Vega 56 thermal specifications: SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX VEGA56 8GB HBM2

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX VEGA56 8GB HBM2

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6800 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 16GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2310 MHz, 16GB/256 bit DDR6. 16 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6800 Gaming Graphics Card with 16GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2170 MHz, 16GB/256 bit DDR6. 16 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6750 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 12GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2618 MHz, 12GB/192 bit DDR6. 18 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6700 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 12GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2581 MHz, 12GB/192 bit DDR6. 16 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6700 Gaming Graphics Card with 10GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2495 MHz, 10GB/160 bit DDR6. 16 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6650 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 8GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2635 MHz, 8GB/128 bit DDR6. 17.5 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6600 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 8GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2593 MHz, 8GB/128 bit DDR6. 16 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6600 Gaming Graphics Card with 8GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2491 MHz, 8GB/128 bit DDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6500 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 4GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2825 MHz, 4GB/64 bit DDR6. 18 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6500 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 8GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2855 MHz, 8GB/64 bit DDR6. 18 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE AMD Radeon™ RX 6400 Gaming Graphics Card with 4GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2

Up to 2321 MHz, 4GB/64 bit DDR6. 16 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5500 XT 8G GDDR6

 Up to 1845 MHz, 8GB/128 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5500 XT SF 4G GDDR6

 Up to 1845 MHz, 4GB/128 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5500 XT SF 8G GDDR6

 Up to 1845 MHz, 8GB/128 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5600 XT 6G GDDR6

 Up to 1750 MHz, 6GB/192 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5600 XT BE 6G GDDR6

 Up to 1620 MHz, 6GB/192 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

*No Quick Connect Fan / Dual BIOS

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5500 XT 4G GDDR6

 Up to 1845 MHz, 4GB/128 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5700 8G GDDR6 with Tri-X Cooling

 Up to 1750 MHz, 8GB/256 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5700 XT 8G GDDR6

 Up to 1925 MHz, 8GB/256 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5700 BE 8G GDDR6

 Up to 1750 MHz, 8GB/256 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

*No Quick Connect Fan / Dual BIOS

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE RX 5700 XT BE 8G GDDR6

 Up to 1925 MHz, 8GB/256 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

*No Quick Connect Fan / Dual BIOS

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon™ RX 5700 8G GDDR6

Up to 1750 MHz, 8GB/256 bit GDDR6. 14 Gbps Effective

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 590 8GB GDDR5

Up to 1545 MHz, 8G5, 1440p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 580 8GB GDDR5

Up to 1366 MHz, 8G5, 1440p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 580 8GB GDDR5 OC Lite

Up to 1350 MHz, 8G5, 1440p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 580 4GB GDDR5

Up to 1366 MHz, 4GB GDDR5, 1440p gaming.

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 8GB GDDR5

Up to 1284 MHz, 8GB GDDR5, 1080p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 8GB GDDR5 Lite

Up to 1284 MHz, 8GB GDDR5, 1080p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 8GD5

Up to 1254 MHz, 8GB GDDR5, 1080p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 4GB G5

Up to 1284 MHz, 4GB GDDR5, 1080p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 8GB GDDR5 HDMI DP

Up to 1284 MHz, 8GB GDDR5, 1080p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 4GB G5 HDMI DP

Up to 1284 MHz, 4GB GDDR5, 1080p gaming

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 ITX 8GB GDDR5

170 mm card length,  1244 MHz, 8GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 570 ITX 4GB GDDR5

170 mm card length,  1244 MHz, 4GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 4GB GDDR5 14 CU

896 stream processors, 1226 MHz, 4GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 4GB GDDR5 14 CU

Dual fan, 896 stream processors, 1216 MHz, 4GB  GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 2GB GDDR5 14 CU

896 stream processors, 1226 MHz, 2GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 2GB GDDR5 14 CU (45W)

896 Stream processors, external power connector not required

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 4GB GDDR5 16 CU

1024 stream processors, 1300 MHz, 4GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 4GB GDDR5 16 CU (45W)

1024 Stream processors, external power connector not required

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 2GB GDDR5 16 CU

1024 stream processors, 1300 MHz, 2GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 560 2GB GDDR5 16 CU (45W)

1024 Stream processors, external power connector not required

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 550 4GB GDDR5

1206 MHz, 4GB GDDR5. External power connector not required.

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 550 4GB GDDR5

640 stream processors, 1071 MHz, 4GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 550 2GB GDDR5

1206 MHz, 2GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 550 2GB GDDR5 640SP

640 stream processors, 1071 MHz

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon 550 2GB GDDR5 64BIT

512 stream processors, 1206 MHz

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 550 4GB GDDR5 Low Profile

Low profile, 1206 MHz, 4GB GDDR5

Learn More

SAPPHIRE PULSE Radeon RX 550 4GB GDDR5 640 SP Low Profile

640 Stream Processors, Low profile, 1071 MHz, 4GB GDDR5

Learn More

Temperatures, Clock Rates & Overclocking

Skip to main content

Tom’s Hardware is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Here’s why you can trust us.

Temperatures, Clock Rates & Overclocking

Overclocking & Undervolting

Conventional overclocking through a higher power limit and more aggressive clock rate is a dead-end. Brute force just isn’t the answer. Because Gigabyte had to follow AMD’s guidelines, this implementation is already running at its limit. Sure, you could dial in higher fan speeds to cool things down, creating more noise in the process, but who really wants that? As we explained in AMD RX Vega 64: The Tom’s Hardware Liquid Cooled Edition, even with higher frequencies and brutal power adjustments, it is almost impossible to get Radeon RX Vega running much faster. Instead, undervolting can achieve far better results.

First and foremost, the use of a suitable utility like OverdriveNTool works wonders. As always, though, your results will also depend on the quality of your GPU. We can’t generalize; you’ll have to compare your improvements to ours.

Temperatures & Frequencies

We’re using the GPU temperature value exclusively because that’s what our test sample’s telemetry reports. Of course, the hot-spot temperature is a lot higher. Why? You can read all about in Does Undervolting Improve Radeon RX Vega 64’s Efficiency? On Gigabyte’s Radeon RX Vega 56 Gaming OC 8G, those readings are up to 15°C higher. But they never hit a level that could cause problems.

The following table shows a comparison of start and end values for temperatures and GPU (boost) frequencies:

Initial Value Final Value
Open Test Bench
GPU Temperature 44°C 74-75°C
GPU Clock Rate 1378 MHz 1352 MHz
Ambient Temperature 22°C 22°C
Closed Case
GPU Temperature 46°C 74-75°C
GPU Clock Rate 1378 MHz 1344 MHz
Air Temperature in Case 24°C 47°C

Temperature vs.

Frequency

To better illustrate our findings, we plotted temperatures and frequencies during our sample’s 15-minute warm-up phase:

Frequencies in the gaming loop are about 100 MHz higher than what we measured from AMD’s reference card. This average increase of ~10% results in 40W-higher power consumption, or a roughly 18% increase. But the frame rates only go up by 5-7%, which is not a good trade-off at all.

The results of our stress test look similar:

IR Image Analysis For The Board’s Back

To round out this section, we take a look at board temperatures across several different load levels. To keep the test setup as real-world as possible, we drilled a couple of small holes through the backplate at the points relevant to our IR measurements, and then cut out the thermal pads where necessary. Since the diameter of these holes is very small, they have no significant impact on the cooler’s performance.

Gaming

It’s easy to see that the card is already at its limits during our gaming loop. As long as you operate the Radeon RX Vega 56 Gaming OC 8G vertically on an open test bench, all values seem to be acceptable. But this may change quickly if the card is installed in a closed case instead.

Once we popped Gigabyte’s board into a closed case, we measured up to 6°C-higher temperatures at the voltage converters. It seems as though the fans only respond to GPU temperature, unfortunately. Even a slightly higher rotational speed would have dropped the temperatures by four or five degrees without becoming unpleasantly loud.

Stress Test

The stress test reflects slightly lower power consumption than our gaming benchmark, so the GPU stays a little cooler.

Even in a closed case, temperatures don’t increase by more than a couple of degrees. Still, the 92°C we measured on some of the voltage converters seems quite a bit higher than necessary.

MORE: Best Graphics Cards

MORE: Desktop GPU Performance Hierarchy Table

MORE: All Graphics Content

Current page:
Temperatures, Clock Rates & Overclocking

Prev Page Power Consumption

Next Page Cooling & Noise

Tom’s Hardware is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site .

©
Future US, Inc. Full 7th Floor, 130 West 42nd Street,
New York,
NY 10036.

PowerColor Red Devil RX VEGA 56 8GB HBM2: Specifications & Features

If you buy through a link on this site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you. Learn more

By ccokeman
   —   

» Discuss this article (1)

More

PowerColor Red Devil RX VEGA 56 8GB HBM2 Specifications:

Specifications

Graphics Engine

AXRX VEGA 56 8GBHBM2-2D2H/OC

Video Memory

8GB HBM2

Engine Clock

1500MHz OC setting

Memory Clock

800MHz(1. 6Gbps)

Memory Interface

2048bit

DirectX® Support

12

Bus Standard

PCIE 3.0

Standard Display Connectors

HDMI x2/ DP x2

Feature Support

OpenGL

Support

CrossFireX™ Technology

Support

AMD Stream Technology

Support

AMD Eyefinity Technology

Support

AMD Hypermemory

 

Maximum Resolution

VGA

N/A

DVI

N/A

DisplayPort

4096×2160

HDMI

4096×2160

Power Specs + Board Dimensions

Board Dimensions

316mm*150mm*55mm

Minimum System Power requirement (W)

750W

Extension Power Connector

Two 8-pin PCI Express Power connectors

 

PowerColor Red Devil RX VEGA 56 8GB HBM2 Features:

  • Mute Fan Technology 0db –Silent gaming: Mute Fan Technology intelligently turns off the fan below 60?, providing silent gaming during medium and low load while reducing power consumption simultaneously.
  • Platinum Power Kit—DirectFET: ? Digital controller and Super Capacitors for improved reliability, Superior power efficiency, Significantly low power loss, Better thermal protection. 
  • Twelve Phases Power supply: Offers sufficient power supply, Better temperature control, Deliver highest stability for overclocking.
  • BIOS with Three Modes: — Silent mode with Mute Fan technology ensures quiet operation, Std. mode pursues balanced gaming experience, low temperature with good OC capability, OC mode for gamers to push the limit of Red Devil
  • Red Devil Cooler: 2x8mm + 4x6mm heatpipes combining with more heatsinks efficiently dissipate the heat and card as cool as possible.
  • Red Devil Back plate: Red Devil back plate with additional cross bracket on HBM strengthens the protection of GPU.
  • AMD CrossFire™ Technology: Multi-GPU support offers superior scalability. Increase our gaming performance up to 2x with AMD CrossFire™ technology, 2.75x for TriFire configurations, or 3.75x with QuadFire configs.
  • AMD Eyefinty Technology: Run multiple displays from a single graphics board and expand your gaming field of view across all displays.
  • AMD XConnect™ Ready: Now it’s easier than ever to connect and use an external Radeon™ graphics card. With AMD XConnect™ technology, external GPU enclosures configured with Radeon™ Graphics can easily connect and disconnect to a compatible ultrathin notebook or 2-in-1 over Thunderbolt™ 31 at any time, just like a USB flash drive-a first for external GPUs!
  • HDMI: Integrated high speed HDMI output with 1080p 120Hz 3D Stereoscopic support, and 4K resolution display support.
  • Microsoft DirextX® 12: Get intense gaming performance and unrivalled image quality with stunning 3D visual effects, realistic lighting and lifelike imagery.
  • Microsoft Windows® 10 Support: Comprehensive OS supports the latest Windows10 functionality and Driver support. (** some products only support 64bit OS, please visit website on www.powercolor.com for details**)
  • Microsoft Windows® 7 Support: Comprehensive OS supports the latest Windows7 functionality and Driver support. (** some products only support 64bit OS, please visit website on www.powercolor.com for details**)
  • PCI Express 3.0: Delivers double the bandwidth per lane of PCIe Gen 2 for faster GPU.
  • Premium VR Ready: Experience beautifully rich and immersive VR environments and gameplay, augmented by player comfort and effortless compatibility. AMD LiquidVR™ technology, featuring ground-breaking Asynchronous Shaders, helps you avoid nausea and motion sickness during VR experiences. The Radeon™ RX Vega graphics card enables a fully immersive and comfortable VR experience.
  • Radeon™ Chill: A power-saving feature that dynamically regulates frame rate based on your in-game movements. Radeon™ Chill can improve power efficiency and can lower temperatures for supported products and games when enabled through Radeon™ Settings.
  • Radeon™ ReLive: Capture, stream and share your greatest moments and gaming wins with Radeon™ ReLive. Modify settings quickly, conveniently, and play seamlessly with the easily accessible in-game toolbar. Express yourself in bold new ways with custom scene layouts. Upload your latest highlights and let them be a conversation piece. It’s never been easier to build and grow your online community at anytime, anywhere.
  • TRUE AUDIO TECHNOLOGY: True to life echoes, convolution reverbs and fuller sounding environments with increased voices and audio objects deliver a richer and more immersive gaming soundscape.
  • UEFI Support: Better security by helping protect the pre-startup—or pre-boot—process against bootkit attacks and faster startup times and resuming from hibernation.
  • Virtual Super Resolution: Get quality that rivals 4K, even on a 1080p display while playing your favorite online games thanks to AMD’s VSR.

 

All information courtesy of PowerColor @ https://www.powercolor.com/product?id=1511341849#features

« Prev page Next page »

Related Products

PowerColor Red Devil RX VEGA 56 8GB HBM2 Review

AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 review

Years in development, the new Radeon RX Vega line is finally arriving — AMD’s return to the higher-end of GPU performance after concentrating its efforts more on the mainstream and budget sectors of the market. There’s no shortage of cutting-edge tech here: the Vega processor utilises 12.5 billion transistors on a very large 486mm2 area of silicon, the chip paired with two 4GB stacks of cutting-edge HBM2 memory. It’s a bigger chip than Nvidia’s GTX 1080 Ti and it has more memory bandwidth — however, the top-end RX Vega 64 offers performance more in line with GTX 1080, while the cut-down RX Vega 56 reviewed here is clearly aimed to compete with the GTX 1070. It does this job rather well.

Before we go on, it’s worth stressing that the Vega architecture has a lot of features that may not be utilised much — if at all — today, but could make a big difference in future. For example, the double-speed FP16 support found in PlayStation 4 Pro was pulled ahead of time from the Vega spec sheet (referred to as ‘rapid-packed math’), while AMD has incorporated the most fully featured implementation of DirectX 12 features found in any GPU to date. Meanwhile, the high bandwidth cache controller is an attempt to allow the GPU fast, low latency access to memory beyond the 8GB of onboard RAM.

  • Thinking about upgrading your gaming PC? Take a look at our recommendations for the best graphics cards on the market. Pairing your graphics card with one of the best gaming monitors is also important, so check out our latest picks!

Elsewhere, the basic layout of Vega looks remarkably similar to the Fiji processor at the heart of the last-gen Fury X, but AMD is keen to point out that every aspect of the GPU has been retooled. There are still 64 compute units and 4096 shaders in the processor — pared back to 56 and 3854 in this cut-down model — but these are ‘new’ compute units with an extended instruction set and a more efficient design. AMD has also sought out faster clocks from the Vega silicon. The last-gen Fiji topped out at 1050MHz, Polaris was coaxed to 1450MHz while Vega is set to hit an impressive 1700MHz — although, again, expect a hit to that in the pared back Vega 56.

Hitting these clocks clearly hasn’t been easy though: even in its reduced state, Vega is undoubtedly power-hungry compared to the competition, as we’ll see later on in this review. That’s borne out by the design of the reference card we’re looking at here: it has two eight-pin power inputs, an even beefier configuration than the Titan Xp, despite its 210W board power rating. By comparison, the GTX 1070 Founders Edition only requires one eight-pin power input, making it easier to integrate with lower-end and medium level power supplies.

The Vega 56 card itself is a robust reference model from a company with a mixed history here — the new offering is an all-metal design, well-built, and features a vapour chamber heatsink (utilised on both Vega 56 and 64), a spec point Nvidia reserves only for GTX 1080, 1080 Ti and current-gen Titan products. External ports are a simple trio of DisplayPort 1.4s along with HDMI 2.0 — a good enough selection, but dual-link DVI should really be included on a card of this class. In operation, the Vega 56 has a temperature limit of 85 Celsius, but typically runs significantly under that. What’s more, there are power saver, balanced and turbo options. We’re reviewing in the default balanced mode, but turbo adds a couple of per cent to performance but increases power consumption.

Radeon RX Vega 56 Radeon RX Vega 64 Radeon RX Vega 64 Watercooled
Compute Units 56 64 64
Stream Processors 3584 4096 4096
Base Clock 1156MHz 1247MHz 1406MHz
Boost Clock 1471MHz 1547MHz 1677MHz
HBM2 Memory 8GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Bandwidth 410GB/s 484GB/s 484GB/s
Peak FP32 Performance 10. 5TF 12.66TF 13.7TF
Board Power 210W 295W 345W

Before we diving into performance testing, AMD is making a very good point about a specific Radeon feature that proves transformative to gameplay — support for FreeSync. Variable refresh is a genuine game-changer, seeking to eliminate screen-tear and reducing the stutter you see when dropping frames with v-sync engaged. Once you have a VRR screen, it’s difficult to go back to a standard display. Now, of course, Nvidia has its own solution — G-Sync — and while the implementation is generally stronger and more uniform on those screens, they still command a significant price-premium. FreeSync, by contrast, is more likely to be a value-added extra with only a small cost increase. The bottom line is that the price for attaining a smooth variable refresh experience with a GTX 1070/Vega 56 level card is undoubtedly lower with AMD.

We’ll kick off our gaming analysis with a look at 1440p resolution — what we consider to be the best pixels vs performance target for running games at very high or ultra settings on this class of GPU hardware. Whether you’re using the standard 16:9 2560×1440 (as tested here), or else the ultrawide 3440×1440, you’re going to get an excellent experience from all of the cards tested here — high frame-rates and lots of eye-candy. It’s also fertile territory for FreeSync displays, a really good partner for the Vega 56.

For the arrival of RX Vega, we decided to beef up our GPU test suite with a couple of new entrants — Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare has impressed us with its immense level of optimisation and new rendering technologies. It’s also a title that generally runs better on AMD hardware (though Fury X doesn’t hold up so well here, curiously).

Also joining the fray is Ghost Recon Wildlands — the year’s best-selling game (in the UK at least). At ultra settings, this is one of the most GPU-heavy games we’ve tested, and it sucks up VRAM too, meaning that even at 1080p, the old Fury X really struggles here, artificially depressing its frame-rates the higher up the resolution chain you go.

1440p and its ultrawide variant offer the best quality levels and pixel-count for the Vega 56’s capabilities — and it’s ahead of the GTX 1070.

2560×1440 (1440p) RX Vega 56 R9 Fury X GTX 1070 GTX 1080 GTX 1080 Ti
Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 48.5 42.0 51.8 65.1 83.3
Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 69.2 64.4 63.1 76.0 92.9
Call of Duty Infinite Warfare, Max, Post-AA 112.9 90.6 97.5 113.8 124.7
Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 66.0 66.1 66.9 83.4 108.2
The Division, Ultra, SMAA 65.3 55.7 57.8 71.3 90.9
Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 69.3 58. 3 62.3 77.3 100.1
Ghost Recon Wildlands, Ultra, TAA 42.4 32.1 39.8 48.2 59.0
Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 93.5 82.9 83.8 103.4 127.1
Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 76.1 62.0 69.7 89.5 116.7
The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 72.9 61.4 68.0 84.1 109.5

Next up, 4K results — and a question. Is it possible to get a good native ultra HD experience from Vega 56/GTX 1070-class hardware? The established wisdom is that GTX 1080-class hardware is where you start in terms of running top-tier titles but we’ve found that combining the GPU with an adaptive sync screen is a game-changer, as we discovered when gaming on a 1070-powered laptop with a 4K G-Sync display. Tweak settings to remain above 40fps and you can have a great experience. The 30-60fps No Man’s Land — where previously you to put up with v-sync stutter or tearing — is no longer an issue with adaptive sync tech.

In order to can get an idea of scalability between resolutions, our benchmarks remain maxed out here and don’t represent an ideal gaming experience — it’s all about judging relative performance between GPUs with these numbers and in that respect, the Vega 56 extends its lead over GTX 1070 here by a couple of percentage points on most of the titles tested. Even with the depth of field issue, AC Unity draws level and the only area of parity remains the puzzling performance of Crysis 3 on the new hardware. Factoring out those outliers, the overall lead is 12.8 per cent in favour of the AMD card.

Elsewhere, there are other results that once again show the stock Vega 56 operating at a kind of mid-point between GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 performance — Ashes of the Singularity seems to have regained its lead on AMD hardware after some driver revision work by Nvidia, but The Division, Far Cry Primal, Ghost Recon Wildlands and COD Infinite Warfare represent half of our tested games where the Vega 56 posts significant results that sit midway between 1070 and 1080 performance.

The Hitman result is another outlier — Vega 56 is still faster than GTX 1070, but the average frame-rate result is impacted a touch by occasional stutter, seen across all resolutions. It hits hardest on scene changes (but manifests occasionally elsewhere too) and is unlikely to affect gameplay.

You can game at 4K effectively with this class of card, but judicious settings tweaks are required and an adaptive sync display is a game-changer for the experience.

3840×2160 (4K) RX Vega 56 R9 Fury X GTX 1070 GTX 1080 GTX 1080 Ti
Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 25.8 23.3 25.9 33.0 45.4
Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 54.4 48.8 48.7 60.2 76.8
Call of Duty Infinite Warfare, Max, Post-AA 70.4 60.0 58.5 75. 3 96.6
Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 31.4 32.1 31.9 40.3 53.3
The Division, Ultra, SMAA 36.8 33.3 32.1 40.3 52.3
Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 38.6 35.1 33.8 42.3 55.2
Ghost Recon Wildlands, Ultra, TAA 26.3 18.6 23.3 29.6 37.3
Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 53.1 48.4 48.4 60.9 75.9
Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 39.6 34.0 36.1 46.2 60.5
The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 41.1 37.6 37.4 47.6 64.1

If you want the highest frame-rates — but also the most variable gameplay experience — 1080p is the place to be. There are some remarkably high frame-rates here, but the averages don’t tell the story of the often janky experience you get here as you careen between CPU, GPU and even storage bottlenecks. It’s probably best seen here on the COD Infinite Warfare test, where 1080 and 1080 Ti hit the limit, with Vega 56 getting very close — the average grabbed down a touch by stutter you don’t seem to get on Nvidia cards.

We use benchmarks to get an idea of relative performance under identical workloads, but it’s fair to say that we’re hitting so many different limits here that’s it’s not hugely instructional in terms of getting value from your GPU. However, there are a couple of takeaways — principally in how competitive the Vega 56 is overall here at lower resolutions compared to the Fury X, GTX 1070’s prior competitor in this space.

Looking back at our Fury X review, we saw a GPU competitive with Nvidia at 4K resolutions, but with gradually worsening relative performance the lower down the resolution chain you went — we even saw it on the pixel-rich ultra-wide 1440p tests we carried out. The driver improved over time and performance improved but even here you can see that Fury X performance worse here against the 1070 than it is at higher pixel-counts. With Vega, the fact is that AMD is still faster than GTX 1070, by and large, or at least maintaining parity. Whether it’s down to the hardware design or driver optimisations is difficult to say but the numbers speak for themselves.

Whether you’re gaming with Nvidia or AMD though, it’s difficult to come to any conclusion other than that you’re leaving a lot of GPU power on the table by deploying such a powerful GPU on such a low resolution overall — RX 570, RX 580 and GTX 1060 offer a far more consistent experience overall for full HD gamers.

1080p offers the highest frame-rates but also the most inconsistent experience. You don’t get the best out of any of these GPUs at this resolution.

1920×1080 (1080p) RX Vega 56 R9 Fury X GTX 1070 GTX 1080 GTX 1080 Ti
Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 71. 4 66.8 81.0 99.3 124.8
Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 80.0 75.5 71.2 85.5 98.8
Call of Duty Infinite Warfare, Max, Post-AA 122.9 105.7 118.8 124.6 124.9
Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 102.8 102.3 106.7 129.1 161.6
The Division, Ultra, SMAA 89.4 73.7 81.6 98.6 125.3
Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 95.7 75.9 90.4 107.7 134.4
Ghost Recon Wildlands, Ultra, TAA 53.2 35.3 52.3 61.3 72.7
Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 125.9 106.4 112.6 133.4 152.1
Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 110. 5 86.5 107.7 133.9 173.3
The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 100.1 79.2 95.1 114.6 138.9

If the new AMD architecture has a weakness, it is power consumption, where the Vega 56 posted a 25 per cent increase in power consumption in our Crysis 3 stress test, where the card is handing in exactly the same performance as the GTX 1070. However, we’re clearly looking at a substantial improvement in terms of both efficiency and performance compared to the old Fury X.

You’ll note that a fully maxed out overclock sees power consumption go through the roof. Here we’re running the Vega 56 card with its power slider maxed at +50 per cent, core frequency bumped by 11 per cent and with HBM2 RAM pushed to 950MHz, putting the card on par with the Vega 64’s prodigious 484GB/s of memory bandwidth. Generally, this overclock provides anything between a seven per cent to 14 per cent performance uplift, but the fans need be adjusted upwards to keep temperatures in check. With that in mind, pushing Vega 56 hard is a task probably better suited to third party cards that are coming in Q4 this year.

As expected, those games where performance sits at a mid-point between GTX 1070 and 1080 performance can match the higher end card’s stock frame-rates, or get to within margin of error. The Division overclocks to 72.5fps vs the 71.3fps on GTX 1080, for example. Hitman and Ashes of the Singularity match GTX 1080, as does Far Cry Primal. We tested overclocking at 1440p resolution, so results may be even more favourable at 4K.

Another route forward is simply to overclock the HBM2 memory to 950MHz and leave everything else alone. This requires little extra power (we gave it an extra five per cent but it may not even require that), it won’t impact thermal performance that much (if at all) and we noted that in titles like Hitman and The Witcher 3, overclocking memory alone got you approximately half of the performance increase of the maxed OC results. It’s worth experimenting with as it is essentially free performance with no downsides — the best kind of overclocking, in our opinion.

This scene from Crysis 3 is easily repeatable and incurs a heavy, sustained load on the GPU — good for testing overclock stability and for measuring power draw. We retain our Core i7 6700K here, but disable its overclock.

RX Vega 56 RX Vega 56 OC R9 Fury X GTX 1080 Ti GTX 1080 GTX 1070
Peak System Power Draw 330W 457W 385W 384W 303W 263W

If you’re looking for an alternative to the GTX 1070, the bottom line is that you’re generally getting around 10 to 12 per cent of additional performance with the Vega 56, at the cost of some efficiency. It’s also interesting to note just how consistently the card out-performs its competitor — only oddments and bugs along with a strange turnout from Crysis 3 stop it from dominating across the board, even on titles that traditionally favour Nvidia hardware, such as Rise of the Tomb Raider.

Assuming the recommended US pricing holds up — and that the Ethereum mining boom doesn’t jack up the costs horrendously — the value on offer here is very good overall, especially if you own (or are considering) a 1440p or 4K FreeSync display, which pairs nicely with this product and constitutes one of the most profound gaming upgrades money can buy. At the time of writing, UK pricing is not available, but if it costs too much more than GTX 1070, that would take the shine off an impressive product.

How Vega 56 compares with its more expensive counterparts is something we are still in the process of testing. However, we’ve run some initial tests on the top-end liquid-cooled version of the Vega 64 (full review incoming — we’ve had only five days with these products, which is not ideal) and first impressions suggest that the Vega 56 offers around 85 per cent of the performance of the fully maxed Vega experience, and that gap may close up a little against the air-cooled version.

It’s early days with testing there, but it may well be the case that the Vega 56 isn’t just a great value contender against GTX 1070, but also its higher-end siblings too. We’ll try to get some further numbers to you as soon as possible, but it seems clear that the Vega 56 is AMD’s value play, where it performs very well indeed. Aside from the 2x eight-pin power input requirement and the lack of a DVI port for legacy display support, it’s difficult to find much fault with what AMD has delivered here — there’s strong performance out of the box, various routes forward with overclocking that deliver tangible results, and the quality of the reference card (the only Vega option for a while) also represents a big improvement over prior AMD efforts. It’s been a long time since AMD has challenged Nvidia at the higher-end, but Vega 56 hits the sweet spot — it’s a superb performer overall.

ROG-STRIX-RXVEGA56-O8G-GAMING | ROG Strix | Gaming Graphics Cards|ROG

OUTSHINE
THE COMPETITION

ROG Strix RX VEGA56 gaming graphics cards are packed with exclusive ASUS technologies, including all-new MaxContact Technology that is 2X more contact with GPU for improved thermal transfer, and Patented Wing-Blade IP5X-Certified Fans for maximum airflow and longer fan lifespan. While ASUS FanConnect II features 4-pin, hybrid-controlled headers connected to system fans for optimal system cooling. ASUS Aura Sync RGB LED synchronization enables a gaming system personalization and VR-friendly HDMI ports let gamers easily enjoy immersive virtual reality experiences. ROG Strix RX VEGA56 also has GPU Tweak II with XSplit Gamecaster that provides intuitive performance tweaking and instant gameplay streaming.

PERSONALIZED GAMING STYLE

ASUS Aura Sync

Outshine The Competition

Featuring Aura RGB Lighting on both the shroud and backplate, ROG Strix graphics cards are capable of displaying millions of colors and six different effects for a personalized gaming system. ROG Strix graphics cards also feature ASUS Aura Sync, RGB LED synchronization technology that enables complete gaming system personalization when the graphics card is paired with an Aura-enabled gaming motherboard.

Experience Aura
Color and Brightness

Experience Aura Lighting Effect

Static

Always on

Breathing

Fades in & out

Strobing

Flashes on & off

Color cycle

Fades between the colors of the rainbow

Music effect

Pulses to the beat of your music

GPU temperature

Changes color with GPU load

GAME COOL
AND PLAY SILENT

40% More Heat Dissipation Area

20%* Cooler and 3X Quieter Gaming Performance

New ROG Strix graphics are constructed with a 2.5-slot width, providing 40% more heat sink surface area for heat dissipation compared to previous 2-slot designs for dramatically cooler and quieter performance.

*Performance may vary by model.
**Images for reference only.

MaxContact Technology

2X More Contact with GPU for Improved Thermal Transfer

MaxContact is an industry-first GPU cooling technology, featuring an enhanced copper heat spreader that directly contacts the GPU. MaxContact utilizes precision machining to provide a surface that makes up to 2X more contact with the GPU than traditional heat spreaders, resulting in improved thermal transfer.

Patented Wing-Blade Design

Max Air Flow with 105% More Air Pressure

Patented wing-blade fans delivers maximum air flow and 105% greater static pressure over the heat sink, while operating at an up to 3X quieter volume than reference cards.

0dB Technology

Game in Complete Silence

Innovative 0dB technology stops the fan completely when the GPU temperature remains below a set level*, letting you enjoy light gaming in complete silence.

*55°C for ROG Strix RX VEGA56

IP5X-Certified Dust Resistance

Longer Fan Lifespan

The fans in ROG Strix graphics cards are certified under the International Protection Marking (IP code) as IP5X dust resistant for improved reliability and a longer lifespan. This stringent certification process ensures ROG Strix graphics cards provide optimal fan performance, even under severe conditions.

ASUS FanConnect II

Optimal System Cooling

ASUS FanConnect II features two 4-pin, hybrid-controlled headers that can be connected to both PWM and DC system fans for optimal system cooling. The connected fans reference both the GPU and CPU, operating automatically based on the one with the higher temperature. A comprehensive set of tuning options allow you to tune fan speeds for efficient cooling.

* Image for reference only. Actual PC layout may vary.

GPU Tweak II lets you easily set these ASUS FanConnect II modes:

Auto mode:
Chassis fan speeds reference GPU temperatures and operate based on the default factory setting.

Manual mode:
Allows you to set a fixed speed for connected fans.

User-defined mode:
Allows you to set chassis fans to reference either the CPU or GPU temperature to determine rotational speed. Additionally, a smart, automatic calibration routine senses the controllable range of connected fans and allows you to fine-tune speeds for efficient cooling and low noise.

PREMIUM QUALITY AND
BEST RELIABILITY

Auto-Extreme Technology

Industry-only 100% Automated Production Process

All ASUS graphics cards are now produced using Auto-Extreme Technology, an industry-exclusive, 100% automated production process that incorporates premium materials to set a new standard of quality. Auto-Extreme Technology ensures consistent graphics card quality as well as improved performance and longevity. Since the introduction of Auto-Extreme technology, reliability has improved by 30%.  This new manufacturing process is also environmentally friendly, eliminating harsh chemicals and reducing power consumption by 50%.

100% automation
Remove human fallibility from production

Fortify component
overclocking stability

Advanced and stringent
quality control

Advanced components design innovation

Smooth circuit board without sharp bumps

Flux-free production

Super Alloy Power II

Enhanced Durability and Efficiency

ASUS engineers have integrated premium alloy components into their graphics card designs to reinforce overall reliability. Super Alloy Power II components greatly enhance efficiency, reduce power loss and achieve thermal levels that are approximately 50% cooler than previous designs.

*This image is for illustration only, actual board design may vary.

GEAR UP FOR ULTIMATE GAMING EXPERIENCE

VR-friendly HDMI Ports

Easily Enjoy Immersive Virtual Reality Experience

ROG Strix graphics cards have two HDMI ports for connecting a VR device and display at the same time, so you can enjoy immersive virtual reality experiences anytime without having to swap cables.

Ramp up your PC with

ASUS Beyond VR Ready.

Your Need for Speed, Fulfilled

The Best Combo Ultra-smooth Gameplay

AMD FreeSync™ technology resolves the communication issues between processor and monitor, eliminating image tears and choppiness for effortlessly smooth gameplay. With ROG Strix gaming graphics cards and ASUS MG gaming monitors, scenes appear instantly, objects look sharper, and gameplay is super smooth, giving you a stunning visual experience and a serious competitive edge.

Learn more about ASUS gaming monitors at here.

GAME YOUR WAY

GPU Tweak II with XSplit Gamecaster

Intuitive Performance Tweaking

Redesigned with an intuitive, all-new UI, GPU Tweak II makes overclocking easier and more visual than ever, while still retaining advanced options for seasoned overclockers. With one click, the new Gaming Booster function maximizes system performance by removing redundant processes and allocating all available resources automatically.

Learn more at here.

Gaming Booster

One-click Performance Up

Visual effects:

Boost your performance by turning off windows visual effects.

System Services:

Automatically or manually turn off windows services or process.

Memory Defragmentation:

Re-arrange & free your system memory without closing any processes.

XSplit Gamecaster

Instant Gameplay Streaming

An included 1-year XSplit Gamecaster premium license* — a $99 USD value — lets you easily stream or record gameplay via a convenient, in-game overlay. The overlay also displays GPU clock speed, temperature, and VRM usage, and has GPU Tweak II controls, so gamers can choose a gaming profile and boost performance with just one click.

Learn more at here.

ROG Strix is the newest recruit into the Republic of Gamers. A series of specialized gaming gear designed for the rebel in all of us, Strix exemplifies ROG’s premier performance, innovative technology, and leading quality, but with its own confident and dynamic attitude. Featuring bold designs and bright colors, this exciting new series possesses a spirit of fierce individualism that charges every gaming experience with thrilling energy. ROG Strix equips players with the necessary speed and agility to dominate their game. A new generation of force has arrived. Join the Republic and experience the power of ROG Strix.

AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 and RX Vega 56 Official Details Announced

AMD’s Radeon RX Vega 64 and Radeon RX Vega 56 official presentation has just been released. The slides are part of the official presentation and give us details on specifications, performance and prices of AMD’s upcoming Radeon RX Vega graphics cards.

AMD Radeon RX Vega 64, RX Vega 56, Radeon RX Nano Card Specifications, Performance and Prices Detailed in Official Slides — Full RX Vega Launches on 14th August

It’s confirmed now that AMD will have two models of the Radeon RX Vega series available at launch and those will be Radeon RX Vega 64 and Radeon RX Vega 56. The Radeon RX Vega 64 family utilize the full Vega 10 GPU while the Radeon RX Vega 56 family utilizes a cut down die. The number that follows the family name represents the amount of NCUs so all Vega 64 graphics cards will feature 4096 stream processors while the Vega 56 graphics cards will feature 3584 stream processors.

AMD has also announced the new Radeon Pack promotion with their Radeon RX Vega graphics cards. These include the following:

  • Radeon AquaPack with RX Vega 64 Liquid Cooled for $699
  • Radeon Black Pack with RX Vega 64 Air Cooled for $599
  • Radeon Red Pack with RX Vega 56 for $499

The AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 Liquid, Air and reference models will be shipping with these packs. The starting price of the Radeon Red pack is $499 US for the reference model which grants you two free games (Wolfenstein II and Prey 2). The higher priced Radeon Black Pack for $599 US grants you the game and a $100 US discount on a Ryzen 7 CPU while the top end Radeon Aqua pack will get you all of the above plus $200 off of an Samsung ultra-wide FreeSync monitor for just $699 US.

There are three variants of Radeon RX Vega: Radeon RX Vega 64 Liquid Cooled Edition, engineered with 64 compute units to be the most powerful Radeon ever built; the Radeon RX Vega 64 with air cooling, and the Radeon RX Vega 56, available starting at just $399 USD SEP.

For a limited time in select regions, AMD and its industry partners are offering Radeon RX Vega purchasers an unprecedented assembly of gamer «must-haves» in new Radeon Packs, including deep discounts on select Ryzen multi-threaded CPUs and motherboards combos as well as select Samsung displays with Radeon FreeSync displays, and two extraordinary AAA game titles – all the ingredients necessary for the best possible PC gaming experience in one of the biggest industry collaborations ever seen. via AMD

AMD Radeon RX Vega Lineup Specifications – 12.5 Billion Transistors on a 14nm  484mm2 Die, 4096 Cores, 256 TMUs, Max Speed of 1700 MHz and 8 GB of HBM2 VRAM

The graphics chip will be utilizing the latest 14nm GFX9 core architecture which is based on the NCU (Next Compute Engine) design and measures approximately 484mm2. The Vega 10 graphics core deploys 12.5 billion transistors. The graphics chip will feature 64 Compute Units or 4096 stream processors and 256 TMUs. AMD plans on increasing the throughput of the chip through increased clock speeds. This will allow AMD to pump numbers better than the Fiji GPU which is based on the 28nm GCN 3.0 architecture and comes with the same number of cores, 4096 SPs.

There’s also 8 GB of HBM2 VRAM which comes in two stacks (4 GB per stack). The graphics card has a total rated bandwidth of 484 GB/s which is lower than the 512 GB/s on Fiji. It also features a pixel fill rate of 90 GPixels/s. Additionally, the cards will feature 4 MB of L2 cache and 45 MB of SRAM across the GPU. AMD will be launching all three variants of the Radeon RX Vega 64 and also the Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics cards at Capsaicin Siggraph so make sure to stay tuned for more info.

AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 and Vega 56 Graphics Card Lineup:

Graphics Card AMD Radeon R9 Fury X AMD Radeon RX Vega Nano AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 Reference AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 Reference AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 Limited AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 Liquid
GPU Fiji XT Vega 10 Vega 10 Vega 10 Vega 10 Vega 10
Process Node 28nm 14nm FinFET 14nm FinFET 14nm FinFET 14nm FinFET 14nm FinFET
Compute Units 64 TBD 56 64 64 64
Stream Processors 4096 TBD 3584 4096 4096 4096
Raster Operators 64 64 64 64 64 64
Texture Mapping Units 256 TBD 224 256 256 256
Clock Speed (Base) 1000 MHz TBD 1156 MHz 1247 MHz 1247 MHz 1406 MHz
Clock Speed (Max) 1050 MHz TBD 1471 MHz 1546 MHz 1546 MHz 1677 MHz
FP32 Compute 8. 6 TFLOPs TBD 10.5 TFLOPs 12.6 TFLOPs 12.6 TFLOPs 13.7 TFLOPs
FP16 Compute 8.6 TFLOPs TBD 21.0 TFLOPs 25.2 TFLOPs 25.2 TFLOPs 27.4 TFLOPs
Memory (VRAM) 4 GB HBM1 8 GB HBM2 8 GB HBM2 8 GB HBM2 8 GB HBM2 8 GB HBM2
Memory Bus 4096 bit 2048 bit 2048 bit 2048 bit 2048 bit 2048 bit
Bandwidth 512 GB/s TBD 410 GB/s 484 GB/s 484 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 275W 150W 210W 295W 295W 350W
Price $649 TBD $399
($499 US Actual)
$499
($599 US Actual)
$599 $699
Launch 2015 2018 2017 2017 2017 2017