Pentium d problems: Intel Pentium D 805 — Dual Core on a Budget

Solved: Pentium D 820 with Intel D101GGC boot problem

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I’m having some trouble with my current system not booting. I’ve already commented on another post on this forum for a similiar problem, and on another forum as well (see this post).

If this cpu is in my mobo, I can’t boot the system immediately. Once it runs, it’s fine, but getting it started is the problem. When I insert my old Celeron D it works perfectly. Also, the CPU has been tested and it appears to be fine. Look at my other post to see the specifics, or ask me and I’ll post it here.

Does anyone have any ideas? Also, the last suggestion was to change my CPU voltage in case it might be undervolting, but my bios doesn’t support voltage changes. Any suggestions?

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Hey,

It may be an idea to go into your BIOS upon the cold boot and choose «Load optimised defaults», save and then exit the BIOS. Give this a try and then shut down the system again and try cold boot, see if it works this time, if not post back.

Regards.
Nick.

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What is the model of the Celeron that works correctly?

Access your BIOS and post your BIOS string. It should be GC11010N.86A.xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.xxxx (with the x’s being a series of numbers).

I assume that the machine was originally configured with the Celeron processor, is this correct?

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intel site says bios version 304 or greater required for 820….One of my sons has this board with an 820 in it …He has no problems…..But he is using the onboard video…I know that the board requires a 24 pin power supply when using pciexpress video card….It will run with a 20 pin powersupply but only with the onboard video…The board receives limited support from intel due to the fact it was manufactured just after ati was bought by amd

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It may be an idea to go into your BIOS upon the cold boot and choose «Load optimised defaults», save and then exit the BIOS. Give this a try and then shut down the system again and try cold boot, see if it works this time, if not post back.

Click to expand…

I tried a CMOS reset and then a Load Optimised Defaults, but it did not have any effect; it still has trouble booting.

What is the model of the Celeron that works correctly?

Access your BIOS and post your BIOS string. It should be GC11010N.86A.xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.xxxx (with the x’s being a series of numbers).

I assume that the machine was originally configured with the Celeron processor, is this correct?

Click to expand…

The Celeron is a Celeron D 330. The BIOS string is GC11010N.86A.0311.2006.0420.1525. I don’t believe the system was configured for the Celeron, since the mobo was bought off-the-shelf. I replaced the original systems motherboard with the D101GGC since the original one did not have PCI-E. So unless it came configured from Intel, I don’t think it was.

intel site says bios version 304 or greater required for 820….One of my sons has this board with an 820 in it …He has no problems…..But he is using the onboard video…I know that the board requires a 24 pin power supply when using pciexpress video card….It will run with a 20 pin powersupply but only with the onboard video. ..The board receives limited support from intel due to the fact it was manufactured just after ati was bought by amd

Click to expand…

I am using a 24 pin PSU, but I’m not using onboard video. I got the GPU and CPU at the same time, and the two worked fine for a while (a month or so, if I remember correctly). Also, removing the GPU and using the onboard does not solve the problem.

You guys think I should just get a new mobo? I starting to feel that this mobo just isn’t worth the trouble it’s giving me… I know it’s not a great one, but I got a great deal on it. And I’m a student, so funds are limited.

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does anything come up on the screen?
e.g 73h

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mclarenvj said:

does anything come up on the screen?
e.g 73h

Click to expand…

The system switches of before my screen comes on, so if there is a message, I don’t see it.

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then is your bios up to date.
to update it load winxp with your other CPU that works, and download the latest from intels website

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and on the intel website it says that it supports celreron D and Pentium 4, so im guessing you will have to update your bios http://www.intel.com/design/motherbd/gc/gc_available.htm

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mclarenvj said:

and on the intel website it says that it supports celreron D and Pentium 4, so im guessing you will have to update your bios http://www.intel.com/design/motherbd/gc/gc_available.htm

Click to expand…

This page shows that the Pentium D is supported on the mobo and this page shows that the 820 is supported with BIOS version 304 or greater. The link you gave refers to the D101GGCL.

I currently have BIOS version 311 installed, but If there is a newer one I’ll give it a try.

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Since you bought the machine off the shelf and replaced the motherboard what is the make and exact model of the machine? What was the make and model of the board you replaced with the D101GGC?

I suspect that you did not reload windows after the motherboard change, is this correct? If you used the original hard drive without reinstalling windows, then the motherboard drivers for the old board are being used by the new board. If you did reinstall windows from a system builder disk such as the ones provided by eMachines, HP and others that use an «image» for recovery, then the «image» is installing the motherboard drivers for the old board.

If the above scenario is correct, for the machine to operate properly, you MAY have to purchase a new copy of windows, reload windows and then load the motherboard drivers from the disk that came with the D101GGC board.

Please advise exactly what you did when you replaced the board.

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Here is the full history:

3rd Quarter of 2005, I bought a Fujitsu-Siemens Scaleo L Special Edition (as far as I know this specific model was only available in South Africa). This system had the Celeron D and a Value Mainboard D2190 (think that’s the right link). It came with Windows XP Home OEM, 512meg DDR400 RAM and a 160gig HDD.

Around end of March 2006 I decided to replace the motherboard with the D101GGC. I also purchased a copy of Windows XP Pro, and two extra 20gig hard drives. I redid the whole system, installing Windows on the one 20gig drive, Mandrake Linux on the other 20gig and formatted the 160gig and put it in a external case for my data. I did install the D101GGC mobo drivers when I installed XP Pro.

At the start of this year I decided to upgrade the CPU and add a GPU. Since my mobo did not support anything higher than the Pentium D 820 I decided on that. I also added an extra 512 RAM and the GeForce 7600GS. I used this system for I think almost a month before it started giving trouble. I thought it might be the PSU, so I replaced that. Still gave the problem, so I sent the CPU back to be checked and also gave them the mobo since I still had about a week or so left on the warranty (the CPU and mobo were purchased from the same distributor, Rectron, but obviously about a year apart). They told me the mobo was faulty and replaced it. They also said the CPU was fine. The new mobo did not solve the problem.

Since then I have had the HDD, RAM, GPU, PSU, all my PCI addon cards (56k modem, wireless lan card) and the DVD drive tested seperately (I have 2 other PC’s I use for testing components and software), and they all seem to be fine. The problem only presents itselfs if the Pentium D is in the D101GGC. I don’t have an extra LGA775 mobo, so I can’t test the CPU myself, but it was tested and came back with an OK.

I installed the new BIOS just before reading this post. I’ll have to see if it works now. If the system has booted once, I can switch it off and soon turn it on again without trouble; soon meaning 2 or 3 minutes maybe. However, if I switch it off and leave it off for a while, say more than 5 minutes, I can’t switch it on again.

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Your BIOS string indicates that BIOS version 311 is installed. At the Intel site no version 311 is listed. The BIOS versions jump from 307 to 312 then to 313.

What I suspect is there MAY have been a version 311 that was problematic that Intel has removed. What I would do is flash the BIOS with the latest version, eg. 313 and see if that solves your problem.

Here is a link to BIOS version 313;

http://downloadcenter. intel.com/Fil…ctID=2229&OSFullname=OS+Independent&strOSs=38

Here are the instructions for flashing the BIOS;

http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det…ID=2229&DwnldID=11738&strOSs=38&OSFullName=OS Independent&lang=eng

BE SURE AND FOLLOW THE FLASHING INSTRUCTIONS EXACTLY AS WRITTEN.

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win2kpro said:

What I would do is flash the BIOS with the latest version, eg. 313 and see if that solves your problem.

Click to expand…

Thanks, but I already mentioned I installed the new BIOS in my previous reply.

DuhbLinn said:

I installed the new BIOS just before reading this post. I’ll have to see if it works now.

Click to expand…

I now have GC11010N.86A.0313.2006.0915.1840, but I won’t know if it works before I keep my system switched off for a while. And since I’m using my computer now, this won’t happen for some time.

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PC still won’t boot. Thanks for all the help guys, but I think I’m just gonna replace the mobo with something better. I’m getting really tired of having to deal with this. Think it’s time to throw in the towel.

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Working with machines every day I realize just how «trying» they can be at times. The problem may well be the mainboard, however before you «throw the towel in» let’s have a look at a couple of things.

First, please post the exact make and model of your power supply and a link if possible.

Second, if you can access BIOS post the temperatures and voltages displayed in BIOS.

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I don’t have a link for the PSU, but it’s an AOpen 400W. The model no. on the PSU is Z400-08F.

The CPU temp is 63 degrees Celsius. It used to be slightly lower, but I only had a little thermal paste left when I inserted it the last time, so I assumed the rise in temp is because of that.

The voltages reported by the BIOS are as follows:
V12. 0: 11.78V
V5.0: 5.07V
V3.3: 3.28V
Vccp: 1.32V

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The voltages look fine, however the CPU temp is too high. The 820 uses the Smithfield core which is Prescott based. The thermal specifications for that processor is 64.1°C.

Before I gave up, I would get some Thermal Compound or a Thermal Pad, thoroughly clean the processor Integrated Heat Spreader and bottom of the heatsink with some high purity isopropyl alcohol or denatured alcohol, dry the cleaned areas completely, apply the thermal compound or thermal pad and re-seat the cooler to the processor heat spreader.

BE SURE TO UNPLUG THE MACHINE BEFORE PERFORMING ANY OF THE ABOVE PROCEDURE

If you are using the standard Intel socket 775 cooler follow these instructions.

Turn the locking pins clockwise with your fingers as far as they will go. Align the locking pins with the holes in the motherboard making sure your fan connector wire is clear of the cooler and is as close as possible to the motherboard CPU fan header. When all the locking pins are properly aligned, push down HARD on 2 pins at a time diagonal from each other. After all the pins are down and locked, push down HARD again on all 4 pins. Re-connect the CPU fan and check for operation.

It is extremely important that the heatsink be in contact with the processor heat spreader under pressure. If the heatsink is not in contact with the heat spreader under pressure, the machine will either fail to boot or will run for a few seconds and shut down.

An 820 processor properly installed in a case with good thermal design should operate in the mid to upper 40’s at idle.

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Thanks, I’ll give it a try.

I also just noticed something. If I check the CPU temp in the BIOS, I get a value of around 60. There is only the one temp displayed. If I use an app, like CPUID PC Wizard 2006, I get the following info:

Processor Temperature: 45
Mainboard Temperature: 46
Power/Aux Temperature: 55
GPU Temperature: 47

Which value is more accurate? The BIOS or the app?

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In my opinion BIOS is more accurate.

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