. 2 GHz
  • Dual core

IntelCore i5 4200U

  • 1.6 GHz
  • Dual core

CPU Comparisons

Top contenders go at it head to head

Core 2 Duo vs Core i3: The Veteran vs. The Rookie

The Core 2 Duo has been the processor of choice in laptops for about three years. Over those three years the average speeds of Core 2 Duo processors have advanced significantly, and many of today’s Core 2 Duo laptops have speeds of around 2.2Ghz or faster. Core 2 Duo processors have also been the go-to for many less expensive desktop systems, with speeds reaching over 3Ghz.

However, there is a newcomer which is challenging the Core 2 Duo. This is the Core i3. It is very similar to the Core 2 Duo in many ways. Both are dual-core processors and most Core 2 Duos and Core i3 have similar clock speeds. However, the processors are based on different architectures.

So, which one is better?

Architecture

The Core 2 Duo processors are based off the Core 2 architecture. The Core and Core 2 architectures were arguably Intel’s most successful architectures, as they replaced the Pentium 4 processors in desktop systems and made Intel competitive in that space once again.

The Core i3 is based off a new architecture called Nehalem. The Nehalem architecture has numerous advantages over the Core 2 architecture. Nehalem is better constructed for quad-core processors, has hyper-threading available, and can use a feature called Turbo Boost which maximizes processor speed. However, because the Core i3 is the low-end Nehalem variant, most of these features are disabled or not relevant – the Core i3 is a dual core processor and Turbo Boost is disabled, but hyper-threading is enabled.

Intel Core 2 Duo Specifications

Processor Performance

The Core i3 is the slowest variant of the Nehalem based processor. The Core 2 Duo processors, however, don’t have the same differentiation between versions of the same architecture. The fastest Core 2 Duo desktop processor has a speed of 3. 33Ghz, while the fastest Core i3 desktop processor is clocked at 3.06Ghz.

Intel pentium hd graphics drivers. You might therefor expect that the Core 2 Duo would have the edge – particularly when you consider that the Core 2 Duo costs almost three times as much if you buy it individually – but in fact the Core i3 is faster, and often by no small margin. The Core i3 is faster even in single-threaded applications, but the performance gap really widens in multi-threaded applications. This is because the Core i3 has hyper-threading, which turns the two real cores into four virtual cores. Windows works with the Core i3 as if it is a quad-core processor.

These results remain true in the mobile space, as well. Core i3 processors punch at least 500Mhz above their weight in single-thread applications, and are virtually always faster in multi-threaded applications, no matter the clock speeds of the Core 2 Duo and Core i3 processors you are comparing.

Power Usage and Heat

A look at the technical specifications of the Core i3 processors automatically puts them into a negative light when it comes to power consumption. The desktop Core i3 parts at listed as having a 73 Watt TDP, while most Core 2 Duo desktop parts have a 65 Watt TDP. In laptops the Core i3 has a 35 watt TDP, while Core 2 Duo mobile processors usually have a 25 Watt TDP.

These differences pan out about how you’d expect them to when it comes to absolute power consumption. The Core i3 processors do consume just slightly more power than Core 2 Duo processors at load and at idle. We’re talking a difference of around 10 Watts on desktops and a few on laptops – nothing huge, but a difference none the less.

However, when it comes to power efficiency the answer becomes less clear. In order for a processor to be power efficient, it needs to not only have low power consumption but also the ability to complete tasks quickly. This lowers the overall ‘task energy’ because a faster processor will be done with a task before a slower processor, and once done it will slip back into an idle state.

When viewed from this perspective, the Core i3 is much more efficient than the Core 2 Duo on both the desktop and the laptop. This means that the Core i3 will probably not use any more power than a Core 2 Duo – and may actually use less – unless your usage patterns place a constant load on your processor.

Verdict

Overall, the answer is clear – the Core i3 is the better processor.

That doesn’t mean that it absolutely body-slams the Core 2 Duo. The Core 2 Duo isn’t hugely slower. However, the Core 2 Duo is on its way out, and the Core i3 is slightly better in just about every way.

In the desktop space, the ease with which you can find a Core i3 desktop means there is little reason to purchase a Core 2 Duo based system unless you’re on a very tight budget. On laptops, however, the story is a bit different. There are still some competent Core 2 Duo systems available, and they’re worth considering if their other advantages out-weight the slightly out of date processor.

This post is part of the series: Core i3, i5, and i7 Explained

It is often difficult to discern which new processors are the best. This guide to Intel’s new Core i3, i5, and i7 processors gives advice and information about them so that you can decide which processor is best for your needs.

Difference Between Dual Core and Core 2 Duo [Updated 2022]

Last Updated : Sep 20, 2022 / By Piyush Yadav
/ Fact Checked / 4 mins

Whenever we plan to buy a laptop or a personal computer, the first thing we think about is the processor. What does a processor do and why is a processor very important in a computer or a laptop is the question that arises first.

In the central processing unit, we have a brain and, in that brain, there are cores. One core can perform one task in a given time and when there are multiple cores then multiple tasks can take place at a time.

Several companies make processors and one among them is intel. Intel made several processors and two among them are dual-core and core 2 duo.

Dual Core vs Core 2 Duo

The main difference between dual-core and core 2 duo processors is that dual-core processors contain two cores and the core 2 duo processor is the second version of a dual-core processor.


 

Comparison Table Between Dual Core and Core 2 Duo (in Tabular Form)

Parameters of comparison Dual-core Core 2 Duo
Cpu speed 1200.05 MHz 797.78 MHz
Pipeline storage 20 14
Bus speed 200.0 MHz 133.0 MHz
Clock Speed 1.6 to 2 GHz 1.86 to 3.0 GHz
L2 Cache 1 MB 2MB to 4MB

 

What is Dual-core?

A silicon chip in the central processing unit has two cores and this is named as a Dual core. This is made to perform multiple tasking.

The Dual-core processor is manufactured by Intel as well as AMD. The performance of the previous versions of the processor is much less when compared to the dual-core processor.

In the previous versions, the power consumption is higher and the dual-core has very less power consumption. The next factor is the clock speed which is less in dual-core than in previous versions.

 

What is Core 2 Duo?

Core 2 duo is also a dual-core processor and the difference is the second batch of the dual-core processors is given this name. The core 2 duo processors are a little better as they are made in such a way that they can work on virtualization.

In this, the tasks that are given are executed separately as individual tasks because of the presence of two cores.  Most of the machines don’t take advantage of the dual processors.

These processors changed the system performance when compared to the previous model. These processors are being used in desktops and laptops in a wide range at a lower price.


Main Differences Between Dual Core and Core 2 Duo

  1. The dual-core processors the number of cycles that a CPU can execute a task in a second is low. Whereas in the core 2 duo processor the CPU speed is faster which makes the core 2 duo run faster.
  2. Whenever there are instructions given to the processors, the instructions get accumulated in a pipeline and this is called the pipeline storage. In the dual-core, the pipeline storage is more than in the core 2 duo processor.
  3. During the processing, data is transferred or moved across the bus. The speed at which the data moves in a bus is called bus speed and in dual-core it is more than compared to the core 2 duo.
  4. The lower the clock speed the higher will be the performance of the processors as well as the computer. The dual-core has lesser clock speed when compared to the core 2 duo.
  5. The memory that is built in a processor is generally termed as L2 cache and this cache size is less in the dual-core processor than in the core 2 duo processors. So this made core 2 better than the dual-core processor.
  6. With a little difference between these two processors, the whole operating system, the software that is running and also the tasks that are being executed were changed and this brought a lot of changes in the way of working and development. The subset of the dual-core processors namely core 2 duo processors are running with better clock speed and bus speeds.
  7. As the single processors can perform lesser than the dual processors these dual-core processors and core 2 duo processors can execute the tasks at a higher rate. Later on, different generations of processor’s development took place which increased the performance of multitasking even high.  

 

Conclusion

The processor manufacturing companies tried to improve their sales and their production by upgrading their processors. So, they developed dual-core processors that can execute multitasking.

So instead of increasing the vacuum tubes, the companies started increasing the cores in a single chip just to make sure the operating system increases its performance. The processors that have two cores are called dual-core and core 2 duo is also dual-core but the name is given as core 2 duo because they are made in the second line of manufacturing.

The previous versions of the processors took a long time to respond or work on multiple tasks and by the introduction of these dual-core processors, the whole multiple tasking phase changed. So when the dual-core is made the companies decided to differentiate their next upcoming versions so they named the second batch as core 2 duo processors.


References

  1. https://arxiv.org/abs/0709.1861

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Processor Intel Core2 Duo E8400

Home / Processors / Intel Core2 Duo E8400

  • Edelmark rating — 1.5 out of 10;
  • Release date: January, 2008;
  • Number of cores: 2;
  • Frequency: 3 GHz;
  • Power consumption (TDP): 65W;

Characteristics Intel Core2 Duo E8400

General parameters

Clock frequency 3GHz
Cores 2
Socket LGA 775

Functions

NX-bit (XD-bit) present Yes
Trusted computing support Yes
Virtualization support Yes
Instructions supported Supplemental SSE3
SSE2
SSE
MMX
SSE3
SSE4. 1
Support for dynamic frequency scaling (CPU Throttling) Yes

Integrated graphics

Graphics core No
Brand No
Latest DirectX No
Number of displays supported No
Graphics core clock speed No
Maximum clock frequency No
3DMark06 No

Parts and features

Architecture x86-64
threads 2
Second level cache (L2) 6MB
Second level cache per core (L2) 3 MB/core
Process 45 nm
Number of transistors 410,000,000
Maximum processors 1
Processor multiplier 9
Voltage range 0. 85 — 1.36V
Operating temperature Unknown — 72.4°C

Overclocking Core2 Duo E8400

Overclock review core 4.5
Acceleration clock 4.22 GHz
Water-cooled boost clock 4.23 GHz
Air cooled boost clock 4.22 GHz

Power consumption

Power consumption 65W
Annual cost of electricity (NON-commercial use) $15.66/year
Annual cost of electricity (commercial use) $56.94/year
Capacity per W 1.83pt/W
Average energy consumption 52.81W

Bus

Architecture FSB
Clock frequency 1. 333MHz

Comparison of Core2 Duo E8400 with similar processors

Performance

Performance using all cores.

Tested on: PCMark 8 Home 3.0 Accelerated, PassMark, Geekbench 3 Multi-Core.

Core2 Duo E8400 5.1 out of 10
Core i3 3220 6.1 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 4.9 out of 10

Performance per core

Base performance per processor core.

Tested on: PassMark (Single Core), Geekbench 3 Single Core, Geekbench 3 AES Single Core.

Core2 Duo E8400 4.7 out of 10
Core i3 3220 6.5 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 4.5 out of 10

Integrated Graphics

Integrated GPU performance for graphics tasks.

Core2 Duo E8400 0.0 out of 10
Core i3 3220 4. 6 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 0.0 out of 10

Integrated Graphics (OpenCL)

Embedded GPU performance for parallel computing.

Tested on: CompuBench 1.5 Bitcoin mining, CompuBench 1.5 Face detection, CompuBench 1.5 Ocean Surface Simulation, CompuBench 1.5 T-Rex, CompuBench 1.5 Video composition.

Core2 Duo E8400 0.0 out of 10
Core i3 3220 4.6 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 0.0 out of 10

Performance per Watt

How efficiently the processor uses electricity.

Tested with: Fire Strike, CompuBench 1.5 Bitcoin mining, CompuBench 1.5 Face detection, CompuBench 1.5 Ocean Surface Simulation, CompuBench 1.5 T-Rex, CompuBench 1.5 Video composition, PCMark 8 Home 3.0 Accelerated, PassMark, Geekbench 3 Multi-Core , PassMark (Single Core), Geekbench 3 Single Core, Geekbench 3 AES Single Core, TDP.

Core2 Duo E8400 2.3 out of 10
Core i3 3220 6.4 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 2.3 out of 10

Price-performance ratio

How much you overpay for performance.

Tested on: Fire Strike, CompuBench 1.5 Bitcoin mining, CompuBench 1.5 Face detection, CompuBench 1.5 Ocean Surface Simulation, CompuBench 1.5 T-Rex, CompuBench 1.5 Video composition, PCMark 8 Home 3.0 Accelerated, PassMark, Geekbench 3 Multi-Core, PassMark (Single Core), Geekbench 3 Single Core, Geekbench 3 AES Single Core, Price.

Core2 Duo E8400 no data
Core i3 3220 6.6 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 no data

Total Edelmark rating

Total processor rating.

Core2 Duo E8400 1.5 out of 10
Core i3 3220 6. 1 out of 10
Core2 Duo E7500 1.4 out of 10

Benchmarks Core2 Duo E8400

CompuBench 1.5 (Bitcoin mining)

Core2 Duo E8400 2.41 mHash/s
Core i3 3220 4.07 mHash/s
Core2 Duo E7500 no data

GeekBench 3 (Multi-core)

Core2 Duo E8400 2.982
Core i3 3220 5.399
Core2 Duo E7500 2.850

GeekBench 3 (Single Core)

Core2 Duo E8400 1.625
Core i3 3220 2.501
Core2 Duo E7500 1.553

GeekBench 3 (AES single core)

Core2 Duo E8400 128,000 MB/s
Core i3 3220 173,000 MB/s
Core2 Duo E7500 124,700 MB/s

GeekBench (32-bit)

Core2 Duo E8400 2. 826
Core i3 3220 5.351
Core2 Duo E7500 2.673

GeekBench (64-bit)

Core2 Duo E8400 3.092
Core i3 3220 5.707
Core2 Duo E7500 2.986

PassMark

Core2 Duo E8400 2.160
Core i3 3220 4.229
Core2 Duo E7500 1.877

PassMark (Single Core)

Core2 Duo E8400 1.251
Core i3 3220 1.764
Core2 Duo E7500 1.204

Video reviews

Test Core 2 Duo E8400 + 4GB RAM in 2017. You can also play!

Core 2 Duo E8400 + GT 1030 PUBG, CS GO, GTA 5, Dota 2