Intel hd graphics 5000 performance: Intel HD 5000 (Mobile 1.0/1.1 GHz)

HD Graphics 5000 [in 9 benchmarks]

Summary

Intel started HD Graphics 5000 sales 5 June 2013. This is a Gen. 7.5 Haswell architecture notebook card based on 22 nm manufacturing process and primarily aimed at office use.

Compatibility-wise, this is card attached via PCIe 1.0 x16 interface. Power consumption is at 30 Watt.

It provides poor gaming and benchmark performance at


1.39%

of a leader’s which is NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4090.

GeForce RTX4090

Compare

General info


Some basic facts about HD Graphics 5000: architecture, market segment, release date etc.

Place in performance ranking 912
Value for money 0.04
Architecture Gen. 7.5 Haswell (2012−2013)
GPU code name Haswell GT3
Market segment Laptop
Release date 5 June 2013 (10 years old)
Current price $489 of 168889 (A100 PCIe 80 GB)

Value for money

Performance to price ratio. The higher, the better.

Technical specs


HD Graphics 5000’s specs such as number of shaders, GPU base clock, manufacturing process, texturing and calculation speed. These parameters indirectly speak of HD Graphics 5000’s performance, but for precise assessment you have to consider its benchmark and gaming test results.

Pipelines / CUDA cores 40 of 20480 (Data Center GPU Max NEXT)
Core clock speed 200 MHz of 2610 (Radeon RX 6500 XT)
Boost clock speed 1100 MHz of 3599 (Radeon RX 7990 XTX)
Number of transistors 1,300 million of 14400 (GeForce GTX 1080 SLI Mobile)
Manufacturing process technology 22 nm of 4 (GeForce RTX 4080)
Power consumption (TDP) 30 Watt of 2400 (Data Center GPU Max Subsystem)
Texture fill rate 44. 00 of 969.9 (h200 SXM5 96 GB)

Size and compatibility


Information on HD Graphics 5000’s compatibility with other computer components. Useful when choosing a future computer configuration or upgrading an existing one. For notebook video cards it’s notebook size, connection slot and bus, if the video card is inserted into a slot instead of being soldered to the notebook motherboard.

Interface PCIe 1.0 x16

Memory


Parameters of memory installed on HD Graphics 5000: its type, size, bus, clock and resulting bandwidth. Note that GPUs integrated into processors have no dedicated memory and use a shared part of system RAM instead.

Memory type System Shared
Maximum RAM amount System Shared of 128 (Radeon Instinct MI250X)
Memory bus width 64/128 Bit of 8192 (Radeon Instinct MI250X)
Memory clock speed System Shared of 22400 (GeForce RTX 4080)
Shared memory +

Video outputs and ports


Types and number of video connectors present on HD Graphics 5000. As a rule, this section is relevant only for desktop reference graphics cards, since for notebook ones the availability of certain video outputs depends on the laptop model, while non-reference desktop models can (though not necessarily will) bear a different set of video ports.

Display Connectors No outputs

Technologies


Technological solutions and APIs supported by HD Graphics 5000. You’ll probably need this information if you need some particular technology for your purposes.

Quick Sync +

API support


APIs supported by HD Graphics 5000, sometimes including their particular versions.

DirectX 12 (11_1)
Shader Model 5.1
OpenGL 4.3 of 4.6 (GeForce GTX 1080 Mobile)
OpenCL 1. 2
Vulkan 1.1.80

Benchmark performance


Synthetic benchmark performance of HD Graphics 5000. The combined score is measured on a 0-100 point scale.


Combined synthetic benchmark score

This is our combined benchmark performance score. We are regularly improving our combining algorithms, but if you find some perceived inconsistencies, feel free to speak up in comments section, we usually fix problems quickly.


HD Graphics 5000
1.39

    Passmark

    This is probably the most ubiquitous benchmark, part of Passmark PerformanceTest suite. It gives the graphics card a thorough evaluation under various load, providing four separate benchmarks for Direct3D versions 9, 10, 11 and 12 (the last being done in 4K resolution if possible), and few more tests engaging DirectCompute capabilities.

    Benchmark coverage: 25%


    HD Graphics 5000
    574

    3DMark Vantage Performance

    3DMark Vantage is an outdated DirectX 10 benchmark using 1280×1024 screen resolution. It taxes the graphics card with two scenes, one depicting a girl escaping some militarized base located within a sea cave, the other displaying a space fleet attack on a defenseless planet. It was discontinued in April 2017, and Time Spy benchmark is now recommended to be used instead.

    Benchmark coverage: 16%


    HD Graphics 5000
    4277

    3DMark 11 Performance GPU

    3DMark 11 is an obsolete DirectX 11 benchmark by Futuremark. It used four tests based on two scenes, one being few submarines exploring the submerged wreck of a sunken ship, the other is an abandoned temple deep in the jungle. All the tests are heavy with volumetric lighting and tessellation, and despite being done in 1280×720 resolution, are relatively taxing. Discontinued in January 2020, 3DMark 11 is now superseded by Time Spy.

    Benchmark coverage: 16%


    HD Graphics 5000
    1034

    3DMark Fire Strike Score

    Benchmark coverage: 13%


    HD Graphics 5000
    651

    3DMark Fire Strike Graphics

    Fire Strike is a DirectX 11 benchmark for gaming PCs. It features two separate tests displaying a fight between a humanoid and a fiery creature seemingly made of lava. Using 1920×1080 resolution, Fire Strike shows off some realistic graphics and is quite taxing on hardware.

    Benchmark coverage: 13%


    HD Graphics 5000
    716

    3DMark Cloud Gate GPU

    Cloud Gate is an outdated DirectX 11 feature level 10 benchmark that was used for home PCs and basic notebooks. It displays a few scenes of some weird space teleportation device launching spaceships into unknown, using fixed resolution of 1280×720. Just like Ice Storm benchmark, it has been discontinued in January 2020 and replaced by 3DMark Night Raid.

    Benchmark coverage: 13%


    HD Graphics 5000
    5694

    3DMark Ice Storm GPU

    Ice Storm Graphics is an obsolete benchmark, part of 3DMark suite. Ice Storm was used to measure entry level laptops and Windows-based tablets performance. It utilizes DirectX 11 feature level 9 to display a battle between two space fleets near a frozen planet in 1280×720 resolution. Discontinued in January 2020, it is now superseded by 3DMark Night Raid.

    Benchmark coverage: 8%


    HD Graphics 5000
    65904

    Unigine Heaven 3.0

    This is an old DirectX 11 benchmark using Unigine, a 3D game engine by eponymous Russian company. It displays a fantasy medieval town sprawling over several flying islands. Version 3.0 was released in 2012, and in 2013 it was superseded by Heaven 4. 0, which introduced several slight improvements, including a newer version of Unigine.

    Benchmark coverage: 4%


    HD Graphics 5000
    12

    GeekBench 5 Metal

    Geekbench 5 is a widespread graphics card benchmark combined from 11 different test scenarios. All these scenarios rely on direct usage of GPU’s processing power, no 3D rendering is involved. This variation uses Metal API by Apple.

    Benchmark coverage: 0%


    HD Graphics 5000
    1376


    Gaming performance


    Let’s see how good HD Graphics 5000 is for gaming. Particular gaming benchmark results are measured in frames per second. Comparisons with game system requirements are included, but remember that sometimes official requirements may reflect reality inaccurately.

    Average FPS across all PC games

    Here are the average frames per second in a large set of popular modern games across different resolutions:

    Full HD 11

    Performance in popular games

    Relative perfomance


    Overall HD Graphics 5000 performance compared to nearest competitors among notebook video cards.



    AMD Radeon HD 6755G2
    102.16


    AMD Radeon R5 M335
    100.72


    NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M
    100


    Intel HD Graphics 5000
    100


    ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5830
    99.28


    AMD Radeon HD 6570M
    99.28


    AMD Radeon R7 M265
    98.56

    Similar GPUs

    Here is our recommendation of several graphics cards that are more or less close in performance to the one reviewed.

    GeForce GT630M

    Compare



    Radeon R5
    M335




    Radeon HD
    6570M




    Radeon R7
    M265




    Radeon HD
    6755G2


    Radeon HD8650G

    Compare

    Recommended processors

    These processors are most commonly used with HD Graphics 5000 according to our statistics.



    Core i5
    4260U

    10.4%



    Core i5
    4250U

    8%



    Core i3
    5005U

    7.3%



    Core i5
    5200U

    4.5%



    Core i7
    4650U

    3.8%



    Core i5
    1135G7

    2.6%



    Core i3
    1005G1

    2.1%



    Core i5
    5300U

    2%



    Core i3
    370M

    2%



    Core i5
    1035G1

    1. 9%

    User ratings: view and submit


    Here you can see the user rating of the graphics card, as well as rate it yourself.


    Questions and comments


    Here you can ask a question about HD Graphics 5000, agree or disagree with our judgements, or report an error or mismatch.


    Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

    A Look at Intel HD 5000 GPU Performance Compared to HD 4000

    by Anand Lal Shimpion June 24, 2013 6:02 PM EST

    • Posted in
    • GPUs
    • CPUs
    • Intel
    • Haswell

    55 Comments
    |

    55 Comments


    When I got my hands on a Haswell based Ultrabook, Acer’s recently announced S7, I was somewhat disappointed to learn that Acer had chosen to integrate Intel’s HD 4400 (Haswell GT2) instead of the full blown HD 5000 (Haswell GT3) option. I published some performance data comparing HD 4400 to the previous generation HD 4000 (Ivy Bridge GT2) but added that at some point I’d like to take a look at HD 5000 to see how much more performance that gets you. It turns out that all of Apple’s 2013 MacBook Air lineup features Haswell GT3 (via the standard Core i5-4250U or the optional Core i7-4650U). Earlier today I published our review of the 2013 MBA, but for those not interested in the MBA but curious about how Haswell GT3 stacks up in a very thermally limited configuration I thought I’d do a separate post breaking out the findings.


    In mobile, Haswell is presently available in five different graphics configurations:









    Intel 4th Generation Core (Haswell) Mobile GPU Configurations

     

    Intel Iris Pro 5200

    Intel Iris 5100

    Intel HD 5000

    Intel HD 4400

    Intel HD 4200

    Codename

    GT3e

    GT3

    GT3

    GT2

    GT2

    EUs

    40

    40

    40

    20

    20

    Max Frequency

    1. 3GHz

    1.2GHz

    1.1GHz

    1.1GHz

    850MHz

    eDRAM

    128MB





    TDP

    47W/55W

    28W

    15W

    15W

    15W


    The top three configurations use a GPU with 40 EUs, while the HD 4400/4200 features half that. Intel will eventually introduce Haswell SKUs with vanilla Intel HD Graphics, which will only feature 10 EUs. We know how the Iris Pro 5200 performs, but that’s with a bunch of eDRAM and a very high TDP. Iris 5100 is likely going to be used in Apple’s 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display as well as ASUS’ Zenbook Infinity, neither of which are out yet. The third GT3 configuration operates under less than a third of the TDP of Iris Pro 5200. With such low thermal limits, just how fast can this GPU actually be?


    First, let’s look at what Intel told us earlier this year:


    Compared to Intel’s HD 4000 (Ivy Bridge/dark blue bar), Intel claimed roughly a 25% increase in performance with HD 5000 in 3DMark06 and a 50% increase in performance in 3DMark11. We now have the systems to validate Intel’s claims, so how did they do?


    In 3DMark 11 we’re showing a 64% increase in performance if we compare Intel’s HD 5000 (15W) to Intel’s HD 4000 (17W). The 3DMark06 comparison yields a 21% increase in performance compared to Ivy Bridge ULV. In both cases we’ve basically validated Intel’s claims. But neither of these benchmarks tell us much about actual 3D gaming performance. In our 2013 MBA review we ran a total of eight 3D games. I’ve summarized the performance advantages in the table below:





    Intel HD 5000 (Haswell ULT GT3) vs. Intel HD 4000 (Ivy Bridge ULV GT2)

     

    GRID 2

    Super Street Fighter IV: AE

    Minecraft

    Borderlands 2

    Tomb Raider (2013)

    Sleeping Dogs

    Metro: LL

    BioShock 2

    HD 5000 Advantage

    16. 2%

    12.4%

    16.9%

    3.0%

    40.8%

    6.5%

    2.3%

    24.4%


    The data ranges from a meager 2.3% advantage over Ivy Bridge ULV to as much as 40.8%. On average, Intel’s HD 5000 offered a 15.3% performance advantage over Intel’s HD 4000 graphics. Whether or not that’s impressive really depends on your perspective. Given the sheer increase in transistor count, a 15% gain on average seems a bit underwhelming. To understand why, you have to keep in mind that the performance gains come on the same 22nm node, with a lower overall TDP. Haswell ULT GT3 has to be faster, with less thermal headroom than Ivy Bridge ULV GT2.


    The range of performance improvement really depends on turbo residency. With only a 15W TDP (inclusive of the CPU and PCH), games that have more CPU activity or the right combination of GPU activity will see lower GPU clocks. In Borderlands 2 for example, I confirmed that the GT3 GPU alone was using up all of the package TDP thus forcing lower clocks:


    All of this just brings us to the conclusion that increasing processor graphics performance in thermally limited conditions is very tough, particularly without a process shrink. The fact that Intel even spent as many transistors as it did just to improve GPU performance tells us a lot about Intel’s thinking these days. Given how thermally limited Haswell GT3 is at 15W, it seems like Broadwell can’t come soon enough for another set of big gains in GPU performance.


    I also put together a little graph showing the progression of low TDP Intel GPU performance since Sandy Bridge. I used GRID 2 as it seemed to scale the most reasonably across all GPUs:


    Note how the single largest gain happens with the move from 32nm to 22nm (there was also a big architectural improvement with HD 4000 so it’s not all process). There’s definite tapering that happens as the last three GPUs are on 22nm. The move to 14nm should help the performance curve keep its enthusiasm.


    If you want more details and Intel HD 5000 numbers feel free to check out the GPU sections of our 2013 MacBook Air review.

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    HD Graphics 5000 [in 9 benchmarks]

    Description

    Intel started HD Graphics 5000 sales on June 5, 2013. This is Gen. 7.5 Haswell and 22 nm manufacturing process, primarily designed for office use.

    In terms of compatibility, this is a PCIe 1.0 x16 card. Power consumption — 30 W.

    It provides poor performance in tests and games at the level of

    1.39%

    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4090 003

    Information about the type (desktop or laptop) and architecture of the HD Graphics 5000, as well as when sales started and cost at the time.

    9 0045

    Performance ranking 912
    Value for money 5

    Architecture Gen. 7.5 Haswell (2012-2013)
    GPU Haswell GT3
    Type Notebook
    Release date June 5, 2013 (10 years ago)
    Price now 489$ of 168889 (A100 PCIe 80 GB)

    Value for money

    Performance to price ratio. The higher the better.

    Features

    HD Graphics 5000’s general performance parameters such as number of shaders, GPU core clock, manufacturing process, texturing and calculation speed. They indirectly speak of HD Graphics 5000’s performance, but for precise assessment you have to consider its benchmark and gaming test results.

    900 36 Core clock

    9003 6 of 4 (GeForce RTX 4080)

    Number of stream processors 40 of 20480 (Data Center GPU Max NEXT)
    200 MHz of 2610 (Radeon RX 6500 XT)
    Boost clock 1100 MHz of 3599 (Radeon RX 7990 XTX)
    Number of transistors 1.300 million of 14400 (GeForce GTX 1080 SLI Mobile))
    Process 22nm
    TDP 30 W of 2400 (Data Center GPU Max Subsystem)
    Texturing speed 44.00 9002 2 of 969.9 (h200 SXM5 96 GB)

    Compatibility and dimensions

    Information on HD Graphics 5000 compatibility with other computer components. Useful for example when choosing the configuration of a future computer or to upgrade an existing one. For laptop video cards, this is the estimated size of the laptop, the bus and the connection connector, if the video card is connected through the connector, and not soldered on the motherboard.

    Interface PCIe 1.0 x16

    RAM

    Parameters of the memory installed on HD Graphics 5000 — type, size, bus, frequency and bandwidth. For video cards built into the processor that do not have their own memory, a shared part of the RAM is used.

    900 36

    Memory type System memory used
    Maximum memory System used of 128 (Radeon Instinct MI250X)
    Memory bus width 64/128 bit of 8192 (Radeon Instinct MI250X)
    Memory clock Used system of 22400 (GeForce RTX 4080)
    Shared memory +

    Video outputs

    Types and number of video connectors present on HD Graphics 5000. As a rule, this section is relevant only for desktop reference video cards, since for laptop ones the availability of certain video outputs depends on the laptop model.

    Video sockets No outputs 0004
    The technologies and APIs supported by HD Graphics 5000 are listed here. You will need this information if your video card is required to support specific technologies.

    Quick Sync +

    API support

    APIs supported by HD Graphics 5000, including their versions.

    900 36 5.1

    DirectX 12 (11_1)
    Shader model
    OpenGL 4.3 of 4.6 (GeForce GTX 1080 (mobile))
    OpenCL 1.2
    Vulkan 1. 1.80

    These are the results of HD Graphics 5000 rendering performance tests in non-gaming benchmarks. The overall score is set from 0 to 100, where 100 corresponds to the fastest video card at the moment.


    Overall benchmark performance

    This is our overall performance rating. We regularly improve our algorithms, but if you find any inconsistencies, feel free to speak up in the comments section, we usually fix problems quickly.

    HD Graphics 5000
    1.39

      Passmark

      This is a very common benchmark included in the Passmark PerformanceTest package. He gives the graphics card a thorough evaluation by running four separate tests for Direct3D versions 9, 10, 11 and 12 (the latter is done in 4K resolution if possible), and a few more tests using DirectCompute.

      Benchmark coverage: 25%

      HD Graphics 5000
      574

      3DMark Vantage Performance

      3DMark Vantage is an outdated DirectX 10 benchmark. It loads the graphics card with two scenes, one of which shows a girl running away from some kind of military base located in a sea cave, and the other of a space fleet attacking defenseless planet. Support for 3DMark Vantage was discontinued in April 2017 and it is now recommended to use the Time Spy benchmark instead.

      Benchmark coverage: 16%

      HD Graphics 5000
      4277

      3DMark 11 Performance GPU

      3DMark 11 is Futuremark’s legacy DirectX 11 benchmark. He used four tests based on two scenes: one is several submarines exploring a sunken ship, the other is an abandoned temple deep in the jungle. All tests make extensive use of volumetric lighting and tessellation and, despite being run at 1280×720, are relatively heavy. Support for 3DMark 11 ended in January 2020 and is now being replaced by Time Spy.

      Benchmark coverage: 16%

      HD Graphics 5000
      1034

      3DMark Fire Strike Score

      Benchmark coverage: 13%

      HD Graphics 5000
      651

      3DMark Fire Strike Graphics

      Fire Strike is a DirectX 11 benchmark for gaming PCs. It features two separate tests showing a fight between a humanoid and a fiery creature that appears to be made of lava. Using resolution 1920×1080, Fire Strike shows quite realistic graphics and is quite demanding on hardware.

      Benchmark coverage: 13%

      HD Graphics 5000
      716

      3DMark Cloud Gate GPU

      Cloud Gate is a legacy DirectX 11 feature level 10 benchmark used to test home PCs and low-end laptops. It displays several scenes of some strange teleportation device launching spaceships into the unknown at a fixed resolution of 1280×720. As with the Ice Storm benchmark, it was deprecated in January 2020 and 3DMark Night Raid is now recommended instead.

      Benchmark coverage: 13%

      HD Graphics 5000
      5694

      3DMark Ice Storm GPU

      Ice Storm Graphics is an obsolete benchmark, part of the 3DMark package. Ice Storm has been used to measure the performance of entry-level laptops and Windows-based tablets. It uses DirectX 11 feature level 9 to render a battle between two space fleets near a frozen planet at 1280×720 resolution. Support for Ice Storm ended in January 2020, now the developers recommend using Night Raid instead.

      Benchmark coverage: 8%

      HD Graphics 5000
      65904

      Unigine Heaven 3.0

      This is an old DirectX 11 based benchmark using the Unigine 3D game engine from the Russian company of the same name. It depicts a medieval fantasy city spread over several floating islands. Version 3.0 was released in 2012 and was replaced by Heaven 4.0 in 2013, which introduced several minor improvements, including a newer version of the Unigine engine.

      Benchmark coverage: 4%

      HD Graphics 5000
      12

      GeekBench 5 Metal

      Geekbench 5 is a widely used benchmark for graphics cards that combines 11 different test scenarios. All of these scenarios are based on the direct use of the processing power of the GPU, without the use of 3D rendering. This variant uses Apple’s Metal API.

      Benchmark coverage: 0%

      HD Graphics 5000
      1376


      HD Graphics 5000 in games

      FPS in popular games on HD Graphics 5000, as well as compliance with system requirements. Remember that the official requirements of the developers do not always match the data of real tests.

      Average FPS

      Here are the average fps for a large selection of popular games at various resolutions:

      Full HD 11

      Popular games

      Relative performance

      900 04
      Overall HD Graphics 5000 performance compared to its nearest competitor notebook graphics cards.


      AMD Radeon HD 6755G2
      101.44

      AMD Radeon R5 M335
      100.72

      NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M
      100

      Intel HD Graphics 5000
      100

      ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5830
      99. 28

      AMD Radeon HD 6570M
      99.28

      AMD Radeon R7 M265
      98.56

      Other video cards

      Here we recommend several video cards that are more or less similar in performance to the reviewed one.

      GeForce GT 630M

      Compare


      Radeon R5
      M335


      Radeon HD
      6570M

      Radeon HD 6755G2

      Compare

      Radeon R7 M265

      equal


      Radeon HD
      8650G

      Recommended processors

      According to our statistics, these processors are most often used with HD Graphics 5000.


      Core i5
      4260U

      10.4%


      Core i5
      4250U

      8%


      Core i3
      5005U

      7.3%


      Core i5
      5200U

      4.

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