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Dell G3223Q 32-inch 4K Gaming Monitor Review: Exceptional Color Accuracy And Speed

Tom’s Hardware Verdict

Though the Dell G3223Q doesn’t beat the competition on color volume or contrast, it is one of the quickest 4K 144 Hz monitors I’ve tested. If you place a high priority on gaming performance, give it strong consideration.

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Every so often in the monitor sector, perhaps once a decade, the most popular screen size gets a little bigger. In 2012, when I started reviewing displays for Tom’s Hardware, 27-inch screens were just starting to trickle into the mainstream. 27 was the new 24. Now, it seems the shift is going to 32-inch panels. Will 32 be the new 27? If you look at pricing trends, a 32-inch 4K monitor costs about the same as a 27-inch IPS monitor did ten years ago. And for a couple hundred bucks more, you get 144 Hz and Adaptive-Sync.

I’ve seen several of these very capable gaming displays come through my lab lately with Dell’s  G3223Q being the latest. Like the best 4K gaming monitors in the $800 to $900 tier, it sports 144 Hz over DisplayPort with 120 Hz over HDMI 2.1 for consoles, plus Adaptive-Sync, HDR and a wide color gamut.

Dell G3223Q Specs

Panel Type / Backlight IPS / W-LED, edge array
Screen Size / Aspect Ratio 32 inches / 16:9
Max Resolution & Refresh Rate 3840×2160 @ 144 Hz
FreeSync: 48-144 Hz
G-Sync Compatible
Native Color Depth & Gamut 10-bit (8-bit+FRC) / DCI-P3
HDR10, DisplayHDR 600
Response Time (GTG) 1ms
Brightness (mfr) 400 nits SDR
600 nits HDR
Contrast (mfr) 1,000:1
Speakers None
Video Inputs 1x DisplayPort 1. 4
2x HDMI 2.1
Audio 3.5mm headphone output
USB 3.2 1x up, 2x down
Power Consumption 33.7w, brightness @ 200 nits
Panel Dimensions WxHxD w/base 28.6 x 18.1-22 x 9.7 inches (726 x 460-560 x 246mm)
Panel Thickness 2.7 inches (68mm)
Bezel Width Top/sides: 0.3 inch (7mm)
Bottom: 0.6 inch (16mm)
Weight 20.3 pounds (9.2kg)
Warranty 3 years
  • Dell G3223Q at Dell for $699.99

The G3223Q starts with a speedy IPS panel that responds in a claimed 1ms (gray-to-gray) and runs at 144 Hz over DisplayPort without overclock. FreeSync operates over a 48 to 144 Hz range and G-Sync is also supported, as confirmed by my testing. The G3223Q does not yet appear on Nvidia’s certified list, but I suspect that will happen soon. Minor spoiler alert: This is one of the quickest 32-inch 4K monitors I’ve tested, with excellent performance in the input lag test. Obviously, video processing has been given top priority here.

HDR is supported by a VESA DisplayHDR 600 certification. And in the DisplayHDR 600 picture mode, the panel uses a zone-dimming edge backlight array to increase contrast. I measured 5,270:1, which puts it ahead of monitors that don’t have dynamic contrast but behind other 32-inch 4K screens I’ve tested recently.

There is also plenty of color available, with over 92% coverage of DCI-P3. That’s about average for the category, but similar monitors I’ve reviewed recently managed to exceed 100%. You’ll see those screens in the comparison charts later.

The G3223Q is designed to be versatile, with plenty of picture modes that cover every possible usage. A Creator mode lets you choose between DCI-P3 and sRGB color gamuts and set gamma curves for each. The Console mode is designed for 120 Hz operation of the latest PlayStation and Xbox units. It includes support for Adaptive-Sync and HDR, while allowing the user to tweak color saturation and gamma game-by-game.

The G3223Q looks to be a strong competitor in a field that grows more crowded every week. But the proof is in the testing. Let’s take a look.

Assembly and Accessories

Dell continues its commitment to recyclable packaging, with carefully molded paper pulp inserts that keep the contents secure. My sample arrived in perfect condition. The box opens like a clamshell revealing a stand, base and panel that assemble without tools. An aftermarket arm can be used with the included 100mm VESA mount and fasteners. The accessory bundle features a large external power supply and cables for DisplayPort, HDMI and USB. They have a quality feel with soft, flexible insulation and thicker gauges than what I normally see.

Product 360

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: Dell)

(Image credit: Dell)
(Image credit: Dell)

(Image credit: Dell)

Dell sticks with the minimalist styling theme found on all its gaming monitors. From the front, you see the image with thin flush bezel lines just 7mm wide around the top and sides. A 16mm strip crosses the bottom with a tiny Dell logo front and center. On the lower-right corner, you can just see a power LED, which also marks the spot for the power toggle key. Behind the right side are four control buttons and an OSD joystick. Finishes are a mix of gray and black plastic, all in the same smooth satin texture. Vents ring the sides of the panel, and there are no built-in speakers.

On the back is the G3223Q’s lighting feature. A blue LED strip borders the louvered trapezoidal shape, which you’ll see on the back of many Dell monitors. I’ve compared it to a certain alien robot race from the 1970s TV show Battlestar Galactica, and this version looks no different. Oddly, you cannot turn off the blue LEDs, but you can defeat the power LED, which is barely visible from the front.

The stand is a solid piece that offers firm movements. The height range is 100mm, or just under four inches. You also get 30 degrees of swivel to each side and 5/21 degrees tilt. There is no portrait mode.

The side view shows a panel of typical thickness, around 2.7 inches, with no USB ports in sight. But Dell has made a better effort than most by putting ports underneath the bezel rather than tucked up with the other inputs. There’s a 3.5mm audio jack here too. All three ports are easily accessed from the front. Just feel for them on the left. The USB 3.2 upstream port is on the main input panel under the stand. You also get a single DisplayPort 1.4 and two HDMI 2.1 inputs.

OSD Features

The G3223Q’s OSD is all business, with none of the sci-fi graphics found in many gaming monitors. There are nine sub-menus with all functions right where you’d expect to find them. Press the joystick to bring up the full menu. Pressing one of the four control keys gives access to picture modes, inputs and brightness/contrast.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The G3223Q has 12 total SDR picture modes. Standard is the default and best mode because it is very accurately calibrated at the factory. It’s so good that I was unable to make an improvement in the Custom Color mode like I usually do with Dell screens. But if you want control over gamma, color and RGB gain/bias, Custom Color delivers those options. To change gamuts, choose Creator for either DCI-P3 or sRGB support. Each gamut has its own gamma settings, and you can turn on uniformity compensation, which I did not need for my sample.

The Game menu also offers a few other settings. There are three overdrive levels. Use the slowest one for the best result with no ghosting. A Dark Stabilizer increases black levels for more visible shadow detail. Console mode is specifically for consoles that run at 120 Hz with VRR and HDR. It also has its own set of color and gamma adjustments.

The Display menu has four HDR modes available for that signal type. Desktop provides a good color balance and contrast levels for productivity. DisplayHDR 600 is the best choice for gaming or HDR video. It uses an edge zone dimming feature to increase contrast to a measured 5,270:1. There is no dynamic contrast available for SDR material.

Three of the control keys can be programmed by the user to provide quick access to things like input selection and picture modes. You can turn off the power LED if you wish, but not the blue LED strip light in the back—but at least the rear lights aren’t very bright. I saw only a soft glow against the back wall of my office.

The final menu has signal info and can reset all settings back to their factory defaults.

Dell G3223Q Calibration Settings

The G3223Q comes with a calibration data sheet and is very precisely calibrated before shipping. In the Standard mode, I measured reference level values for grayscale tracking, gamma and color gamut accuracy. There is no need to calibrate the Custom Color mode, though if you wish to do so, it offers gain and bias RGB sliders along with hue and saturation controls for all six colors. However, there are no gamma presets. For those, you’ll have to select Creator mode, where you can change gamma and choose either DCI-P3 or sRGB gamut standards. This mode is also fairly accurate.

For HDR signals, there are four additional modes. Desktop is great for productivity apps and DisplayHDR 600 is the right choice for games and video. Below, I’ve listed the brightness settings for commonly used output levels.

Picture Mode Standard
Brightness 200 nits 76
Brightness 120 nits 39
Brightness 100 nits 28
Brightness 80 nits 17
Brightness 50 nits 5 (min. 34 nits)
Contrast 75

Gaming and Hands-on

I admit a certain bias in favor of 32-inch flat 16:9 monitors given that I use one every day. It is an ideal size for getting work done, especially if you write or edit graphics. The G3223Q is very versatile in this regard. It delivers plenty of color to your favorite apps. Though SDR content is most accurately matched to the sRGB gamut, today’s wide gamut screens have largely erased that guideline. The G3223Q offers a very usable Creator mode, so sRGB is available with just a few clicks of the OSD joystick.

For all my work, I stuck with the Standard picture mode, brightness set to 76%, which equated to 200 nits. Though contrast is just IPS-average, I enjoyed a sharp and punchy image that was rich in detail. Pixel density is sufficient for precise photo editing, and videos render clearly and smoothly.

HDR gaming is the G3223Q’s forte, so I turned first to Doom Eternal. I did not have to make any changes to levels or color in the game’s menu to get a stunning HDR image. It wasn’t quite on the level of a full-array backlight screen, but it was much better than the SDR version of the same scenes. Color was vivid and bright, thanks to accurate saturation tracking, and full of fine detail. There’s nothing quite like studying game environments in 4K on a big monitor.

Video processing presented no issues with perfect FreeSync and G-Sync operation at around 120fps. That was the highest I could go when using a PC equipped with a GeForce RTX 3090. A Radeon RX 5700 XT delivered around 100fps. Both machines were satisfying to play given my moderate skills. If you are more competent, you will want to consider a faster monitor running at 240 Hz or more.

Tomb Raider made the most of the G3223Q’s large color gamut. Though a few hues looked over-saturated in this SDR game, the overall image was very strong with good black levels and plenty of color detail. It would have been nice to have a dynamic contrast option available in SDR mode, but the image was sharp and colorful.

The G3223Q has no backlight strobe option, but its overdrive is effective when left on its lowest setting, Fast. Super Fast and Extreme caused visible and distracting ghost artifacts in both test patterns and actual content. Ultimately, the only thing that will be smoother and have greater motion resolution than this display is a faster panel. Control lag was perceptibly non-existent, as in, there was none I could detect. This is one of the fastest 4K displays I’ve tested to date.

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Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom’s Hardware US. He’s a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.

How to Choose the Best HDR Monitor: Make Your Upgrade Worth It

How do you pick the best HDR monitor?  (Image credit: Ruslan Ivantsov/Shutterstock)

For gamers, movie-watchers or creative professionals, monitors that support high dynamic range (HDR) content are the next step toward a more lifelike display. When you play a familiar game or movie in HDR for the first time, you’ll likely notice more colors and detail, such as brighter highlights and deeper shadows, than what you were able to see on your regular standard dynamic range (SDR) display.  

But there are many misconceptions around HDR, its benefits, who needs an HDR display and what makes a good HDR display for PCs. After you read this guide, you’ll be able to decide if you actually want an HDR monitor and how to pick the best one for your rig so you’ll actually notice the difference between SDR and HDR. 

Quick Tips

When picking an HDR monitor, these should be your top considerations: 

  • Brighter is better. HDR monitors can get much brighter than SDR ones. If you’re a general user, opt for a monitor that’s VESA-certified for at least DisplayHDR 500 (a minimum max brightness of 500 nits with HDR media), while gamers will probably want DisplayHDR 600 or greater. Creative professionals like video editors should get at least DisplayHDR 1000. 
  • Backlight dimming type is crucial. FALD > edge-lit dimming > global dimming. If you go for DisplayHDR 500 or higher, you’ll know you have at least edge-lit dimming. And when it comes to FALD (full-array local dimming) or edge-lit dimming, more zones are better 
  • The more DCI-P3 coverage, the better. Shoot for at least 85%. But you’ll also want to check our reviews for color accuracy.  
  • As usual, higher contrast ratios are best. High contrast is an area where HDR displays shine over their SDR counterparts. 
  • HDR10 is the only HDR format Windows users need unless they plan to hook their display up to something like a Blu-ray player. 
  • Gamers should still prioritize things like refresh rate, response time and the Nvidia G-Sync or AMD FreeSync range. 

Best HDR Monitors

If you’re already prepared to buy an HDR monitor, we’ve highlighted our top recommendations below.    

Acer Predator X35

If you want something bigger than those two 27-inchers above, the Acer Predator X35 also uses a FALD backlight that boasts 512 zones. Our Acer Predator X35 review found the 35-inch monitor to deliver impeccable HDR with DisplayHDR 1000 certification and contrast levels only bested by pricey OLED and mini-LED displays. It’s one of the best gaming monitors currently available and bosts a 180 Hz refresh rate that’s overclockable to 200 Hz and G-Sync.  

Acer Predator X35

Alienware AW5520QF

OLED HDR displays are great at fighting the halo effect, according to VESA, and the 55-inch Alienware AW5520QF effectively has over 8 million dimming ‘zones.’ It can only hit 400 nits brightness with HDR, making it best in darker rooms, but its theoretically infinite contrast meant HDR content looked stunning in our Alienware AW5520QF review . This is a display for gamers, boasting 4K resolution at a 120 Hz refresh rate and AMD FreeSync with an lower-than-low 0.5ms response time. 

Alienware AW5520QF

Asus ProArt PA32UCX

The Asus ProArt PA32UCX is one of the best HDR monitors for creative professionals. With a mini-LED panel, it’s able to pack an impressive 1,152 FALD zones in its 32-inch, 4K screen. It also includes DisplayHDR 1000 ceritifcation, plus HLG and is Dolby Vision, a rarity in PC monitors. In our Asus ProArt PA32UCX review , we praised its color accuracy that makes it a reference display fit for studio production. 

 Asus ProArt PA32UCX 

Apple Pro Display XDR

The Apple Pro Display XDR is the best HDR monitor for Mac users. According to VESA, it’s one of the best HDR monitors it’s tested for avoiding the halo effect (along with the Asus ROG Swift PG27UQ mentioned above). It also uses a FALD backlight, this time packing 576 zones. The 32-inch monitor features a mind-blowing 6K resolution (6016 x 3384) and is also specced to hit up to 1,600 nits max brightness, making it a great fit for video editing. Bonuses include support for Dolby Vision and HLG in addition to HDR10. Just don’t forget the stand will cost you an extra $999.  

 Apple Pro Display XDR  

What’s Does HDR Actually Mean?  

Images on the best HDR monitors look noticeably different than on SDR ones.  (Image credit: ViewSonic)

We’ve already done an in-depth breakdown of the meaning of HDR, but here’s a quick rundown.

HDR content looks different from SDR content when viewed on an HDR display, and a large part of that is due to how much brighter HDR displays can get. While the best SDR monitors typically max out at around 300 nits brightness, HDR monitors can get much brighter, which means what you see is closer to the massive dynamic range (a cloud can appear to be 10,000 nits, for example) that we see in real life. In fact, how bright an HDR monitor can get and how it gets there should be your first priority when buying an HDR monitor (more on that later). 

That’s not all. HDR monitors also have a wider range of colors available. A display’s color gamut tells you the range of colors it can produce. Ideally, this range would cover every shade the human eye is able to see, but we’re not there yet. SDR displays use the sRGB color space, which covers approximately one-third of the colors we can see in real life, according to VESA, a non-profit group with membership from hundreds of corporations (like Dell, LG, Sony, Intel and AMD) that creates open standards for displays. HDR displays use the DCI-P3 color space, which covers closer to 50% of the colors we can see. 

The best HDR monitors have a wide, accurate color gamut.  (Image credit: BenQ)

The DCI-P3 color space, named by the Digital Cinemas Initiative (DCI), is used by the U.S. film industry, so you can expect many movies viewed in HDR on an HDR display to look closer to how their creators intended and more colorful than it would on a regular display. 

HDR vs. 4K  

It’s important to understand the difference between HDR and 4K.  (Image credit: Shutterstock)

Comparing HDR to 4K is like comparing apples to oranges. As just described, the primary benefits of HDR are greater brightness and color capabilities. 4K (also known as UHD), on the other hand, is a resolution, so it tells you how many pixels a display has in width x height format. The more pixels you have, the sharper the image; a 4K monitor has a resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels and will look sharper than a 2K / QHD / 1440p display (2560  x 1440). But that has zero implications regarding brightness or colors. 

That said, the sharpness of a 4K display combined with the abilities of HDR support are a powerful combination, and you’ll find many a Blu-ray offering both 4K and HDR.

What Do I Need to Enjoy HDR? 

If you’re a creative professional, like a video or photo editor, your need for HDR is clear. But general users and gamers should make sure they have a use for HDR and everything required to enjoy it. 

To get the image quality gains HDR offers, you must play HDR content using an HDR display and hardware, such as a PC, that supports HDR. There are PC games available in HDR and even PlayStation 4 games and Xbox One games . Some streaming services, like Netflix , let you stream content in HDR. And, of course, there are plenty of HDR Blu-rays. 

You can connect an HDR display to an HDR Blu-ray player, gaming console or streaming box or you can play all this content off a PC. For Windows, you need a PC with an Intel 7th Generation Core CPU or later with HD 620 integrated graphics. Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 10-series and newer also support HDR, as does AMD’s Radeon RX Vega integrated graphics and Radeon RX 5000-series and newer graphics cards. 

You’ll also need to connect the monitor via either:

  • USB-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode 
  • Thunderbolt 3 or 4 USB-C port
  • HDMI 2.0a or 2.1 port 
  • DisplayPort 1.4 or later

For help selecting which port to use for connecting your HDR display, check out our DisplayPort vs. HDMI analysis. 

Meanwhile, Apple macOS users require the latest version of their respective OS and an Apple product that supports HDR. You can find a list of Mac models supporting HDR here . These systems can play HDR either on their integrated screen or via a Thunderbolt 3 USB-C port.

HDR Monitor Brightness 

The max brightness of a monitor and how its backlight works should be your top priority when considering an HDR display — the brighter the better. Remember: the focus here is mimicking real life as closely as possible, and the range of what humans see, like the sun, can extend dramatically, over 1,000,000 nits (depending on atmospheric conditions), according to Roland Wooster, the chairman of VESA’s DisplayHDR and Intel principal engineer and display and platform technologist at the Client Architecture and Innovation Group.

For HDR monitor shoppers, the key work VESA, (which also makes standards for DisplayPort and monitor mounts ) does is its DisplayHDR certifications. Many HDR monitors boast these specs, which revolve around the monitor’s minimum maximum brightness level with HDR content, in their spec sheets. We recommend opting for an HDR monitor with one of these certifications — and beware of monitors that claim a “HDR400” spec, for example, instead of “DisplayHDR 400,” as VESA hasn’t tested these. 

Spec Name Minimum Max Brightness Range of Color Gamut Minimum Color Gamut Typical Backlight Dimming Technology
DisplayHDR 400 400 nits sRGB 95% sRGB Screen-level
DisplayHDR 500 500 nits Wide color gamut 99% sRGB and 90% DCI-P3 Zone-level
DisplayHDR 600 600 nits Wide color gamut 99% sRGB and 90% DCI-P3 Zone-level
DisplayHDR 1000 1,000 nits Wide color gamut 99% sRGB and 90% DCI-P3 Zone-level
DisplayHDR 1400 1,400 nits Wide color gamut 99% sRGB and 95% DCI-P3 Zone-level

If you can afford it, DisplayHDR 1000 or greater is definitely the way to go, and if you’re a video editor, this is pretty much a hard requirement, Wooster says.  

For more on HDR, check out our interview with Wooster on The Tom’s Hardware Show . 

But what about the lower levels of DisplayHDR? For general users and gamers, a monitor that’s DisplayHDR 600 or 500-certified is still capable of providing a noticeable difference over an SDR monitor, and that’s because VESA’s DisplayHDR specs also provide information about another crucial characteristic of an HDR monitor: backlight dimming technology.

HDR Backlight Dimming 

Backlight dimming technology, which is how a monitor adjusts its brightness, has a great impact on your monitor’s contrast ratio and, thus, your HDR experience. In our HDR monitor reviews , we always tell you what type of backlight dimming technology the unit uses in the first line of the specs table. 

For an LCD monitor, ideally, you want a type of local dimming — FALD or edge-lit (also called edge array) — over global dimming. These panels work with individually controllable ‘zones,’ that let the display simultaneously output different levels of brightness on different parts of the screen.

But why would you want this? Because there are situations where you want your monitor to be its brightest in some parts of the image and not others. 

“Let’s say you’re playing a game, and there’s a gun fired and you see the explosion coming out of the barrel of the gun. That’s not something that fills the screen; that’s a small patch of a screen.” VESA’s Wooster explained. “If you have a display that can’t offer to you full luminance unless it’s full-screen, you’re not going to be able to render that bright area in just a smaller part of the screen.”   

Sure, 1,000 nits brightness is great, but without any local dimming capabilities, your black levels are also high (the lower, the better with black levels). Blacks will look light gray, and the actual dynamic contrast ratio of the monitor will be no better than before, according to Wooster. 

“By having local dimming, you can reduce the backlight power and you can have this wonderful dynamic range of super bright patches in some areas, then very dark blacks in other parts of the image,” he said.

Full-array Local Dimming (FALD) 

Opt for a FALD HDR monitor if you can afford it.  (Image credit: VESA)

Full-array local dimming (FALD) is the best backlight dimming technology. These monitors typically have 384, 512 or 1,152 zones, (such as the mini-LED Asus ProArt PA32UCX ). The image above shows a FALD panel with hundreds of zones, allowing for a varying brightness across hundreds of different areas of the panel simultaneously. 

But FALD HDR monitors are the most expensive type, and, generally speaking, the more zones the pricier. For example, the Asus ROG Swift PG27UQ (384 zones, $1,270 at the time of writing), Acer Predator X35 (512 zones, $2,000) are both HDR displays with FALD backlights (and two of the best gaming monitors too).

Edge-lit Dimming 

Edge-lit monitors are also a good option for HDR.  (Image credit: VESA)

If that’s too rich for your blood, you can opt for edge-lit or edge array local dimming, which has its zones on one edge of the panel. These monitors will have fewer zones than FALD ones, typically 8, 16 or 32. As you can see in the picture above, this panel’s ability to display different brightness levels is more limited than a FALD one. 

Global Dimming 

The least impactful type of HDR backlight dimming is global dimming. Here, the panel only has one dimming zone. According to VESA, this type of dimming is suitable for scenes with a limited dynamic range, but the contrast ratio typically never surpasses 1,000:1, which is comparable to some good SDR monitors.  

OLED

Unlike LCD monitors, OLED panels, which are also quite expensive, don’t use a backlight. Instead, each pixel makes its own light and is, therefore, like a zone in its own regard. The downside to using an OLED monitor with HDR is that these displays can’t get as bright as their LCD counterparts, often maxing out at 500 nits. The Alienware AW5520QF OLED gaming monitor, for example, only goes up to 400 nits. 

But OLED is also known for providing extraordinary contrast. You also won’t have to worry about the halo effect (more on that in the dedicated section below) with OLED. Gamers should weigh the pros and cons of OLED and LED, and your choice may depend on the environment you typically game in (if you usually play in dark rooms, less luminance may not be a big deal). If you’re a professional picking between the two, Wooster generally recommends OLED for photo editing and an LCD HDR display for video editing, where you should aim for 1,000 nits.  

Is DisplayHDR 400, 500 or 600 Worth It? 

We’ve heard a lot of tech enthusiasts argue that an HDR monitor is virtually useless unless it can hit 1,000 nits brightness. And we agree that 1,000 nits is ideal (and crucial if you’re doing video editing), but general users and gamers can get by with a DisplayHDR 500 or 600-certified monitor, because those specs also include that all-important local (FALD or edge-lit) backlight dimming we discussed above. 

According to VESA’s Wooster, the DisplayHDR 500 and 600 specs, while not as amazing a jump from SDR as DisplayHDR 1000, can still yield a noticeable improvement over SDR because those specs require local dimming to meet the specs’ contrast requirements. He said that DisplayHDR 500 or 600 monitors will still have a “dramatically and very visibly better” result than an SDR display; however, he recommended that gamers go for DisplayHDR 600 or greater. 

“If you don’t have the budget for a 1,000-nit display but you do for DisplayHDR 600, it will give you a good experience,” Wooster said. “DisplayHDR 600 still has local dimming and the same color characteristics as the DisplayHDR 1000 spec, and it’s going to give you a result dramatically different than what you’re used to on an SDR display,” Wooster said. 

The story gets less appealing with DisplayHDR 400, however, since that spec does not require local dimming. Wooster said the amount of improvement you’d see from an SDR monitor to a DisplayHDR 400-certified one will depend on how good of an SDR monitor you’re used to. 

“If you took an average mainstream monitor that might only be 270 nits, fairly deficient in color, may not have a particularly high-contrast panel, you could see that when you go the DisplayHDR 400 tier that you may have 20% more color, 50% more contrast and also active dimming,” he said, referring to the ability to dim based on real-time analysis of the content instead of just when metadata changes. “So in scenarios where all of the screen goes dark in a movie, for example, you will gain active dimming HDR benefits as well.” 

But Wooster noted that the difference between HDR and SDR “isn’t going to be nearly as big” with DisplayHDR 400 compared to if you went up to DisplayHDR 500.

What About the Halo Effect? 

The halo effect is something encountered with HDR monitors using a local dimming system, such as FALD or edge-array, and happens when one zone is brighter than the adjacent one and causes a glow bleeding into that adjacent segment. 

Unfortunately, there’s isn’t a spec right now that’ll help you determine if an HDR monitor you’re thinking of buying may be a culprit of the halo effect.

If you want to avoid this, you can opt for an expensive OLED monitor, (which doesn’t use any backlight). Wooster also recommended the Asus ROG Swift PG27UQ and Apple Pro Display XDR , which “have a unique and special film in the polarizer stack and achieve nearly identical levels of halo reduction. ” 

HDR Color 

After brightness and backlight type, color accuracy is the next most important factor for choosing an HDR display. As discussed, with DCI-P3 as their native color gamut, HDR displays are able to produce a wider range of colors than SDR’s sRGB color space. But you need more than just a wide-color space; you also want content to look the way its creators intended, and for that, you need a color-accurate HDR monitor. Our monitor reviews (HDR or otherwise) always feature extensive testing around color accuracy. 

Long story short: Windows for a long time used the sRGB color space, but since HDR came onto the scene, Microsoft switched the color model to BT.2020, which is almost twice the size of sRGB, according to Wooster. 

“Everything we’ve done for the last 25 years or so [was] limited to that and by moving to HDR and adopting the BT2020 color space, we’re now able to ultimately get displays up to approximately 70% of the color range we can see,” he said.  

While 100% sRGB coverage is good for Windows apps, you’ll want more colors for HDR content. The key color space here is DCI-P3, a subset of BT2020 (targeting the central triangle) used in the film industry. 

“Although all of the data from Windows and movies and all HDR content is communicated in a BT 2020 format, the vast majority of applications and content doesn’t use the full color spectrum yet but rather uses a subset encapsulated within DCI-P3,” Wooster explained. 

DCI-P3 covers a wider range of colors than sRGB.  (Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

When perusing a display’s spec sheet, look for as close to 100% DCI-P3 color coverage as possible. Still, Wooster said that for games where all of the colors are artificial this may not matter as much. But if you want your colors to pack a punch, you’ll want high DCI-P3 coverage and accuracy, and both become critical if you’re a content creator.

Resolution

The next thing to keep in mind is your monitor’s resolution, or how many pixels it has in width x length format. Naturally, a 4K (3840 x 2160) monitor will generally cost more than a similarly specced monitor at 1440p (aka QHD) or 1080p (FHD) resolution. The higher the resolution, the sharper the image (assuming you have content in that resolution as well). 

4K / UHD 3840 x 2160
1440p / QHD 2560 x 1440
1080p / FHD 1920 x 10810

But outside of budget, there are other things to consider before picking a resolution.

Gamers should think of the graphics card prowess they’ll need to push frames at anything over 1080p. Taking advantage of a 4K gaming display (check our our Best 4K Gaming Monitors list for recommendations) at a speedy refresh rate of 144 Hz will require a more powerful graphics card than running a game at 60 frames per second (fps) at 1080p, for example. 

You should also consider how close you’ll be sitting to your HDR monitor and how good your eyesight is. If you plan on sitting pretty close to your monitor and want one that’s 27 inches or larger, you may want to go up to 4K. If you go smaller than 27 inches, the visible benefit of going up to 4K becomes more debatable.

“There may be a better use for your budget in getting higher brightness HDR, a higher quality screen or greater color gamut then potentially chasing a resolution that you may not be able to see,” Wooster said in relation to these smaller monitors.

HDR10 vs. HDR10+ vs. Dolby Vision vs. Hybrid Log Gamma 

For an HDR display to work with a Windows PC, it must support the HDR10 protocol. There are three other HDR protocols — HDR10+, Dolby Vision and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) — but HDR10 is the only one Windows PCs support. 

HDR10+ is a proprietary protocol from Samsung promising “even better and brighter colors” than HDR10. You can find this HDR10+ content on Amazon Prime Video, but if you use a Windows PC to access it, your PC will just convert it to regular HDR10 anyway.  

Dolby Vision is another HDR protocol you’ll find on TVs mostly. The Asus ProArt PA32UCX , Asus ProArt PQ22UC portable monitor and Apple Pro Display XDR are currently the only PC monitors with Dolby Vision. It’s different from HDR10 in its approach to tone mapping. Instead of applying a generic map, it tone-maps to each individual display, and this information is in the content’s metadata. The result is use of the display’s full dynamic range. HDR10 is mastered to a fixed peak level and won’t look the same on every monitor. When we watched a movie on HDR10 and then in Dolby Vision, the latter experience showed noticeably more detail, such as dark objects against bright, white backgrounds and textures. Colors also seemed more powerful. However, it’s harder to find Dolby Vision content. 

Finally, HLG comes from the BBC and Japanese broadcaster NHK and “was specially developed for television,” so if you plan on streaming BBC content you may want to look for a TV or one of the rare PC monitors with HLG support, (such as Asus’ ProArt PA32UCX). But, again, if you stream this off a browser in Windows, your PC will just convert it to HDR10. 

The only HDR formats available for Apple macOS users are HDR10 and Dolby Vision (see supporting devices in the What Do I Need to Enjoy HDR section). 

HDR support can greatly improve the experience of a PC monitor if you have the right type of content and buy a display with the proper specs and features that will lead to a marked improvement in image quality over an SDR monitor. That’s how you make graduating to HDR worth your investment. 

But there’s also the debate of monitors versus TVs. HDR TVs tend to be more affordable than HDR monitors. In that case, you’d still be looking for the same capabilities as you would with an HDR monitor. However, keep in mind that just like when buying an SDR TV as a display for your system, you’ll have to with deal with cons like lower refresh rates, greater input lag and, likely, a smaller variety of ports, such as DisplayPort.  

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: Best 4K Gaming Monitors

MORE: HDMI vs. DisplayPort: Which Is Better For Gaming?

MORE: All Monitor Content

Scharon Harding has a special affinity for gaming peripherals (especially monitors), laptops and virtual reality. Previously, she covered business technology, including hardware, software, cyber security, cloud and other IT happenings, at Channelnomics, with bylines at CRN UK.

Samsung UR59C 4K Curved Monitor Review: Premium Image, Budget Price — Tom’s Hardware

Tom’s Hardware Verdict

The Samsung UR59C leaves out a few features to achieve its budget 4K price. But it makes up for that with stunning image quality and solid gameplay when driven by a fast graphics card.

Today’s best Samsung UR59C deals

$349.99

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$349. 99

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$555

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Features and Specifications

Update November 26, 2019: The Samsung UR59C is currently one of our Best 4K Gaming Monitors for those seeking a curved display. It recently got a price drop from $500 and is currently selling for around $450

Original review August 6, 2019: 

Just five years ago Sharp launched one of the first UHD/4K monitors, the 32-inch PN-K321 at the lofty price of $3,000. It wasn’t long before cheaper alternatives appeared, but they relied on 28-inch TN panels to keep prices closer to $600.

Today, it’s not difficult to find 32-inch 4K resolution monitors for under $1,000 (see our Best Budget 4K Monitors list). Our favorite for all-around use is the BenQ PD3200U, which we reviewed in 2017. That screen is a good deal at $700 at the time of writing, but what if you could put a 32-inch UHD curved monitor on your desk for under $500? Well, you can with the Samsung UR59C, which makes our Best Computer Monitors list. 

(Image credit: Samsung))

  • Samsung UR59C at Amazon for $555

Samsung UR59C 4K Monitor Specs

Panel Type & Backlight VA / W-LED, edge array
Screen Size, Aspect Ratio & Curve Radius 32 inches / 16:9, Curve radius: 1500mm
Max Resolution & Refresh Rate 3840 x 2160 @ 60Hz, Pixel Density: 139ppi
Native Color Depth & Gamut 10-bit / sRGB
Response Time (GTG) 4ms
Brightness 250 nits
Contrast 2,500:1
Speakers
Video Inputs 1x DisplayPort 1. 2, 1x HDMI 2.0
Audio 1x 3.5mm output
USB
Power Consumption 30w, brightness @ 200 nits
Panel Dimensions(WxHxD with base) 28.1 x 20.3 x 9.4 inches / 714 x 516 x 239mm
Panel Thickness 3.4 inches / 86mm
Bezel Width Top/sides: 0.4 inch / 9mm, Bottom: 0.8 inch / 20mm
Weight 12.3 pounds / 5.6kg
Warranty 3 years

The UR59C (you may also see it listed as the U32R59C) is a curved, 16:9 VA monitor with an active area of 31.5 inches and 3840 x 2160 resolution for a pixel density of 139 pixels per inch. VA means high contrast, and the UR59C doesn’t disappoint with a dynamic range of over 2,500:1. Color is in the sRGB realm, where Samsung claims a volume of 103%.

The refresh rate unfortunately maxes out at 60 Hz, and there is no adaptive sync, (like FreeSync or G-Sync). That’s a bit of a bummer for gamers, but to be fair, Samsung doesn’t market the UR59C as a gaming monitor. To its credit, it has a snappy 4ms response time, and our tests showed it to have lower input lag than most other 60 Hz UHD monitors we’ve tested.

Unpacking and Accessories

The base and upright must be assembled with a captive bolt, then the panel is attached using a Phillips-head screwdriver. The power supply is external, but rather than the usual brick, you get a large wall-wart, which is narrow enough not to impede other plugs on a power strip. The only other cable is an HDMI. There are no USB ports, hence, no  more cables.

Product 360

Image 1 of 5

The UR59C is simple and understated while being distinctly Samsung. Its 1500mm curve radius sounds tight on paper, but since it’s not an ultra-wide, the curve seems less extreme in person. There’s no image distortion, and the curve is quite natural, bringing in the sides of the screen in a natural way and just enough to keep the entire desktop within your peripheral vision if sitting about 3 feet away.

The picture is crystal clear, thanks to an excellent anti-glare layer keeping reflections out of the way. A thin bezel surrounds the top and sides with a wider band across the bottom. Control is accomplished by a joystick found around the back-right side. It toggles the power and navigates the on-screen display (OSD) easily and intuitively.

Some of the savings seem to come from the stand, which is a minimalist affair. While extremely solid, it’s also very light and spindly. With no vertical or swivel movements, the only adjustments are 17 degrees back tilt and 2 degrees forward. The stand’s fulcrum is down low, so tilting the panel moves the top away from you.There is no VESA mount, meaning you’re stuck with the factory stand.

The side profile is about as thin as a curved monitor can get. Around back, you’ll find a textured plastic surface unbroken by angles or vent holes. Heat is a non-factor; you can expect cool running from the UR59C.

The input panel is hidden under the circular snap-on cover, and you can fish the cables down the hollow upright for a super-clean look. The photo shows a Mini DisplayPort input, but our sample came with a standard-size port, version 1.2. HDMI is version 2.0, so it works at the monitor’s full native resolution. There are no built-in speakers, but there is a headphone jack, plus volume control in the OSD.

OSD Features

To call up the OSD, press the joystick, click up and press again. You can also adjust picture-in-picture (PIP) and source without going into the full menu. The feature set is appropriate for a monitor of this type with a three-level overdrive, game mode and all the necessary controls for calibration.

Samsung calls its picture modes Magic Bright, and the UR59C has four. Custom is the default setting and the best starting point for calibration. Yes, you will want to make some adjustments because at the factory settings we saw some loss of detail in the image’s darkest and brightest areas. Color looked good out of the box, but a high-contrast VA panel can deliver lots of detail and dynamic range when properly set up.

If you prefer to use a low blue light mode to help reduce eye fatigue, that setting, dubbed Eye Saver, is available in the second half of the Picture menu. It warms the color temp and reduces brightness.

There is also a Game Mode, which alters color to help sharpen the picture. It works as promised, but afterward some colors looked unnatural. Instead, we recommend dialing in a few changes to the RGB sliders, gamma presets and HDMI black level. We’ll show you which ones below.

There is also a Game Mode, which alters color to help sharpen the picture. It works as promised, but made some colors looked unnatural. Instead, we recommend dialing in a few changes to the RGB sliders, gamma presets and HDMI black level. We’ll show you which ones below.

If you want to view two sources at once, you can choose between PIP and picture-by-picture (PBP). Contrast is independently adjustable in the two windows, and you can pick which one sends the headphone jack audio.

Setup and Calibration

The biggest issue we noticed when powering up the UR59C was its gamma curve. Initial measurements showed it to be skewed such that fine highlight and shadow detail were hard to see.

At minimum, we suggest changing HDMI Black Level to Normal and selecting the Gamma Mode 2 preset. If you want to take it further, try our RGB settings below. Once dialed in, this monitor is extremely accurate—as in professional-grade—in all metrics.

 Here are the values we used during testing:

Samsung UR59C 4K Curved Calibration Settings
Magic Bright Custom
Brightness 200 nits 50
Brightness 120 nits 23
Brightness 100 nits 19
Brightness 80 nits 15
Brightness 50 nits 8
Contrast 72
Gamma Mode 2
HDMI Black Level Normal
Color Temp User Red 49, Green 53, Blue 48

Gaming and Hands-on

Many users have asked why curved 16:9 monitors exist. Based on past observations, we’ve asked the same. They don’t offer enough curve to really create a wraparound effect, at least not in the way an ultra-wide screen does. But the UR59C manages to pull off something new. Thanks to its 1500R radius, the curve makes a visible difference and provides significant benefits.

A 32-inch monitor is big, no doubt, and at typical desktop viewing distances, a flat panel has users placing their windows in the center with less-important elements relegated to the sides. I’m writing this article on a flat 32-inch screen, and though I have several windows open, only the center one (Microsoft Word) is able to win my attention. When I try the same thing on the UR59C, I can leave message windows open to the sides, and their content remains on my visual radar. It’s a subtle effect but a palpable one nonetheless.

The UR59C’s clarity is first-rate, due to high pixel density and high contrast. The benefits of wide dynamic range cannot be understated—everything looks better. Color is bolder, photos and videos are clearer and black text on a white background is easier to read. If color accuracy is a priority for you, this monitor won’t disappoint. Image fidelity is among the best we’ve seen.

We approached gaming with some skepticism. After playing on so many high-speed FreeSync and G-Sync monitors, we wondered how it would be going back to a plain ol’ 60 Hz screen. With a PC using an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti FE graphics card, the experience exceeded expectations. In Tomb Raider, we found the best result by setting V-Sync to its triple buffer mode. There was no discernable input lag, and screen tears were eliminated. Turning it off produced the expected tears, though a constant 60 frames per second (fps) rate kept the action from bogging down or stuttering. The UR59C’s overdrive worked well on its fastest setting. It kept motion blur to a minimum, and we never saw any ghosting or object trails.

The Samsung’s high contrast made Call of Duty: WWII a real pleasure. Cut scenes looked like a live-action movie, no doubt because of the 4K resolution and superb color. Though we are fans of speedy, low resolution monitors like the Gigabyte Aorus KD25F (240 Hz, 1080p resolution), there’s something to be said about high pixel density and contrast. Like our Windows experience, everything in the game just looked better. Trees and grass were more realistic, rocks were rockier, dirt was dirtier and reflections from shiny objects really created a sense of depth. No IPS or TN screen can duplicate this kind of image quality and realism.

It’s hard to admit it, but we didn’t miss adaptive sync. The takeaway from that is if your video card is fast enough, it’s not absolutely necessary. Since our framerates stayed solidly at 60 fps, the UR59C’s quick response made input lag and blur a non-issue. Though not strictly a gaming monitor, we think most players will be satisfied with the experience it delivers.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

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Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom’s Hardware US. He’s a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.

The 4 Best 4k Gaming Monitors — Fall 2022: Reviews

  1. Table of Contents
  2. Intro
  3. Best Monitor

    1. Best Upper Mid-Range

      1. Best Mid-Range

        1. Best Budget

          1. Notable Mentions
          2. Recent Updates
          3. All Reviews
          4. Discussions

          Updated Sep 29, 2022 at 12:32 pm

          By Nicholas Di Giovanni

          Gaming has evolved in recent years, with new 4k monitors delivering a more detailed gaming experience. Console and PC gamers alike have embraced this new format, with upgraded consoles that can take advantage of the greater levels of detail these screens provide. More 4k monitors are starting to include HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, allowing you to reach a higher frame rate for a better gaming experience, and high-refresh-rate 4k monitors are becoming more accessible and affordable to the consumer market.

          We’ve bought and tested more than 250 monitors, and below are our picks for the best 4k gaming monitors to buy. Also, see our recommendations for the best monitors for Xbox Series X, the best monitors for PS5, and the best 4k 144Hz monitors.

          1. Best 4k Gaming Monitor

            Samsung LS32BG852NNXGO

            Unavailable

            Amazon.de

            Unavailable

            Missing store

            Gaming

            9.0

            Size

            32″

            Resolution

            3840×2160

            Pixel Type

            VA

            Variable Refresh Rate

            Yes

            HDR10

            Yes

            Max Refresh Rate

            240Hz

            See all our test results

            The best 4k gaming monitor we’ve tested is the Samsung LS32BG852NNXGO. It’s a fantastic gaming monitor that’s future-proof because it’s the first 4k, 240Hz monitor available to the consumer market. While you can’t hit the max refresh rate with a 4k resolution now, you at least won’t have to worry about buying another monitor when technology starts to support it. In terms of its gaming performance, motion looks incredible thanks to its very fast response time, and it has low input lag for a responsive feel. It also has native FreeSync variable refresh rate (VRR) support and G-SYNC compatibility to reduce screen tearing. There are some flicker issues with VRR enabled with low frame rates, but it’s only with dark scenes and hard to see with most content.

            Another advantage of this monitor is the excellent picture quality. It uses Mini LED backlighting to produce a decent local dimming feature, and combined with its high native contrast, it displays deep blacks with minimal blooming, but there’s still some black crush. It makes it a good choice for HDR gaming as some colors look vivid, highlights pop, and it displays a wide range of colors.

            See our review

          2. Best Upper Mid-Range 4k Gaming Monitor

            LG 32GQ950-B

            SEE PRICE

            Amazon.de

            Unavailable

            Missing store

            Gaming

            8.8

            Size

            32″

            Resolution

            3840×2160

            Pixel Type

            IPS

            Variable Refresh Rate

            Yes

            HDR10

            Yes

            Max Refresh Rate

            160Hz

            See all our test results

            If you find the Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 S32BG85 too expensive and you won’t take advantage of all its features, look into an upper mid-range model like the LG 32GQ950-B. It’s still an excellent gaming monitor, with the main difference being that it has a lower 160Hz max refresh rate and its picture quality isn’t as good because it lacks Mini LED backlighting, and its local dimming feature is worse than on the Samsung, but that’s the trade-off you have to make for a cheaper monitor. However, you can still take full advantage of any HDMI 2.1 device like the PS5 or Xbox Series X as it supports the full bandwidth of HDMI 2.1, and if you use a DisplayPort connection, you can also reach its max refresh rate of 160Hz with a 4k resolution.

            Its fast response time over its entire refresh rate range results in smooth motion handling. Even though it doesn’t have an optional backlight strobing feature to reduce persistence blur, you likely won’t need one anyways, especially for high-frame-rate gaming. Like the Samsung monitor, it natively supports FreeSync VRR, and it’s also G-SYNC compatible to reduce screen tearing if you have an NVIDIA graphics card.

            See our review

          3. Best Mid-Range 4k Gaming Monitor

            Gigabyte M32U

            SEE PRICE

            Amazon. de

            Unavailable

            Missing store

            Gaming

            8.6

            Size

            32″

            Resolution

            3840×2160

            Pixel Type

            IPS

            HDR10

            Yes

            Variable Refresh Rate

            Yes

            Max Refresh Rate

            144Hz

            See all our test results

            If you need a simpler 4k gaming monitor in the mid-range price category, then the Gigabyte M32U is a good alternative to the LG 32GQ950-B. It has many of the same features, but one big difference is that the Gigabyte supports 24 Gbps of HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, while the LG has 48 Gbps bandwidth. It doesn’t make a difference for gaming on the Xbox Series X or PS5, but your graphics card will need to use compression to achieve high-frame-rate signals in 4k, but you still won’t have issues playing games.

            Like the LG, it has a quick response time, low input lag, and VRR support for a responsive gaming experience. It also has a few extra features like a frame rate counter and a dashboard that shows all the vital information from your PC, like the CPU and GPU temps, memory, and other helpful information. There are also similar monitors from Gigabyte that don’t cost much, like the Gigabyte M28U, which is essentially the same monitor, but with a smaller screen. If you tend to game in a dark room, then the Gigabyte M32UC is a good alternative as it has a higher contrast, but the M32U still has better motion handling.

            See our review

          4. Best Budget 4k Gaming Monitor

            Dell S2721QS

            SEE PRICE

            Amazon. de

            Unavailable

            Missing store

            Gaming

            7.1

            Size

            27″

            Resolution

            3840×2160

            Pixel Type

            IPS

            HDR10

            Yes

            Variable Refresh Rate

            Yes

            Max Refresh Rate

            60Hz

            See all our test results

            Most 4k gaming monitors tend to cost more than regular 4k monitors, so if you want one, you’ll have to be prepared to spend some money. However, if you’re on a tight budget and want a basic 4k monitor for console gaming, you can get something like the Dell S2721QS. Although it’s designed for the office, it still provides decent gaming performance at a low cost, and it’s good enough for playing 4k games up to 60 fps from the PS5 or Xbox Series X. However, because it doesn’t support HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, you can’t take full advantage of the consoles, so you’ll need to spend more on the Gigabyte M32U if you want that.

            As expected for a basic office-oriented monitor, its motion handling isn’t anything special, but it’s still okay, and there isn’t too much blur behind fast-moving objects. It has low input lag for a responsive feel while gaming, and it’s lower than 4k TVs, which is an advantage of gaming on a monitor. It even has VRR support that works with the Xbox but not with the PS5 because the PS5 requires HDMI Forum VRR support. Still, if you need a basic 4k monitor for gaming, it does the trick.

            See our review

          Notable Mentions

          • Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 S32BG75:
            The Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 is a lower-end version of the Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 S32BG85 with a lower 165Hz refresh rate. It uses the same Mini LED backlighting. However, for a bit less, you can get the LG 32GQ950-B, which has nearly the same max refresh rate.
            See our review
          • LG 27GP950-B:
            The LG 27GP950-B is a smaller version of the LG 32GQ950-B that costs less and performs about the same, but it has worse motion handling.
            See our review
          • Gigabyte AORUS FO48U:
            The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED is a fantastic gaming monitor with an OLED panel for fantastic picture quality. It’s a good choice if you want a larger screen than the LG 32GQ950-B or the Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 S32BG85, but it’s limited to a 120Hz refresh rate.
            See our review
          • Dell S3221QS:
            The Dell S3221QS is a basic 4k monitor that’s bigger than the Dell S2721QS. It’s better for dark room gaming as it has a higher contrast, but it has worse motion handling and costs a bit more, so if you’re on a budget, it’s worth getting the S2721QS.
            See our review

          Recent Updates

          1. Sep 29, 2022:
            Restructured article to reflect user needs; added the Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 and the LG 32GQ950-B and renamed the Gigabyte M32U as the ‘Best Mid-Range Monitor’ because the other two have more features. Removed the Gigabyte M32UC, LG 27GP950-B, and the LG C1 because they aren’t as good as the other monitors on the list; replaced the Dell S2722QC with the cheaper Dell S2721QS; updated Notable Mentions based on changes.

          2. Jul 07, 2022:
            Restructured the article to better match what people are looking for. Added the Gigabyte M32UC as the ‘Best For Dark Rooms’. Removed Notable Mentions that are no longer relevant.

          3. May 06, 2022:
            Moved the Gigabyte AORUS FV43U and the LG 27GP950-B to their own categories. Removed the Dell S3221QS as a pick, as there are better choices available.

          4. Apr 06, 2022:
            Verified our picks for accuracy and refreshed the text throughout.

          5. Mar 10, 2022:
            Swapped the LG 48 C1 OLED and the Gigabyte AORUS FV43U with each other as main and alternative picks. The LG is now the ‘Best For HDR’, and the Gigabyte is the ‘LED Alternative’.

          All Reviews

          Our recommendations are based on what we think are the best gaming monitors with a 4k resolution currently available. They’re adapted to be valid for most people, in each price range. Rating is based on our review, factoring in price, and feedback from our visitors.

          If you would prefer to make your own decision, here is the list of all of our 4k monitor reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. Most monitors are good enough to please most people, and the things we fault monitors on are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

          Discussions

          The 5 Best 4k 144Hz Monitors — Fall 2022: Reviews

          1. Table of Contents
          2. Intro
          3. Best Monitor

            1. Best Mid-Range

              1. Best Budget

                1. Best HDR

                  1. Best Large

                    1. Notable Mentions
                    2. Recent Updates
                    3. All Reviews
                    4. Discussions

                    Updated Aug 17, 2022 at 01:07 pm

                    By Nicholas Di Giovanni

                    4k 144Hz gaming monitors deliver the holy grail of gaming as they combine high pixel resolutions with a high refresh rate for a smooth and immersive gaming experience. You need a graphics card that supports the higher bandwidth that the high refresh rate and high resolution demand. The release of newer graphics cards and gaming consoles has started to change that, and 4k 144Hz monitors are starting to become more available, even at lower costs. It’s no surprise that most of them offer HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, and many of them have dedicated console modes specifically designed for the new consoles.

                    We’ve bought and tested over 245 monitors, and below are our picks for the best 4k 144Hz monitors to buy. Also, see our recommendations for the best monitors for Xbox Series X, the best monitors for PS5, and the best monitors for PC gaming.

                    1. Best 4k 144Hz Monitor

                      Gigabyte M32U

                      SEE PRICE

                      Amazon.de

                      Unavailable

                      Missing store

                      Gaming

                      8.6

                      Size

                      32″

                      Resolution

                      3840×2160

                      Pixel Type

                      IPS

                      HDR10

                      Yes

                      Variable Refresh Rate

                      Yes

                      Max Refresh Rate

                      144Hz

                      See all our test results

                      The best 4k 144Hz gaming monitor we’ve tested is the Gigabyte M32U. It’s an excellent gaming monitor with a fast response time, resulting in crystal-clear motion with almost no noticeable blur. There’s even an optional backlighting strobing feature that reduces persistence blur, and unlike most monitors, it also works with the variable refresh rate (VRR) feature enabled. It supports FreeSync and G-SYNC compatible VRR technology, which helps reduce tearing when your source can’t maintain a consistently high frame rate.

                      It has HDMI 2.1 bandwidth on two ports and supports 4k @ 120Hz gaming from the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X consoles. There are some limits when gaming on a PS5, though, as the ports are limited to 24 Gbps bandwidth, meaning higher bandwidth signals require a form of compression currently unsupported on the PS5. It mainly affects the text clarity as it uses chroma subsampling, but this doesn’t affect the gaming or overall picture quality. If it’s an issue for you when it comes to PC gaming, then the LG 27GP950-B is a good alternative with the full bandwidth of HDMI 2. 1, but it also has a smaller screen size and worse ergonomics, so the Gigabyte is still better overall.

                      See our review

                    2. Best Mid-Range 4k 144Hz Monitor

                      Gigabyte M32UC

                      SEE PRICE

                      Amazon.de

                      Unavailable

                      Missing store

                      Gaming

                      8.7

                      Size

                      32″

                      Resolution

                      3840×2160

                      Pixel Type

                      VA

                      Variable Refresh Rate

                      Yes

                      HDR10

                      Yes

                      Max Refresh Rate

                      160Hz

                      See all our test results

                      If you want something cheaper with similar features and performance, then you should look for something in the mid-range price category like the Gigabyte M32UC. It’s similar to the Gigabyte M32U, with the main difference being that it has another panel type. This means that the M32UC is the better choice for dark room gaming because it displays deeper blacks, but it isn’t as good for co-op gaming as it has worse viewing angles. Besides that, it has the same HDMI 2.1 bandwidth that makes it ideal for console gaming, and while it has a 144Hz native refresh rate, you can overclock it to 160Hz. Gaming feels responsive thanks to its low input lag, and it also has a quick response time, but there’s some black smearing with fast-moving objects.

                      Colors look good, as it has good out-of-the-box accuracy and displays a wide range of colors both in SDR and HDR. The reflection handling is good, and it easily gets bright enough to fight glare if you want to use it in a well-lit room. It also gets bright in HDR to make some highlights stand out, but as it lacks a local dimming feature, small highlights don’t pop against the rest of the screen.

                      See our review

                    3. Best Budget 4k 144Hz Monitor

                      Gigabyte M28U

                      SEE PRICE

                      Amazon. de

                      Unavailable

                      Missing store

                      Gaming

                      8.6

                      Size

                      28″

                      Resolution

                      3840×2160

                      Pixel Type

                      IPS

                      HDR10

                      Yes

                      Variable Refresh Rate

                      Yes

                      Max Refresh Rate

                      144Hz

                      See all our test results

                      While you won’t exactly find 4k 144Hz monitors in the budget category, the Gigabyte M28U is the best 4k monitor you can get with a 144Hz refresh rate for a low cost. It’s essentially a smaller version of the Gigabyte M32U, with a few minor differences, like a different stand that has worse ergonomics since it doesn’t have swivel adjustments, but that’s only an issue if you need to constantly adjust the screen. It has excellent gaming performance and is versatile enough if you want to use it for other uses.

                      Like the larger variant, it has an excellent response time at its max refresh rate of 144Hz and remains quick at 120Hz if you want to use it for console gaming. It also has native FreeSync support and works with NVIDIA graphics cards for G-SYNC compatibility. Gaming feels responsive thanks to its incredibly low input lag, and it doesn’t increase much at lower refresh rates. It also delivers great picture quality in bright rooms as it has excellent peak brightness, enough to fight glare. However, it doesn’t look as good in dark rooms as the Gigabyte M32UC because it has lower contrast and a terrible local dimming feature.

                      See our review

                    4. Best 4k 144Hz Monitor For HDR

                      Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 S32BG75

                      Unavailable

                      Amazon. de

                      Unavailable

                      Missing store

                      Gaming

                      8.8

                      Size

                      32″

                      Resolution

                      3840×2160

                      Pixel Type

                      VA

                      Variable Refresh Rate

                      Yes

                      HDR10

                      Yes

                      Max Refresh Rate

                      165Hz

                      See all our test results

                      If you play HDR games, you need something that provides great HDR performance, like the Samsung LS32BG752NNXGO. It’s different from the other monitors in this list because it’s one of the first to use Mini LED backlighting, providing greater control over its local dimming than most monitors. It means it has a decent local dimming feature that produces deep blacks without much blooming around bright objects. It also gets bright enough to make those small highlights pop, and colors look vivid thanks to its great color gamut and HDR color volume, providing a satisfying HDR experience.

                      It’s a 4k monitor with a 165Hz max refresh rate, but its performance remains the same with a 144 fps signal. It has a quick response time across its entire refresh rate range, but like the Gigabyte M32UC, there’s some overshoot that leads to black smearing with some fast-moving objects. The input lag is also low for a responsive feel, and it has VRR support to reduce screen tearing. However, there are some bugs with its VRR, particularly at low frame rates, so if that bothers you and you play SDR games, it’s better to stick with the Gigabyte M32U.

                      See our review

                    5. Best Large 4k 144Hz Monitor

                      Gigabyte AORUS FV43U

                      SEE PRICE

                      Amazon.de

                      Unavailable

                      Missing store

                      Mixed Usage

                      7.8

                      Office

                      6.8

                      Gaming

                      8.5

                      Media Consumption

                      8.2

                      Media Creation

                      7. 7

                      HDR

                      8.3

                      Size

                      43″

                      Resolution

                      3840×2160

                      Pixel Type

                      VA

                      HDR10

                      Yes

                      Variable Refresh Rate

                      Yes

                      Max Refresh Rate

                      144Hz

                      See all our test results

                      Should you be looking for a 4k 144Hz monitor with a large screen, the Gigabyte AORUS FV43U is a great choice. It’s a unique monitor because it has a large 43-inch screen that’s an advantage if you like to play immersive games and you don’t want to get a 43-inch TV that usually costs more. Also, unlike TVs, this one is an actual monitor with a DisplayPort input. Even though it has a lower pixel density than other 4k monitors due to the large size, the image clarity is still good. However, it uses a different BGR subpixel layout that not all programs support, but this isn’t much of an issue while gaming.

                      In terms of gaming performance, it has native FreeSync support and is G-SYNC compatible over a DisplayPort connection. The response time is great at its max refresh rate, but like other VA panel displays, there’s black smearing with some fast-moving content in dark scenes. Input lag is low, and it supports HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, but like the Gigabyte M32U, it doesn’t support full HDMI 2.1 bandwidth as it’s limited to 24 Gbps, but that isn’t a problem if your graphics card supports compression.

                      See our review

                    Notable Mentions

                    • Dell G3223Q:
                      The Dell G3223Q is an excellent gaming monitor with similar specs to the Gigabyte M32U, but since it costs more, it’s worth going with the Gigabyte.
                      See our review
                    • Samsung LS32BG852NNXGO:
                      The Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 is a 4k monitor with a 240Hz refresh rate that’s similar to the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 S32BG75, but it isn’t worth getting if you’re playing at a max of 144Hz because it costs more than the Neo G7.
                      See our review

                    Recent Updates

                    1. Aug 17, 2022:
                      Renamed categories to reflect market availability and how people are searching for monitors; renamed the Gigabyte M32U to the ‘Best 4k 144Hz Monitor’, the Gigabyte M28U to ‘Best Budget’, and the Gigabyte FV43U to the ‘Best Large Monitor’. Removed the LG 27GP950-B and the Samsung Odyssey G7; added the Gigabyte M32UC as the ‘Best Mid-Range’ and the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 as the ‘Best For HDR’; updated Notable Mentions based on changes.

                    2. Apr 19, 2022:
                      Moved the Gigabyte M28U to its own category as the ‘Best 28 Inch Monitor’ for consistency and added the LG 48 C1 to Notable Mentions.

                    3. Feb 17, 2022:
                      Verified our picks for accuracy and refreshed the text. Removed a few out-of-date Notable Mentions.

                    4. Jan 27, 2022:
                      Added the Samsung Odyssey G7 S82AG70 as a ‘Cheaper Alternative’ to the LG 27GP950-B to reflect user needs.

                    5. Jan 06, 2022:
                      Verified picks for availability and updated text for clarity; added the Gigabyte AORUS FI32U and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27UQ to Notable Mentions.

                    All Reviews

                    Our recommendations are based on what we think are the best 4k 144Hz gaming monitors currently available. They’re adapted to be valid for most people, in each price range. Rating is based on our review, factoring in price, and feedback from our visitors.

                    If you would prefer to make your own decision, here is the list of all of our 4k 144Hz monitor reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. Most monitors are good enough to please most people, and the things we fault monitors on are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

                    Discussions

                    Best 4K Gaming Monitors 2022

                    The sharpest Ultra HD displays

                    By Matthew S. Smith

                    Updated: Sep 26, 2022 6:30 am

                    Posted: Sep 11, 2022 9:30 pm

                    A 4K gaming monitor is the ultimate way to experience your favorite PC games. The enhanced resolution provides incredible sharpness that brings out details you’d miss at a lower resolution. Distant objects that were once a blurry mess become clear as day because these displays are showing four times the resolution of a 1080p gaming monitor.

                    Buying a 4K gaming monitor is an investment, however, as most models are at least $500. You may spend several times that for a high-refresh display that supports both AMD FreeSync and Nvidia G-Sync. We’ve compared dozens of options to find the best 4K gaming monitors available right now – and click here to find them in the UK.

                    TL;DR – These are the Best 4K Gaming Monitors:

                    • Acer Nitro XV282K
                    • Gigabyte M28U
                    • Dell S2721QS
                    • Sony Inzone M9
                    • Asus ROG Swift PG32UQ
                    • Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX
                    • LG UltraGear 48GQ900

                    1. Acer Nitro XV282K

                    Best 4K Gaming Monitor

                    Acer Nitro XV282K

                    • See it on Best Buy

                    Screen Size: 27” | Aspect Ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: IPS FreeSync | Brightness: 400 nits | Refresh rate: 170Hz | Response time: 1ms | Inputs: 2x HDMI 2. 1, 1x DisplayPort, 2x USB-A

                    The Acer Nitro XV282K is an easy recommendation among the current crop of 4K gaming monitors. It hits a value sweet spot by providing a high maximum refresh rate, multiple HDMI 2.1 ports, and great image quality for less than $1,000. This is an IPS monitor with a refresh rate that can overclock up to 170Hz. Motion clarity is excellent and AMD FreeSync is supported. G-Sync support is not official, though we tested the monitor with G-Sync and found it worked without flaw.

                    The monitor’s contrast ratio is high for an IPS panel. A wide color gamut and great color accuracy provide a vivid, lifelike picture. It’s a bright display, as well, with a sustained peak of 400 nits. Most games look stunning. Build quality is modest, though fine. The stand looks unimpressive but adjusts for height and keeps the display stable. Around back you’ll find two HDMI 2.1 ports and DisplayPort, while USB-A ports are available for adding wired peripherals.

                    2. Gigabyte M28U

                    Best Budget 4K Gaming Monitor

                    Gigabyte M28U

                    • See it on Best Buy

                    Screen Size: 28” | Aspect Ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: IPS FreeSync | Brightness: 300 nits | Refresh rate: 144Hz | Response time: 1ms | Inputs: 2x HDMI 2. 1, 1x DisplayPort, 1x USB-C, 3x USB-A

                    The Gigabyte M28U is perfect for gamers who don’t have a ton of cash but still want a 4K monitor with a high refresh rate. It offers both a price far lower than most alternatives.

                    On top of being cheap, the M28U has a colorful, accurate image with excellent sharpness. The 144Hz refresh rate and IPS panel hold up in fast-paced games. The catch? Brightness. At 300 nits sustained, the M28U could seem dim when used in a bright room.

                    Build quality is acceptable. The Gigabyte M28U looks basic, but inoffensive, and includes a height-adjustable stand. It supports HDMI 2.1, USB-C, and has three USB-A ports, features that aren’t found on some more expensive alternatives.

                    3. Dell S2721QS

                    Best Ultra-Cheap 4K Gaming Monitor

                    Dell S2721QS

                    Screen Size: 27” | Aspect Ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: IPS FreeSync | Brightness: 400 nits | Refresh rate: 60Hz | Response time: 5ms | Inputs: 1x HDMI, 1x DisplayPort

                    Want a 4K gaming monitor for about $400, or less? Dell’s S272QS is a general-use monitor that’s also suitable for gaming. Image quality is excellent. The monitor’s sharpness, brightness, contrast, and color accuracy are all comparable to the Acer Nitro XV282K. Its color gamut is not as wide as most monitors on this list, but it’s still fine for gaming.

                    This is a 60Hz display and the IPS panel lists a typical response time of 5 milliseconds, so gaming will not feel as smooth as a 144Hz alternative. FreeSync is supported, at least. Build quality is good. The white-and-silver finish fits in a typical home office setup. A height-adjustable stand is included. Ports are limited, though, with only HDMI and DisplayPort available.

                    4. Sony Inzone M9

                    Best 4K FreeSync Gaming Monitor

                    Sony Inzone M9

                    Screen size: 27″ | Aspect ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: LCD IPS G-Sync Compatible | HDR compatibility: DisplayHDR 600, HDR10 | Brightness: 600cd/m2 | Refresh rate: 144Hz | Response time: 1ms | Inputs: 2 x HDMI 2. 1, 1 x DisplayPort 1.4

                    The Sony Inzone M9 might be the brand’s first monitor in years, but delivers some of the best HDR gaming we’ve ever seen. Not only does it feature a 600-nit peak brightness that’s higher than most of its competition, but it also features 96 lighting zones to help drive better contrast so you can see pure darkness right next to blinding light. This gaming monitor can even self-tune its HDR capabilities when connected to a PS5 thanks to its Auto HDR Tonemapping feature.

                    This screen also has everything you want including a 4K resolution, 144Hz maximum refresh rate, FreeSync and VRR support, plus one DisplayPort and two HDMI 2.1 ports. It also looks as good as the picture it delivers with a modern white and black design that’s clean and maybe a bit PS5-inspired. For $900, this 4K gaming monitor delivers in every way and the only thing it lacks is video cables in the box.

                    5. Asus ROG Swift PG32UQ

                    Best 4K G-Sync Gaming Monitor

                    Asus ROG Swift PG32UQ

                    Screen Size: 32” | Aspect Ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: IPS G-Sync | Brightness: 600 nits | Refresh rate: 144Hz | Response time: 1ms | Inputs: 2x HDMI 2. 1, 1x DisplayPort, 2x USB-A

                    The Asus ROG Swift PG32UQ is among the few 4K gaming monitors with official G-Sync support. It’s a solid gaming display with awesome HDR performance. Image quality is better than average. The monitor supports a wide color gamut and has high color accuracy. It beats most competitors in brightness, hitting up to 600 nits in HDR mode. This provides punchy visuals when playing HDR games.

                    Motion clarity is great thanks to the 144Hz refresh rate and official G-Sync compatibility. Unlike many competitors, this monitor is listed on Nvidia’s website as officially certified. Build quality is a highlight. This is a large, sturdy monitor that looks and feels durable. The height-adjustable stand is among the most stable you’ll find. The monitor supports HDMI 2.1, DisplayPort, and has two USB-A ports.

                    6. Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX

                    Best 4K HDR Gaming Monitor

                    Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX

                    Screen Size: 32” | Aspect Ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: IPS G-Sync and FreeSync | Brightness: 1400 nits | Refresh rate: 144Hz | Response time: 1ms | Inputs: 3x HDMI 2. 0, 1x DisplayPort, 1x USB

                    The Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX is a nearly unbeatable gaming monitor. It serves up 4K sharpness with a dynamic Mini-LED backlight with 1,152 zones that can turn on and off independently. This helps the PG32UQX deliver a contrast ratio four times better than an average gaming monitor with an IPS panel. It can also hit a peak brightness of 1,400 nits and sustain about 600 nits, making it a killer HDR display. Color gamut and accuracy are class-leading, too.

                    The monitor has a 144Hz refresh rate. It supports AMD FreeSync and G-Sync Ultimate, which means it can provide smooth frame pacing even at low frame rates. Its IPS panel is not the most responsive, though, so you may see ghosting at times.

                    Build quality is excessive. This is a massive, hefty monitor that’s overkill for most gaming setups. It has unusual extras like a tripod mount for a webcam and a small LCD display that can show extra information like game framerate. Console gamers should note this monitor does not support HDMI 2. 1. However, it can achieve 120Hz gameplay on Xbox Series X|S models through a chroma subsampling mode. It can only display 60Hz with a PlayStation 5.

                    7. LG UltraGear 48GQ900

                    Best Big Screen 4K Gaming Monitor

                    LG UltraGear 48GQ900

                    Screen Size: 48” | Aspect Ratio: 16:9 | Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 | Panel type: OLED G-Sync Compatible, FreeSync | Brightness: 450cd/m2 | Refresh rate: 120Hz | Response time: 0.1ms | Inputs: 3 x HDMI 2.1, 1x DisplayPort 1.4, 2 x USB 2.0, 1 x USB 3.0

                    The LG UltraGear 48GQ900 is essentially everything we love about the latest LG C2, but turned into an oversized gaming monitor. Of course, with an OLED panel, you get all the benefits of true blacks, infinite contrast, and eye-popping color. That OLED panel also lends you plenty of gaming benefits including an incredibly low 0.1ms response time while displaying incredibly smooth motion.

                    Unlike its gaming TV equivalent, the LG UltraGear 48GQ900 comes with a narrower monitor stand, an anti-reflective finish, and a handy remote for changing inputs and settings. Lastly it features a refresh rate of 120Hz (or 138Hz while overclocked), and it supports AMD FreeSync Premium Pro and G-Sync compatibility.

                    Where to Get the Best 4K Gaming Monitor in the UK

                    Best Budget 4K Gaming Monitor

                    Gigabyte M28U

                    Best Ultra-Cheap 4K Gaming Monitor

                    Dell S2721QS

                    Best 4K FreeSync Gaming Monitor

                    Samsung Odyssey G70A

                    Best Big Screen 4K Gaming Monitor

                    Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

                    Best 4K OLED Gaming Monitor

                    LG C1 48-inch

                    What you need to look for in a 4K Gaming Monitor

                    4K is pushing the limit of what’s possible on a typical gaming PC, so 4K gaming monitors don’t support some features found at other resolutions. For example, you won’t find any 360Hz or 240Hz gaming monitors that output at Quad HD. Most models aren’t great at HDR, either, with a few exceptions noted on this list.

                    All 4K monitors produce a sharp image, so you’re pretty much free to choose a screen size as big as you want and your budget will warrant. Because the pixel density is so tight you generally want to pick a display that’s at least 27 to 32 inches. And if you really want to go big, we generally feel that you can’t see the individual pixels of a 4K screen until you get up to a 65 inch.

                    Conversely though, sharpness generally improves as the size of a display decreases. The same number of pixels are packed in a smaller space. A 27-inch or 28-inch 4K monitor will be sharper than a 32-inch monitor, which will appear sharper than a 43-inch or 48-inch alternative. The difference is minor but worth considering if image clarity is your top priority.

                    Most 4K monitors use an IPS display panel that offer a lackluster contrast ratio. The good news is they also sport high brightness, great motion clarity, and accurate color. A rare few alternatives use a VA panel. This type of display boosts contrast ratio and retains good color performance, though often at the cost of motion clarity in dark scenes.

                    Gamers should keep an eye out for new models with a Mini-LED backlight. This pairs an IPS panel with an array of LED dimming zones to improve contrast. Mini-LED monitors deliver eye-searing HDR, as well. So far, there’s only a handful of Mini-LEDs options on the market, but they’ll become more common in the near future.

                    OLED is mostly exclusive to the television market for now. A few 4K OLED monitors are available, such as the LG 32EP950-B, but they’re extremely expensive and target professional media production instead of gaming.

                    Most 4K gaming monitors max out at a 144Hz refresh rate, though some slightly exceed that with an overclocking mode. This might seem disappointing at a glance. 4K gaming places a heavy load on a gaming PC, however, so many games will fail to constantly hit 144 frames per second, nevermind 240 FPS or more.

                    All the monitors on this list support AMD FreeSync or Nvidia G-Sync, and some support both. Nvidia fans should note that monitors which do not officially support Nvidia G-Sync may still work with Nvidia video cards. If you want a monitor with a G-Sync module, however, check out our round-up of the best G-Sync monitors.

                    If you buy something through this post, IGN may get a share of the sale. For more, learn more.

                    what you need to use them

                    A new slew of 4K, HDR and high-resolution monitors are starting to appear after years of delay, and many gamers around the world are excited that the era of high-speed 4K gaming has finally arrived. But not every PC will have the specs needed to run these monolithic monitors, so what do you need to get up and play 4K 144Hz by the time it arrives on your doorstep?

                    4K 144Hz: what is so much being talked about?

                    More discerning gaming aficionados may have already noticed that even though 144Hz is impressive, with some panels released today already approaching 240Hz, what’s so special?

                    The difference here is that unlike 240Hz monitors, which are currently limited to 1920 x 1080 pixels, until now 4K monitors could only go up to a whopping 60Hz. This new line of monitors represents a generational leap in gaming technology where cables used backstage are the main limiter.

                    You see, for a monitor to operate at a high resolution coupled with a high refresh rate, the channel carrying all this information must be able to handle the huge amount of bandwidth pumped through it accordingly. At the moment, the only display cable that supports 4K 144Hz bandwidth is DisplayPort 1.4. HDMI 2.1 doesn’t support anything other than 4K 60Hz, and even then it doesn’t support G-Sync or HDR. (Both are available on dual monitors released this year.)

                    Talk to any hardcore multiplayer players and they’ll say the upgrade is worth it. An indescribably smooth ride is achieved when going from 60Hz to 144Hz, and when playing competitive games like Counter Strike: Global Offensive or Rainbow Six: Siege, the increased refresh means you’ll see the enemy on your screen many milliseconds before as he sees. you.

                    Add 4K to the mix and you have a deadly combo. The increased pixel ratio means you’ll be able to make out the finest details on the screen, which in a competitive environment can mean the difference between a headshot and a bodyshot. Rainbow Six is ​​a game that especially benefits from this type of advantage, where the corners you need to hold to win a firefight with your opponent can literally be two pixels wide or less in some circumstances.

                    144Hz 4K monitors mean gamers no longer have to compromise between high refresh rates and pixel density. But for all the benefits you get from these new monitors, the entry price is equally high.

                    4K 144Hz: what do you need to run it?

                    As many reviewers and game journalists have pointed out, the ASUS ROG PG27UQ and Acer Predator X27 4K 144Hz G-Sync HDR monitors feel like they’re putting the cart before the horse. A high refresh rate doesn’t mean squatting if in fact you can’t reach high enough fps to match, which means if you don’t have hardware that can run a 4K game at 144fps and above , you’re probably better off spending your hard-earned $2,000 elsewhere.

                    An extremely well-optimized game like CS:GO is one of the few games of 2018 that can run over 144fps on modern GPUs like the Nvidia GTX 1080Ti. However, for more resource intensive games like Far Cry 5, the best you can expect is somewhere in the 100-120 fps range with the same 4K resolution card. This means that all that extra 100Hz to 144Hz upgrade is essentially for nothing.

                    However, many analysts expect Nvidia’s next line of RTX 20XX graphics cards to fill in the gaps in this department. The new cards will feature a performance boost of around 60% over the current generation, so running both competitive and graphics-intensive games at around 144fps or more at 4K resolution shouldn’t theoretically be a problem.

                    You will also need the same powerful processor to support 4K 144FPS game performance, i.e. only Intel Core i7-6700K and above. This aspect of the build is less important than the graphics card, but in the long run a large GPU will still be a CPU bottleneck if below a certain generation mark.

                    4K 144Hz monitors: is it worth buying?

                    Only buy it if you really need it. At present, the technology is still in its infancy and there are many improvements that can still be made with the second generation releases. What’s more, many people agree that the benefit you’ll get from 4K resolution is largely on a simple 27-inch monitor (the maximum size of both offerings on the shelves right now).

                    Add to that the hefty $2,000 price tag, and you’ll quickly realize that this technology is for the few high-end PC gamers who have a lot of savings on their favorite hobby and don’t either. Don’t forget to be an early adopter.

                    If you’re into CS:GO tournaments and need a slight edge in 4K over 1440P (and you have the hardware to support overclocking), by all means spend your money however you like. Otherwise, if you’re like the rest of us, you’re probably better off with a slightly more manageable 2560 x 1440P 165Hz monitor like the ASUS ROG Switch PG279Q, which is three times cheaper.

                    Image credit: Lr43_L1000489

                    60Hz, 144Hz and 240Hz monitors — when it makes sense to upgrade Hz. If you’ve been using a standard 60Hz monitor all your life so far, it can be difficult to know if going to 144Hz or 240Hz would be a good idea or not.

                    In this article, we’ve outlined the main differences between 60Hz, 144Hz, and 240Hz and provided some advice on when to upgrade. For those who are following these monitors for a future purchase, be sure to check out the latest 144 9 monitor news0051 (GamingScan) Hz and GamingScan (144Hz Monitors) .

                    Monitors (vs 240Hz) with 60Hz, 144Hz and 240Hz (Monitors) — what is the difference (Difference2) ?

                    The «Hz» used in the (s description) monitor is used to describe its refresh rate. The higher the Hz, the more frequently the screen will be updated. For example, a 60Hz monitor will update image 60 (image 60) times per second, and a 144Hz monitor is 144 (image 144) times per second.

                    But what does this mean for real world use (world use) ?

                    Essentially, a higher refresh rate means that the image you see is updated faster. This can be very useful for action games or competitive games where every millisecond counts.

                    Refresh rate works similar to how frames per second work in video games (video game work) but there are differences.

                    Frames per second explains how many frames per second your graphics card displays, and monitor refresh rate explains how many times your image actually refreshes on your monitor.

                    So if you have 300 fps in your game, but you’re using a 60Hz monitor, what you’re displaying will have 5 times fewer frame «updates» than is potentially possible.

                    For this reason, switching to a new monitor with more than high refresh rate is not (refresh rate isn’t) worth it if your graphics card can’t reliably run at 60fps or higher. You can easily check the frames per second for a game (check the frames per second for a game) on your system using various utilities.

                    Some people exclaim that the eye can only see a certain number of frames per second. This is not true and has mostly been debunked as a myth. Our eyes don’t work like displays, so it’s hard to measure how many «frames» per second we can see.

                    What we do know is that those who have used 144Hz monitors can agree that they can see and feel the difference while gaming.

                    In fact, the most noticeable difference is that when a 144Hz user goes to a 60Hz display — many regular users of 144Hz displays report that they can see everything from video games to cursor speed (cursor speed) on their desktop, and (desktop feel) feel sluggish when they return to 60 Hz.

                    Another important thing to keep in mind is that display technology, (display technology) which is usually used for monitors with a higher refresh rate (refresh rate) , is not the best option. for general display quality and color accuracy (display quality and color accuracy) .

                    If looks matter to you, choose the high quality 60Hz monitor. (quality 60Hz) If you care about performance, frame rate (frame rate) and get a competitive edge, you should choose monitor with higher refresh rate (rate monitor) refresh rate.

                    If you need both features on the same monitor, be prepared to pay a high price. The latest Acer Predator X27 monitor has all the high-end features: 4K resolution, Nvidia G-sync , refresh rate (refresh rate) 144Hz , HDR , brightness 1000 nits etc. but costs a whopping $2,000 right now. The Asus ROG Swift PG27UQ has similar hardware and a similar price.

                    Should I switch from 60 Hz to 144 Hz?

                    We are now approaching the point where it is fairly easy to buy or build a computer capable of running at 120 or more frames per second in video game (video game) . In fact, most of the esports games available on PC can get up to 300 fps on high end computers.

                    If you can consistently run the games you play at over 120fps, then upgrading to 144Hz is worth it, but should only be considered if you’re concerned about performance improvements.

                    Monitors with a frequency of 144 Hz are most often used in games such as Counter Strike : Global Offensive or League (Offensive or League) of Legends , where each additional frame and micromovement has a value of (frame and micromovement counts) .

                    Here is a checklist to consider before upgrading:

                    ● You need a competitive edge
                    ● You do not object to (t mind) loss of color accuracy or image quality (color accuracy or display quality) in movies and games for productivity
                    ● Your computer is capable of running games at 100 frames or more.

                    Obviously, the higher the resolution of your monitor, the more powerful graphics card you will need to get higher frame rates. Currently (Currently) no graphics card can exceed 60 fps on a 4K monitor at ultra settings. You’ll have to wait for the new Series 9 cards to come out0057 NVIDIA GTX 11xx late 2018.

                    However, you can protect your future purchase by purchasing a monitor that can support higher frame rates so your games will benefit significantly if you decide to upgrade your graphics card later.

                    Should I switch from 144 Hz to 240 Hz?

                    240Hz monitors are much newer than 144Hz monitors, but they are becoming more common.

                    The general consensus regarding 240Hz monitors seems to be that if your PC can reliably handle 240 frames in a game, this could be a worthwhile upgrade. For now, this only fits 19 monitors20×1080. It will be a long time before you see 4K monitors at 240Hz.

                    Many consumer reviews and reports on 240Hz monitors suggest that upgrading from 144Hz to 240Hz does not provide the same performance jump as going from 60Hz to 144Hz, but there is a noticeable difference.

                    It’s also worth noting that some monitors with refresh rate (refresh rate) 200Hz have a higher resolution, such as 2560×1080 or 3440×1440 (ultrawide). Some examples include the Acer Predator x35 and the Asus ROG Swift PG35VQ. None of them have been released yet.

                    We’ve provided a checklist below to help you decide if upgrading to 240Hz is worth it:

                    ● You compete in video games at a high level.
                    ● You need the maximum advantage over other players
                    . ● Your computer can reliably run the games you play at 240 frames or more
                    . ● You don’t mind (t mind) pay a lot for a monitor and realize that the price of 240Hz monitors may come down as the technology becomes more popular.

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                  9. Best of the Best Gaming Monitor 2021 | 4K, 1ms, 360Hz, IPS

                    ENJOY YOUR GAME WITH MSI’S FULL RANGE OF 4K GAMING MONITORS WITH UP TO 360Hz REFRESH AND 1MS RESPONSE TIME.

                    MSI PLANS TO EXPAND THE LINE OF BEST GAMING MONITORS WITH 144Hz, 165Hz, 180Hz, 240Hz, 360Hz RESPONSE TIME AND 1MS RESPONSE TIME. EQUIPPED WITH G-SYNC OR FREESYNC AND 4K WIDE COLOR GAMING, MSI’S GAMING MONITOR PROVIDES A SMOOTH GAMING WITHOUT TEARING, FASTING AND Flickering.

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