Samsung 840 pro vs 860 evo: Samsung 840 Pro vs 860 Evo

Samsung 850 Pro / 850 EVO versus 840 EVO and 840 SSD Series

Samsung 850 Pro SSD is currently the latest flagship of Samsung SSD family. Unlike traditional TLC/MLC-NAND used in previous 840 series, the 850 Pro utilizes the new V-NAND technology to raise the read/write speeds and IO consistency even higher than most today mainstream SSDs could offer, while remains as an affordable option to the mainstream market.

This V-NAND technology -or also called 3D NAND- actually has been given to the consumer market before. If you have been on top with Intel for the last couple of year, you should immediately find the similarity with Intel Tri-gate Transistor technology in those i7 5820K, 5930K and 5960X.

So, what does it really do?

Basically V-NAND allows Samsung to stack layers of transistors on top of each other in a vertical, real cool Z-axis dimension; instead of spreading everything out like peanut butter on a carpet –which takes up more space and costs more money to produce. That’s so smart and innovative, right? Just like how people have done that concept to build tall, economical apartments approx 63 years before /s. But hey, it’s more difficult thus revolutionary when it comes to modern technology. Watch this video about V-NAND made by Samsung if you want a cool visual explanation.

Now besides the jump from TLC/MLC NAND to V-NAND, the fundamentals of 850 Pro are indeed the same as its siblings 840 and 840 EVO: triple-core MEX controller, SATA III interface.

However you can bet that the firmware are more carefully developed to push the new technology to the edges. For example, the 850 Pro comes with 10-year warranty simply because Samsung is very confident of the drive’s endurance which exceeds 150TB worth of data written to the drive in its entire lifetime (or 80GB per day for five consecutive years). Samsung also brags that during internal tests, the 850 Pro was still going strong and happy even after 8,000TB writes –not 8TB, not 80TB, not even 800TB but over 9000. .oh…8000TB (damn it, so close!). Still, that is super impressive.

The Differences between Crucial MX200, MX100, BX100 and M500 Series.

Another great benefit from 3D NAND is data and power efficiency.

Because the platform is now structured vertically, packets can be delivered and retrieved quicker and at a more consistent interval. And also because of that, power consumption has been reduced to a mere 3W during taxing reads or writes.

Most benchmarks you may find for 850 Pro show that this series performs extremely well under normal and stress condition. With the support of RAPID technology – that can be enabled using Samsung proprietary Magician software – the 850 Pro easily tops the chart in anything you throw at it. With that being said, I’m really excited to have a new candidate for another super green mini home theater pc this coming month.

RAPID, short for Real-time Accelerated Processing of I/O Data, is a Samsung’s proprietary feature that automatically uses a portion of system memory as a temporary, larger and faster cache on top of the DRAM and main NAND.

How’s Samsung 850 EVO compared to 850 Pro ?

A week into December and Samsung brought early Christmas present to the party. Things like this would have broke the Internet by no doubt but in reality, most of us are saving that moment for Half-life 3 or when Leo actually won an Oscar…however, out of all blessed things, apparently the color of a dress has accomplished that.

Now back with the game, the 850 EVO comes with the brand new and long-awaited NAND technology that Samsung teased us a few months back –the 128Gbit TLC 3D V-NAND. Keyword: TLC –no, not the cable network for those who question.

As you already remember –the 840 series is one of the first SSD to use TLC and successful proves that this type of flash memory is just as fast, as durable and as great as traditional upper-tier MLC NAND when done right. Today breakthrough is the structure of 850 EVO’s TLC now built like a deck of cards — 32 layers all stacked up just like the 850 Pro.

The strong advantage of vertical layers for a NAND is the power efficiency as well as the overall endurance. The 850 EVO now can take the beating up to 75TB of total writes for its 120GB and 250GB models. The 500GB and 1TB won’t get tired until 150TB of total writes. That simply puts the level of TLC V-NAND used in 850 EVO in almost the same measures as MLC V-NAND in 850 Pro. One can’t simply wear out this drive under normal work load. It will sit there and work diligently during your entire trip from the Shire to Mordor and back again, if that matters.

GTX 960 vs. GTX 970 vs. GTX 980 Graphics Cards.

SLC, MLC, TLC and Why ?

The first generation SSD in the market was expensive. They are fast because they use Single-level Cell (SLC). And as the name implies, its NAND Cell can only store 1-bit of data per cell —not a lot. As the NAND technology progressed we began to have MLC, or Multi-level Cell —and then Triple-level Cell (TLC). To be correct, TLC has been around much longer but only exists in cheaper USB flash drives due to their lower level of endurance; which makes them unsuitable for system storage. But let’s take a look of the differences between today TLC, MLC and SLC.

First, imagine three crazy girls and each one of them decides to build a barn for their pets. Mary has a little lamb, Jane has 2 horses and Cruella has 97 puppies.

Now the kind of animal that Mary, Jane and Cruella own isn’t important; but we all know they use their barn to keep the pet. Which is a normal thing everyone does.

Now I’m not sure about Mary, but having a single lamb for the whole barn is overkill, not to mention the costs of construction.

For Jane on the other hand, it’s still an investment but then she uses one barn for two horses and it’s sure cheaper than having to build two barns for two horses.

Which then brings us to the next lady. In this case, Cruella seems to be the most economical person because she has one barn for all 97 puppies.

Of the three girls, it’s easiest for Mary to find and take her pet out for a quick walk but it costs too much to build a barn for one pet where in reality, most people can’t afford it. If Mary has 10 lambs, that means she’d have to build 10 barns! Same reason Single-level Cell isn’t a great option for mainstream consumers.

On other hand, 2-bit per cell MLC is cheaper and still performance-efficient because if Jane has 10 horses, she only wants to build 5 barns. It also just takes a few minutes for her to gather all her pet or put them away. Plus it’s half the price Mary would have done.

Last of all, it’s cheapest for Cruella to keep her 97 puppies because it only takes one barn. The drawback is it’d take more time for her to retrieve all the little puppies out of the barn and put them in place. Not to mention what kind of damage these little guys could do to the barn, thus reducing its endurance level. That’s what TLC is about.

Then someone comes up with a 32-story barns. See, it’d take up a large area to build 32 barns adjacent to each other, lots of materials, labor works for each foundations and many other underlaying costs. Now it takes a whole lot less space to build a single barn with 32 levels (high-rise apartment life, anyone?). That single barn, as the matter of fact, could be bigger in rooms and wider in size and still doesn’t require as much land as 32 different barns.

It’s the best invention for Cruella because if she has all the puppies, she can separate them to different levels of the 32-story barn. And because the space is larger, every puppy has more room to play and run around so they wouldn’t feel bored and chew the walls out. That’s how V-NAND TLC is a great improvement to traditional TLC. And if the SSD manufacturer implements an intelligent firmware/controller, there isn’t much sacrifice in performance between MLC and TLC under normal use circumstances.

Another change that’s introduced with 850 EVO’s 120GB, 250GB and 500GB in particular is the dual-core MGX controller while this series’s 1TB model still uses the same Triple-core MEX found in 850 Pro. Now according to Samsung, you can rest assure that one fewer core doesn’t impact the performance of the drive in anyway. This helps Samsung on the production cost and perhaps it’s also a good thing for the end-users in term of pricing.

So if everything sounds so good, what’s the draw back? The 850 EVO is quite well rounded that in order to find its fault, we will have to sit here and split baby hair to pick the Cons. With V-NAND technology blessing on TLC like Castiel found his grace, now it is as fast/faster than most consumer-graded MLC in the market besides Samsung 850 Pro. Hell, it would even outlast them in endurance level.

If anything, it would be the firmware that those who had problem with the notorious performance-degraded issue on 840 Series should be concerned about. I trust that Samsung have learned that little yet significant lesson and got everything right this time for the market that loving and supporting them.

For now, 850 EVO is obviously the best price and best choice for any mainstream or gaming PC builds, while the 850 Pro becomes the great candidate for basic enterprise server, high-end workstation and heavy-duty multimedia production computers.

The Differences between Sandisk Ultra Plus, Ultra II and Extreme PRO

Here’s quick comparison of Samsung SSD family.

  • 850 Pro
  • 850 EVO
  • 840 EVO
  • 840 Pro

Samsung 850 Pro

  • Sequential Read

    550MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (256GB, 512GB and 1TB)
    470MB/s (128GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    100K IOPS (128GB)
    100K IOPS (256GB)
    100K IOPS (512GB and 1TB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    90K IOPS (128GB)
    90K IOPS (256GB)
    90K IOPS (512GB and 1TB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (128GB)
    512MB (256GB & 512GB)
    1GB (1TB)

  • NAND Type

    40nm 86Gbit 32-layer 3D V-NAND 2-bit MLC

  • Internal Controller

    ARM-based Triple-core MEX 400MHz

  • Power Consumption

    2.5mW in DevSleep mode
    3.3W (read) and 3.0W (write)

  • Endurance

    150 freaking TB with 10-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256, TCG Opal 2. 0 & IEEE-1667

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

8,132 Reviews

Samsung Electronics Samsung 850 Pro-Series 2.534; 128GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive Single Unit Version MZ-7KE128BW 128 sata_6_0_gb 2.5-Inch MZ-7KE128BW

  • The World’s First Consumer SSD Powered by Samsung V-NAND Technology, Ideal for Hardcore PC…
  • Ultimate Sequential Read/Write Performance : Up to 550MB/s and 470MB/s Respectively, and…
  • Performance, Reliability, Energy Efficiency, and Industry-Leading 10-year Limited Warranty
  • Included Contents: 2.5” (7mm) SATA III (6GB/s) SSD & User Manual (All Other Cables,…

Samsung 850 EVO

  • Sequential Read

    520MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (250GB, 500GB and 1TB)
    520MB/s (120GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    94K IOPS (120GB)
    97K IOPS (250GB)
    98K IOPS (500GB and 1TB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    88K IOPS (120GB)
    88K IOPS (250GB)
    90K IOPS (500GB and 1TB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (120GB)
    512MB (250GB & 500GB)
    1GB (1TB)

  • NAND Type

    19nm 128Gbit 32-layer 3D V-NAND 3-bit TLC

  • Internal Controller

    Dual-core MGX (120GB, 250GB, 500GB)
    ARM-based Triple-core Cortex R4 MEX (1TB)

  • Power Consumption

    2mW in DevSleep mode
    3. 7W (read) and up to 4.4W (write)

  • Endurance

    75TB with 5-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256, TCG Opal 2.0 & IEEE-1667

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

1,103 Reviews

Samsung 850 EVO — 120GB — 2.5-Inch SATA III Internal SSD (MZ-75E120B/AM)

  • Powered by Samsung V-NAND Technology. Optimized Performance for Everyday Computing.
  • Incredible Sequential Read/Write Performance : Up to 540MB/s and 520MB/s Respectively, and…
  • Endurance, Reliability, Energy Efficiency, and a 5-Year Limited Warranty
  • Included Contents: 2.5” (7mm) SATA III (6GB/s) SSD, User Manual, & Samsung Data…

Samsung 840 EVO

  • Sequential Read

    540MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (250GB, 500GB, 750GB, 1TB)
    410MB/s (120GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    94K IOPS (120GB)
    97K IOPS (250GB)
    98K IOPS (750GB and 1TB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    35K IOPS  (120GB)
    66K IOPS  (120GB)
    90K IOPS  (120GB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (120GB)
    512MB (250GB and 500GB)
    1GB (750GB and 1TB)

  • NAND Type

    19nm Toggle DDR 2. 0 NAND 3-bit TLC

  • Internal Controller

    ARM-based Triple-core MEX 400MHz

  • Power Consumption

    3.1mW idle.
    3.82W (read) and 3.85W (write)

  • Endurance

    40TB (120GB, 250GB) or 80TB (500GB, 1TB) with 3-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256 FDE, PSID

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

2,599 Reviews

Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 120GB 2.5-Inch SATA III Single Unit Version Internal Solid State Drive MZ-7TE120BW

  • Highest-quality components and engineering from the #1 memory manufacturer
  • Worry-free data security with AES 256-bit full-disk encryption
  • No moving parts means no hard drive spin ups, no noise and superior data protection
  • An innovative lightweight design that allows you to work smarter and play longer.

Samsung 840 PRO

  • Sequential Read

    540MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (256GB and 512GB)
    390MB/s (128GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    97K IOPS (128GB)
    100K IOPS (256GB)
    100K IOPS (512GB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    90K IOPS  (128GB)
    90K IOPS  (256GB)
    90K IOPS  (512GB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (128GB)
    512MB (256GB and 512GB)

  • NAND Type

    Samsung 21nm Toggle-Mode MLC

  • Internal Controller

    ARM-based Cortex-R4 Triple-core MDX 300MHz

  • Power Consumption

    5. 4mW idle.
    average 6.9W

  • Endurance

    100TB with 5-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256, Class0 SED

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite
  • 850 EVO
  • 850 Pro
  • 840 EVO
  • 840 Pro

Samsung 850 EVO

  • Sequential Read

    520MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (250GB, 500GB and 1TB)
    520MB/s (120GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    94K IOPS (120GB)
    97K IOPS (250GB)
    98K IOPS (500GB and 1TB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    88K IOPS (120GB)
    88K IOPS (250GB)
    90K IOPS (500GB and 1TB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (120GB)
    512MB (250GB & 500GB)
    1GB (1TB)

  • NAND Type

    19nm 128Gbit 32-layer 3D V-NAND 3-bit TLC

  • Internal Controller

    Dual-core MGX (120GB, 250GB, 500GB)
    ARM-based Triple-core Cortex R4 MEX (1TB)

  • Power Consumption

    2mW in DevSleep mode
    3. 7W (read) and up to 4.4W (write)

  • Endurance

    75TB with 5-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256, TCG Opal 2.0 & IEEE-1667

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

1,103 Reviews

Samsung 850 EVO — 120GB — 2.5-Inch SATA III Internal SSD (MZ-75E120B/AM)

  • Powered by Samsung V-NAND Technology. Optimized Performance for Everyday Computing.
  • Incredible Sequential Read/Write Performance : Up to 540MB/s and 520MB/s Respectively, and…
  • Endurance, Reliability, Energy Efficiency, and a 5-Year Limited Warranty
  • Included Contents: 2.5” (7mm) SATA III (6GB/s) SSD, User Manual, & Samsung Data…

Samsung 850 Pro

  • Sequential Read

    550MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (256GB, 512GB and 1TB)
    470MB/s (128GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    100K IOPS (128GB)
    100K IOPS (256GB)
    100K IOPS (512GB and 1TB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    90K IOPS (128GB)
    90K IOPS (256GB)
    90K IOPS (512GB and 1TB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (128GB)
    512MB (256GB & 512GB)
    1GB (1TB)

  • NAND Type

    40nm 86Gbit 32-layer 3D V-NAND 2-bit MLC

  • Internal Controller

    ARM-based Triple-core MEX 400MHz

  • Power Consumption

    2. 5mW in DevSleep mode
    3.3W (read) and 3.0W (write)

  • Endurance

    150 freaking TB with 10-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256, TCG Opal 2.0 & IEEE-1667

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

8,132 Reviews

Samsung Electronics Samsung 850 Pro-Series 2.534; 128GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive Single Unit Version MZ-7KE128BW 128 sata_6_0_gb 2.5-Inch MZ-7KE128BW

  • The World’s First Consumer SSD Powered by Samsung V-NAND Technology, Ideal for Hardcore PC…
  • Ultimate Sequential Read/Write Performance : Up to 550MB/s and 470MB/s Respectively, and…
  • Performance, Reliability, Energy Efficiency, and Industry-Leading 10-year Limited Warranty
  • Included Contents: 2.5” (7mm) SATA III (6GB/s) SSD & User Manual (All Other Cables,…

Samsung 840 EVO

  • Sequential Read

    540MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (250GB, 500GB, 750GB, 1TB)
    410MB/s (120GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    94K IOPS (120GB)
    97K IOPS (250GB)
    98K IOPS (750GB and 1TB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    35K IOPS  (120GB)
    66K IOPS  (120GB)
    90K IOPS  (120GB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (120GB)
    512MB (250GB and 500GB)
    1GB (750GB and 1TB)

  • NAND Type

    Samsung 19nm 3bpc TLC Toggle DDR 2. 0 NAND

  • Internal Controller

    ARM-based Triple-core MEX 400MHz

  • Power Consumption

    3.1mW idle.
    3.82W (read) and 3.85W (write)

  • Endurance

    40TB (120GB, 250GB) or 80TB (500GB, 1TB) with 3-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256 FDE, PSID

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

2,599 Reviews

Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 120GB 2.5-Inch SATA III Single Unit Version Internal Solid State Drive MZ-7TE120BW

  • Highest-quality components and engineering from the #1 memory manufacturer
  • Worry-free data security with AES 256-bit full-disk encryption
  • No moving parts means no hard drive spin ups, no noise and superior data protection
  • An innovative lightweight design that allows you to work smarter and play longer.

Samsung 840 PRO

  • Sequential Read

    540MB/s

  • Sequential Write

    520MB/s (256GB and 512GB)
    390MB/s (128GB)

  • 4KB Random Read

    97K IOPS (128GB)
    100K IOPS (256GB)
    100K IOPS (512GB)

  • 4KB Random Write

    90K IOPS  (128GB)
    90K IOPS  (256GB)
    90K IOPS  (512GB)

  • DRAM (LPDDR2)

    256MB (128GB)
    512MB (256GB and 512GB)

  • NAND Type

    Samsung 21nm Toggle-Mode MLC

  • Internal Controller

    ARM-based Cortex-R4 Triple-core MDX 300MHz

  • Power Consumption

    5. 4mW idle.
    average 6.9W

  • Endurance

    100TB with 5-year warranty

  • Encryption

    AES-256, Class0 SED

  • Support RAPID, TurboWrite

3 Best Z97 Gaming Motherboards That Don’t Break The Bank

Benchmarks FYI

Desktop IOmeter – 4K Random Read
Samsung 850 Pro 1TB 105.6 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 500GB 103.9 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 250GB 101.6 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 120GB 101.6 pts
Samsung 840 Pro 512GB 103.0 pts
Samsung 850 Pro 128GB 98.1 pts
Samsung 850 Pro 512GB 97.9 pts
Samsung 840 EVO 1TB 96.0 pts
Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 94.0 pts
Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 91. 7 pts
Crucial M550 1TB 95.2 pts
Crucial MX100 512GB 90.6 pts
Desktop IOmeter – 4K Random Write
Crucial MX100 256GB 309.2 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 500GB 301.7 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 250GB 298.6 pts
Samsung 850 Pro 512GB 292.7 pts
Samsung 850 Pro 256GB 292.4 pts
Samsung 850 Pro 1TB 291.9 pts
Samsung 840 Pro 512GB 287.7 pts
Crucial M550 1TB 287.2 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 1TB 285.5 pts
Samsung 840 EVO 1TB 271.9 pts
Samsung 850 EVO 120GB 170.2 pts
Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 147.8 pts

Last thought — Be sure to prepare your BIOS for a SSD (AHCI Mode) if you plan on buying one. I’d also love to see more competitors rise up for the challenge, though. Crucial’s current best bet is the MX200 and for Sandisk, that would be the Extreme Pro II series. But at the mean time, my guess is the 850 Pro and 850 EVO will totally dominate the SSD market this fengshui year.

Upgrading to SSD ? Here are some recommended accessories.

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SILVERSTONE SDP08 3.5 to 2 X 2.5-Inch Bay Converter

  • Converts 3.5″ hard drive bay to hold up to 2 X 2.5″ HDD or SDD
  • Compatible with any computer cases equipped with 3.5″ drive bays
  • Supports all types of 2.5″ HDD or SSD
  • Quick and easy-to-use screw pack included for installation

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Apricorn SATA Wire Notebook Hard Drive Upgrade Kit with USB 3.0 Connection ASW-USB3-25 (Grey)

  • Connects to any 2. 5 inch SATA Hard Drive or Solid State Drive
  • Creates a Super Speed USB 3.0 interface to a 2.5-Inch SATA Drive
  • Clone your hard drive in a fraction of the time
  • Perfect for upgrading your notebook hard drive or transferring data to bare drives

Samsung 860 Pro review: Nowhere near as good as the 860 Evo

Samsung’s Pro range of SSDs have always had a hard time in the face of their cheaper Evo counterparts. On the face of it, they’re meant to be faster and longer-lasting — the very best SSD for gaming, so to speak — but when the Samsung 850 Evo and 960 Evo proved to be pretty much just as quick as their respective Pro siblings for a lot less cash, they’ve become increasingly hard to justify. Unless you regularly move hundreds of GBs of files around your PC on a daily basis, Samsung’s Evo SSDs are more than enough for your typical gamer.

The 860 Pro is no different. Speed-wise, Samsung claims it’s a fraction faster than both the outgoing 850 Pro and incoming 860 Evo with a sequential read speed of up to 560MB/s and a sequential write speed of up to 530MB/s, but in reality they’re all pretty much identical. Why, then, should you consider the 860 Pro? It’s all to do with endurance.

In much the same way as the 860 Evo took the 850 Evo’s endurance to the next level, the 860 Pro goes one further, offering up to a mahoosive 4800 terabytes written (TBW) for the top 4TB model. That’s double what the 860 Evo offers at 4TB, and eight times more than the 600 TBW you got with the 4TB 850 Pro.

Lower capacities benefit, too. Whereas before you only got 150 TBW for the 256GB model or 300 TBW for the 512GB and 1TB models of the 850 Pro, you now get 300 TBW as standard on the 256GB 860 Pro, 600 TBW for the 512GB edition and 1200 TBW for the 1TB version. 2TB 860 Pro owners, meanwhile, get 2400 TBW, an improvement of almost 2000 TBW over the 2TB 850 Pro.

Impressive stuff, but before you get dazzled by the numbers, consider this: while the 850 Pro gave you a generous ten-year warranty, the new 860 Pro only gives you a five-year warranty. Yes, you’ve got significantly more TBs to play with, but it still doesn’t seem nearly as good value.

Of course, much like I said in my Samsung 860 Evo review, endurance is a tricky beast to actually test when you haven’t been using it constantly over a number of years. Therefore, what I can say about 860 Pro right now is pretty much limited to fast it is, which (as it turns out) isn’t actually that much quicker than the 860 Evo.

In fact, the 1TB 2.5in model of the Samsung 860 Pro I had in for testing was almost universally slower than the 2TB 2.5in 860 Evo I was sent. I tested them with the same system, too, which comprises of a 3.6GHz Intel Core i5-8600K processor, 16GB of Corsair Vengeance 3000MHz RAM and an Asus Prime Z370-P motherboard.

It wasn’t much slower, all told, but take AS SSD’s 1GB sequential test, which reads and writes 1GB of files in adjacent locations on an SSD’s storage. Here, the 860 Pro managed 522.08MB/s read and 489.82MB/s write. The 860 Evo, on the other hand, pipped it to the post on both occasions with speeds of 524.45MB/s read and 496.29MB/s write. That’s not great when the Pro’s meant to be the faster drive and enabling the 860 Pro’s Rapid mode in Samsung’s Magician software did little to improve things either, increasing its read speed to just 525.35MB/s and write speed to 490.88MB/s.

The 860 Pro closed the gap in AS SSD’s 1GB random 4K test, which reads and writes 1GB worth of 4K chunks in random locations on an SSD drive, but only slightly. This is a much more accurate representation of the speeds you’re likely to see in everyday use, but even multiple retests only saw the 860 Pro produce a read speed of 40.33MB/s and write speed of 98.88MB/s with Rapid mode left off, and 41.60MB/s and 100.80MB/s with Rapid mode enabled. The 860 Evo, by comparison, was just a hair’s breadth behind with 40.27MB/s and 98.25MB/s respectively.

CrystalDiskMark’s strenuous workstation-grade random 4K 8-queue-8-thread test painted a similar picture as well, with the 860 Evo matching the Pro on read speed, coming in at 403MB/s apiece, and edging ahead on write speed with 360MB/s as opposed to the Pro’s 358MB/s.

Granted, it’s not a huge difference, but I’d expect more given the veritable canyon between their respective prices. The 256GB 860 Pro, for instance, currently costs £126 / $140, while the 860 Evo comes in at just £90 / $95. The gap only gets more pronounced as you go up in capacity, too, with £63 / $80 separating the 512GB models, £123 / $150 sitting between 1TB drives and a hefty £226 / $300 dividing the 2TB sizes.

As a result, unless you’re really going to use all those extra thousands of TBW, you could save yourself a significant chunk of change by opting for the 860 Evo instead. You don’t have to make any compromise on speed, and the 860 Evo’s endurance is still light years ahead of anything else, making it much better value for money.

In fact, those in the UK needn’t even spend that much, as Samsung’s equally zippy 850 Evo is still widely available from around £80. That particular boat has already sailed in the US sadly, with 850 Evo stock growing increasingly scarce, but UK folk should seriously consider opting for the 850 Evo if you want to grab yourself a bargain. After all, while the 850 Evo may not be guaranteed for as many TBW, you still get that tasty five-year warranty, putting you in just as good a position as its successor if it happens to go kaput before you reach your capacity’s maximum TBW limit. Either way, the 860 Pro just isn’t worth the extra cash, so do yourself a favour and (once again) get an Evo instead.

Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB vs Samsung 860 Evo 1TB mSATA: What is the difference?

Type of SSD drive.

SSD cache

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB)

DRAM drive

Solid state drives/SSDs with DRAM flash memory use high-speed RAM as a buffer/cache. Performance is faster than non-DRAM SSDs that use slower NAND flash or system RAM (HMB).

This is an NVMe SSD

✖Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB

✖Samsung 860 Evo 1TB mSATA

NVMe SSDs use the PCIe interface, which has a higher bandwidth than the SATA interface. This results in much faster read/write speeds compared to SSDs using the SATA interface.

built-in memory

1000GB

Built-in memory is the built-in space for storing system data, applications, and user data in the device. With more internal storage, you can store more files and apps on your device.

Storage type SSD

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB)

The storage type determines how many bits of data are written to each memory location. These storage types include SLC (one bit per cell), MLC (two bits per cell), and TLC (three bits per cell). The fewer bits written to each cell, the higher the speed and reliability.

PCI Express (PCIe) version

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB)

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 860 Evo 1TB mSATA)

PCI Express (PCIe) is a high speed expansion card standard that is used to connect a computer to its peripherals. Newer versions support higher throughput and provide better performance.

Controller channels

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB)

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 860 Evo 1TB mSATA)

The controller is the processor that controls the functions of the SSD. The number of channels indicates the number of memory chips that this controller can access at the same time. As a general rule, the more channels an SSD controller has, the better the performance.

Terabytes written (TBW)

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB)

Terabytes written (TBW) is a measure of the lifespan of an SSD and is often covered by the manufacturer’s warranty. A higher TBW may indicate greater reliability over a longer period of time.

MTBF

Unknown. Help us offer a price. (Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB)

1. 5million hours

MTBF is the manufacturer’s estimate of the average amount of time a device will run before it fails.

Linux kernel developers have finally released fixes for Samsung SSD SATA 860 and 870 series drives / Sudo Null IT News . After three years of bickering with users, the developers of the libata-core.c drive subsystem in Linux have finally accepted user-suggested patches.


Samsung used to make optical drives that didn’t read discs well. Then there were HDD drives, which often failed and broke. Therefore, it was not surprising to find errors in solid state drives from this manufacturer. You can find their signs by searching for «FPDMA QUEUED» in the dmesg output. Samsung SSDs have had patches in the Linux kernel for a long time.

Old libata-core.c code to deal with Samsung SATA SSD errors:

 { "Samsung SSD 840*", NULL, ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_ZERO_AFTER_TRIM, },
{ "Samsung SSD 850*", NULL, ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_ZERO_AFTER_TRIM, }, 

Therefore, it was surprising to learn from Samsung representatives that the new 860 series SSD, released in early 2018, has been corrected. As it turned out, the old errors remained there, and new ones appeared.

First error — for 840-870 series:

Samsung SATA SSDs can corrupt data when running the Queued TRIM command, which is used in Linux (but not in Windows, as Microsoft developers do not consider it useful). SATA controllers are affected by Intel, AMD AM4 chipsets (older ones have more severe errors — see below), Asmedia, Marvell and others. Treated by disabling Queued TRIM. Users of some Linux distributions did not see this error due to disabling this feature by the distribution creators. Often there is an unspoken rule: «If Windows does not use some feature, then it is better for us not to use it, because hardware manufacturers refuse to deal with the mistakes of non-Windows users.»

Second error — for 860-870 series:

Samsung SATA SSD drives can corrupt data and reduce speed by several times when working with SATA ports connected to ATI-AMD southbridges. This is where Windows can fail. SATA controllers in AM3+ and older southbridges (SB 950 and older) are affected. It is cured by disabling NCQ for all chipsets with Vendor ID = 0x1002 (ATI). The speed of SSD drives drops from this by 2-3 times (up to 10 times in some tests).

The libata-core.c code for dealing with Samsung SATA SSD errors now looks like this:

 { "Samsung SSD 840*", NULL, ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_ZERO_AFTER_TRIM, },
{ "Samsung SSD 850*", NULL, ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_ZERO_AFTER_TRIM, },
{ "Samsung SSD 860*", NULL, ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_ZERO_AFTER_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_ON_ATI, },
{ "Samsung SSD 870*", NULL, ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_ZERO_AFTER_TRIM |
ATA_HORKAGE_NO_NCQ_ON_ATI, }, 

But there is also

Third error — for unknown series: Samsung SATA SSDs will fail when running in devices with power saving enabled on SATA controllers. Notebooks with power saving enabled are affected. Some controllers do not use power saving by default, but start doing so when you install the TLP package. It is installed by default for laptops in some distributions. Example: openSUSE.

Firmware updates for Samsung SATA SSD drives have not yet corrected these errors. SATA SSD drives with Phison, Marvell chips and others work well on the same hardware.

For a long time, Linux developers have been dragging their feet with user requests to add patches for buggy Samsungs, claiming that “your power supply is acting up there”. An additional push for applying patches was the release in 2021 of the 870th series of SATA SSDs with the same errors as in the 860th.

These patches are already applied in Linux distributions. As usual, you can change the default behavior to the desired one using the kernel options. Can be configured down to a single SATA port. There is a better way — to use an NVMe SSD (suitable for older systems as well).

Recently, the head of Samsung, under pressure from the authorities, was released early from prison, where he served time for bribing the previous president (president) of South Korea and other cases.