Ryzen 7 3700x gaming benchmark: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X review

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X review

Our Verdict

The Ryzen 7 3700X doesn’t dazzle with a dozen cores, but it’s still an impressive CPU. It’s the sensible choice when compared with the more extreme 3900X.

For
  • Efficient and fast
  • PCIe Gen4 and 7nm
  • Relatively affordable
Against
  • Slightly slower in games
  • Limited overclocking potential
  • Is the firmware done yet?

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AMD’s third-generation Ryzen CPUs boast higher clockspeeds and more cores than the previous first and second gen parts, and the Ryzen 7 3700X is now one of the best CPUs for gaming. Zen 2 CPUs are so good that AMD almost doesn’t need the faster offerings. Its second-string 3700X is perfectly capable of running the offense, and it isn’t quite as demanding when it comes to signing bonuses and contracts. For those teams (aka PCs) with salary cap concerns that can’t quite justify chasing the 3900X, the 3700X is a versatile QB that can throw a quick short pass, scamper downfield for a modest gain, or even launch the long ball when occasion requires.

When it comes to playing football—running PC games—there’s not a huge difference between the 3700X and the 3900X. In fact, there’s hardly any difference at all. For gaming, the 3700X and 3900X are effectively tied, and you can safely ignore the barely faster 3800X. It’s 1-4 percent better (according to tests at Tom’s Hardware) for the extra $70. But I’m jumping ahead.

Here’s what the specs on AMD’s 2nd and 3rd gen Ryzen parts look like:

(Image credit: Future)

Maximum boost clocks on the 3800X are only 100MHz higher than the 3700X, but minimum ‘guaranteed’ clocks are potentially 300MHz higher. In practice, however, the 3700X mostly runs well above the minimum clockspeed, particularly in light to medium workloads. If you do a lot of 3D rendering or video encoding, moving to the Ryzen 9 3900X makes sense, but for everyone else the 3700X is a great choice. Alternatively, the previous gen AMD parts are now priced to move—the Ryzen 7 2700X regularly sells for $220 or less.

I’ve covered the architectural updates in detail elsewhere (Ryzen 3000 and Zen 2 architectural updates), so I’m not going to rehash that here. Basically, Zen 2 is better, smaller, and faster than Zen+ and the original Zen architectures. How much faster? That depends on what you’re doing, so let’s get to the benchmarks.

(Image credit: Future)

Ryzen 7 3700X testbed

Ryzen 7 3700X
Wraith Prism cooler
MSI MEG X570 Godlike
16GB G.Skill DDR4-3200 CL14
Corsair Force MP600 2TB
EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 G3
Phanteks Eclipse

All of the benchmarks that follow were done running the latest Windows 10 May 2019 update, with updated drivers and BIOS firmware. Unlike some other sites (and I’m not faulting their testing protocols. It’s just not how I do things), all CPUs are tested with high speed DDR4-3200 CL14 memory, with XMP memory profiles enabled. That’s sort of overclocking, and potentially helps AMD CPUs more than Intel chips, but this is the lightest/easiest form of overclocking around and all modern CPUs have easily handled the higher memory speeds. Every PC is on equal footing as much as possible, in other words.

As with other Ryzen CPUs, I didn’t do extensive overclocking tests on the Ryzen 7 3700X. That’s because it generally doesn’t help much. You sacrifice boost clocks for higher all-core clocks, though with the 3700X there’s at least a bit more gain from enabling Precision Boost Overdrive. It’s still only 200MHz extra at best, which means less than a 5 percent improvement, and often in the 1-3 percent range. The days of massive gains via overclocking your CPU are largely behind us now. Intel’s Core i9-9900K might get an extra 400MHz vs. stock, and AMD’s CPUs might get an extra 200-300MHz, which just isn’t that exciting. It’s the blessing and curse of increased competition.

All of AMD’s third-gen parts were tested in the MSI MEG X570 Godlike board (with similar results from Asus and Gigabyte boards). Besides the memory, I used a Gigabyte Aorus NVMe Gen4 2TB SSD for the main drive (another part of the AMD review kit), with a GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition graphics card.

(Image credit: Future)

Ryzen 7 3700X gaming performance

Starting with gaming performance, here’s how the Ryzen 7 3700X stacks up. All ten games are tested at 1080p ‘ultra’ (generally the highest possible settings, outside of super-sample anti-aliasing), and each test is run multiple times to ensure the consistency of results. Minimum fps is calculated as the average fps for the bottom three percent of frametimes—find the 97 percentile frametime, and sum up all frametimes above that, dividing by the number of frames. This provides a more useful metric than pure minimum fps or pure 97 percentile.

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Out of ten games tested, the 3700X and 3900X are pretty much tied, with the 3900X hanging on to a scant 0. 5 percent lead in framerates. That’s well within margin of error, and that’s with an RTX 2080 Ti at 1080p; move up to 1440p or 4K, or downgrade to a slower GPU, and the gap would almost completely disappear.

What about Intel and its Core i7-9700K and Core i9-9900K? The 9700K actually tops the overall gaming performance chart—yup, Hyper-Threading isn’t always beneficial for games. That makes the 9700K 10 percent than the 3700X, while the 9900K is 9 percent faster. Of course, that’s when running games at 1080p with the fastest current GPU available. The gap would be substantially smaller at 1440p and basically non-existent at 4K.

In other words, like the 3900X, AMD can’t lay claim to the gaming performance crown and in fact comes in behind even the older i7-7700K, depending on the game. If gaming is your number one priority, you’re still better off with an Intel CPU (never mind the various security exploits that have been patched over the past 18 months).

(Image credit: Future)

Ryzen 7 3700X application performance

Hit the showers and leave the field of games behind, and differences between the 9700K and 3700X swap places. Thanks to the extra threads available via SMT, the 3700X is about 18 percent faster than the 9700K in multithreaded workloads. Include all of the benchmarks and it’s about a 7 percent lead for AMD overall—and at a lower price, since you’d still need an aftermarket cooler with the 9700K.

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As I discussed in the 3900X review, it’s important to remember what these CPU benchmarks really mean. 3D rendering and y-cruncher are great tools for using all possible CPU resources. They’re also tools that the vast majority of people will never use (3D rendering in particular). Video encoding at least has some bearing on streaming performance, though I still think amateur streamers are better off using GPU encoding, and pro streamers should have a dedicated streaming PC.

The Zen 2 architectural updates are definitely a factor in CPU performance, and TSMC’s 7nm process gives AMD a manufacturing lead over Intel for the first time in… ever. Look no further than power use, where the 3700X topped out at 179W for heavily multithreaded workloads compared to the 9900K’s 242W, or the 9700K’s 208W. Intel’s 10nm node is now shipping, and may ultimately prove similar or perhaps even superior to TSMC’s 7nm, but it’s only in laptop parts and that doesn’t look set to change any time soon. Instead, rumors are that future 10th Gen 14nm Comet Lake Intel processors will keep Intel’s desktop playoff hopes alive. Which feels incredibly weird, but whatever.

(Image credit: Future)

Ryzen 7 3700X is an impressive CPU

AMD’s Ryzen processors continue to put the pressure on Intel, forcing increasingly potent CPUs into mainstream pricing. With third generation Ryzen, AMD effectively sounds the death-knell for HEDT platforms. I still love the idea of extreme performance, and the 56-core and 64-core server chips are cool, but I certainly don’t need them in my home PC. Frankly, with chips like the Ryzen 9 3900X, I don’t need any of the HEDT processors from Intel or AMD. When you can get a great 8-core chip for $329, and 12-core chips for $499, why bother with a more expensive motherboard, memory, CPU, and PSU?

Ryzen 7 3700X is a great CPU overall, and it’s arguably the sensible choice for most users. Why blow a ton of cash on your CPU and then have to cut back on your graphics card, storage, motherboard, and/or memory? Bang for the buck is always better if you step down a notch or two from the top-of-the-line parts. Raw performance is nice, but the balanced approach is often better. There’s nothing wrong with backing off a bit and getting a slightly less potent part at a far more reasonable price.

(Image credit: Future)

There are really only two potential concerns with the Ryzen 7 3700X. First, if you are planning on buying a top-tier GPU like the RTX 2080 Ti or RTX 2080 Super, and if you’re shooting for 144fps, Intel CPUs still win out in gaming performance. It varies by game, but at 1080p ultra I’ve measured up to a 30 percent difference in framerates, and even at 1440p high can still favor faster CPUs.

Second, overclocking of the latest AMD and Intel CPUs is becoming severely limited. On Intel, you can at least play with individual core multipliers, so maybe 5.0GHz on all cores, and 5.2GHz on 1/2-core loads. If you manually overclock an AMD chip, it’s one multiplier, period. So you might lose singlethreaded performance for a slight gain in multithreaded performance. PBO (Precision Boost Overdrive) allows the CPU to exceed the default clockspeeds depending on thermals, though you’ll generally want liquid cooling and still only get an extra 200MHz at most.

And just to be clear, neither of those drawbacks are insurmountable problems.

Anyone looking at building an AMD based PC will find a lot to like with the Ryzen 7 3700X. It’s basically as fast as the more expensive third gen Ryzen parts when it comes to gaming, and certainly fast enough for most other tasks. It’s also about 10 percent faster than the previous generation Ryzen 7 2700X in gaming performance, and 15 percent faster overall. And it might improve even a bit more if AMD and its partners ever get the firmware and turbo stuff sorted out.

Read our review policy

Ryzen 7 3700X

The Ryzen 7 3700X doesn’t dazzle with a dozen cores, but it’s still an impressive CPU. It’s the sensible choice when compared with the more extreme 3900X.

Jarred’s love of computers dates back to the dark ages when his dad brought home a DOS 2.3 PC and he left his C-64 behind. He eventually built his first custom PC in 1990 with a 286 12MHz, only to discover it was already woefully outdated when Wing Commander was released a few months later. He holds a BS in Computer Science from Brigham Young University and has been working as a tech journalist since 2004, writing for AnandTech, Maximum PC, and PC Gamer. From the first S3 Virge ‘3D decelerators’ to today’s GPUs, Jarred keeps up with all the latest graphics trends and is the one to ask about game performance. 

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X | TechRadar

TechRadar Verdict

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is a brilliant piece of hardware. With a TDP of just 65W, this chip is capable of delivering raw performance that would take other processors much more power to equal. The reasonable price tag is just a bonus.

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The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is the perfect representation of what AMD has tried to do for its mainstream consumers. It not only gets a boost in power over the chip it’s replaced but it offers lower power consumption as well.

And, while it might not quite match the performance of other AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation processors such as the Ryzen 9 3900X, it offers a lot of performance for not a lot of money. Building on the Ryzen 7 2700X’s 8-core, 16-thread setup, it is the ideal CPU for a lot of users.

Essentially, the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X has a lot going for it, from its performance and low power consumption to its very reasonable price. It is the best CPU for the masses. And, if you’re not convinced, just read the rest of this review to see what this processor is truly made of.

This is everything you get with the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X. (Image credit: Future)

Price and availability

  • AMD Ryzen 7 3700X (LED AMD Ryzen 7) at Amazon for $263

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X was rolled out on July 7, 2019 for $329 (£319, AU$519), which puts it in the same general price range as the last-generation Ryzen 7 2700X. This means that at least we’re not seeing any considerable price jumps from generation to generation. 

It gets more interesting, however, when you compare the Ryzen 7 3700X to its main competitor. The Intel Core i7-9700K is available for $374 (£384, AU$595), an 8-core processor with no hyperthreading, which means that the Ryzen 7 3700X offers twice the processing threads at a lower price tag. Intel is still king when it comes to single-core performance, but when it comes to multi-core ones, the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is the absolute beast.

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The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X’s single-threaded performance still falls behind Intel. (Image credit: Infogram)

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is an absolute behemoth when it comes to multi-threaded workloads. (Image credit: Infogram)
The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X’s single-threaded performance still falls behind Intel. (Image credit: Infogram)

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is an absolute behemoth when it comes to multi-threaded workloads. (Image credit: Infogram)
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The Ryzen 7 3700X has lower power consumption and higher performance at the same time. (Image credit: Infogram)
The Ryzen 7 3700X has lower power consumption and higher performance at the same time. (Image credit: Infogram)

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X has less stringent cooling needs. (Image credit: Infogram)
The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X has less stringent cooling needs. (Image credit: Infogram)

Specs and chipset

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, like the rest of AMD’s Zen 2 processors, is built on a 7nm manufacturing node – the smallest in a commercially available CPU. What this means for most people is lower power consumption and much improved performance at the same time. 

This decision to 7nm has brought a beefy 15% boost to IPC (instructions per clock) performance. Effectively, compared to a Ryzen 2nd Generation processor at the same clock speed, you will get a straight 15% increase in performance. That’s not big enough to be evident in day-to-day workloads, but it does still mean something.

The improvements don’t just end at IPC. With Ryzen 3rd Generation, as the CPU cores are on their own chiplets, AMD was able to pack way more L2 and L3 cache into the Ryzen 7 3700X – with 4MB and 32MB, respectively. Essentially, this processor has a grand total of 36MB of Cache, which AMD lumps together as ‘GameCache’. This GameCache isn’t anything entirely new, but it does show that this will help boost gaming performance in some cases – especially in older 1080p esports games.  

The major addition to the 3rd Generation of Ryzen, however, is PCIe 4.0. When paired with an AMD Navi graphics card like the Radeon RX 5700 XT or RX 5700, you’ll experience much better performance, thanks to increased bandwidth. 

However, the way we look at it, SSDs are the real stars of the PCIe 4.0 show. Through this superior connection, NVMe SSDs are potentially up to 51% faster than their non-PCIe 4.0 peers. In our own testing, the Aorus PCIe 4.0 SSD that AMD provided was able to get up to 4,996 MB/s sequential read speeds. That’s remarkably fast for an SSD.

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The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X managed 118 fps when paired with the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. (Image credit: Infogram)

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Test system specs

CPU: 3.8Ghz AMD Ryzen 7 3700X (8-core, 36MB cache, up to 4.4GHz)
GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
RAM: 16GB G. Skill Royale DDR4 (3,400MHz)
Motherboard: ASRock Taichi X570
Power Supply: Corsair RM850x
Storage: 2TB Gigabyte Aorus M.2 SSD (NVMe PCIe 4.0 x4) Case: Corsair Crystal Series 570X RGB
Operating system: Windows 10

Performance

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X has a 65W TDP, and with that fairly low amount of power, it’s able to deliver quite a lot. This processor can keep up with even the Intel Core i9-9900K, a processor that considerably costs more and consumes more power, with its TDP of 95W. 

The proof is in our benchmarks. In Cinebench R15, the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X got 2,087 points, next to the 1,873 scored by the Intel Core i9-9900K. 

In addition, the Ryzen 7 3700X scored a monstrous 34,515 in Geekbench compared to the 9900K’s 33,173 in the multi-core test. However, in the single-core test the Ryzen 7 3700X did fall behind, only scoring 5,590 points to the 9900K’s 6,333.  

What this all means is that the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is an absolute beast when it comes to multi-threaded workloads, especially at this price point. If you’re counting on doing some video editing or compiling one hell of an Excel spreadsheet, you’re going to see firsthand a performance boost with the Ryzen 7 3700X. 

In gaming, however, Intel pulls ahead, though only by a smaller margin than before. In Middle Earth: Shadow of War at 4K, the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X managed 118 fps when paired with the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, compared to the 120fps that the Intel Core i9-9900K was able to produce. That’s not a substantial difference by any means, but it is still a win in Intel’s corner. 

We do have to commend AMD, however, for including the Wraith Spire cooler with the Ryzen 7 3700X. While it isn’t exactly the most robust cooler in the world, it was able to keep the processor under 80 degrees Celsius, even during the most intensive tests.

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is another impressive release from AMD and its 3rd Generation of Ryzen chips. (Image credit: Future)

Final verdict

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is another impressive release from AMD and its 3rd Generation of Ryzen chips. With it, you’re getting 8-cores and 16-threads, with a boost clock of 4.4GHz. It may not be the strongest contender ever made on paper, but when you see and feel the actual performance gains it offers, you’re certainly getting a lot of bang for your $329 (£319, AU$519) buck.

Bear in mind, however, that if you already have something like the Ryzen 7 2700X, this generation doesn’t offer the biggest boost in performance. You might want to wait another year or so before dropping a few hundred bucks, or even opt to splurge on a higher-end but pricier chip.

With another remarkable chip from the Ryzen 3000 series, we can’t wait to see what the future holds for AMD processors. If the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is any indication, Team Red’s recent upset isn’t likely to end any time soon.

First reviewed July 2019

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Jackie Thomas is Deputy Editor at Decisionary. Previously, she was TechRadar’s US computing editor. She is fat, queer and extremely online. Computers are the devil, but she just happens to be a satanist. If you need to know anything about computing components, PC gaming or the best laptop on the market, don’t be afraid to drop her a line on Twitter or through email.

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X review: the best 8-core gaming CPU

AMD’s Ryzen 7 3700X is a generational CPU update that’s worth shouting about. Packed with the very latest AMD chiplet architecture, AMD Zen 2, and a minimal 65W TDP, this chip is the best eight-core processor in the Ryzen 3000 lineup – and all for little more than the Ryzen 7 2700X‘s price at launch.

The smart design of AMD Zen 2 allows the red team to bring high-performance, high-core-count computing to the mainstream. The ‘revolutionary chiplet design’ of the architecture, built on the 7nm process node, could be just the thing to kick Intel into second place and raise it up as number one purveyor of go-to gaming chips.

We’re putting that theory to the test with the Ryzen 7 3700X. This chip features the same total core count as its predecessor, the Ryzen 7 2700X, at eight cores and 16 threads. Plenty enough silicon for us gamers, and quite a bit else. AMD has seen fit to make some big changes to the underlying tech to increase instructions per clock (IPC) and power efficiency for even more bang for your buck than last time.

It’s a tad cheaper than the Intel Core i7 9700K, the de facto high-end gaming chip of the moment from Intel. And that also includes the Wraith Prism cooler. That’s a pretty good get.

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X specs

The Ryzen 7 3700X ushers in a new generation of AMD CPU architecture: Zen 2. Incorporating a new mixed-node chiplet design, this particular eight-core chip is fitted with a single 7nm CCD, complete with two 100% operational four-core CCX clusters. Co-inhabiting the AM4 socket space alongside that single CCD is a lone 14nm cIOD I/O die, which houses all of the non-core and I/O functionality.

Maintaining a steady flow of data between each discrete chiplet is AMD’s Infinity Fabric interconnect.

This menagerie of silicon chiplets sits happily at 3.6GHz base clock, and will boost up to 4.4GHz when required. That’s only a touch higher than the Ryzen 7 2700X at 3.7GHz base and 4.3GHz boost, which may make for some doubts as to the proficiency of this 7nm business. In a sense you’d be right to think so on clock speed alone. This first generation of chips on 7nm hasn’t made for a drastic uptake in clock speed over 12nm parts – those days are over – but there’s more to Zen 2 than mere clock speed.

Ryzen 9 3950X Ryzen 9 3900X Ryzen 7 3800X Ryzen 7 3700X Ryzen 5 3600X Ryzen 5 3600
Cores/threads 16/32 12/24 8/16 8/16 6/12 6/12
Turbo clock 4.7GHz 4.6GHz 4.5GHz 4.4GHz 4. 4GHz 4.2GHz
Base clock 3.5GHz 3.8GHz  3.9GHz  3.6GHz 3.8GHz 3.6GHz
TDP 105W 105W 105W 65W 95W 65W
Total cache 72MB 70MB  36MB 36MB 35MB 35MB
 Price $749 $499 $399 $329 $249 $199

This chip walks a fine line between expeditious efficacy and power efficiency. In fact, it’s the only X-series chip above the Ryzen 5 3600 to be squeezed into a 65W TDP. That’s all thanks to the 7nm process node allowing for much greater efficiency over its 12nm or 14nm predecessors. Total platform power of this octa-core processor reached just 148 watts under load in x264 v5.0 – 37% less than that required by the Ryzen 7 2700X.

The Zen 2 architecture is more than a process shrink, it’s an entirely overhauled architecture. AMD has increased IPC by a whopping 15% with Zen 2, achieved though various architectural changes. Notable changes include: front-end advances, doubling floating point performance, and reducing effective latency to memory.

One such tweak is the redesigned cache hierarchy. The CCX design is still a familiar sight on the surface, but L3 cache has actually been doubled over second generation Ryzen units. That all totals to 36MB of total cache with the Ryzen 7 3700X.

With near-total parity to the Ryzen 7 3800X in almost every way, aside from a marginal drop in clock speed, it would seem that the cheaper Ryzen 7 chip could become a threat to its bigger sibling in the hands of anyone with even the slightest idea of how to overclock.

AMD Ryzen 3700X benchmarks

PCGN test bench: MSI MEG ACE X570/MSI Gaming M7 AC X470/MSI MPG Gaming Edge AC Z390, 16GB Trident Z Royal/Corsair Dominator @ 3,200MHz, Samsung 970 Evo 2TB, Nvidia RTX 2080 Ti, Corsair HX1200i, Corsair h200i V2, Philips BDM3275

AMD Ryzen 3700X performance

The Ryzen 3700X is only a stone’s throw from Intel’s i7 9700K across most gaming benchmarks. With an overabundance of titles today still heavily reliant on single-threaded performance, it’s no wonder that Intel’s 4.9GHz takes the form of a healthy lead during bouts of high CPU usage.

AMD’s creeping closer than ever to closing that gaming deficit once and for all, however, and you’re only likely to see this divergence plain as day during 1080p gaming. That’s when modern high-end graphics card are capable of spitting out frames at rapid pace and putting the pressure to keep up squarely on your CPU. Crank that resolution up to 1440p or 4K and the workload swiftly shifts onto the GPU, and that disparity between AMD Ryzen 3000 and Intel’s 9th Gen Coffee Lake chips inches even closer.

In synthetic benchmarks the Ryzen 7 3700X excels once again, landing somewhere between Intel’s i9 9900K and i7 9700K. More often than not leaning towards Intel’s top gaming chip.

The marginal clock speed drop between the Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 7 3700X has also seemingly little impact on the gaming performance between these two processors. Only a few games take well to the 12 cores of the top chip, leaving much of the work to the rather minimal 200MHz clock speed bump between the pair.

But as a generational proposition the Ryzen 7 3700X is a significant upgrade on the Ryzen 7 2700X. In Total War: Three Kingdoms at 1080p, you can see that 15% IPC increase in action, with the Zen 2 chip outperforming its predecessor 131 frames per second on average to 114. This same story continues throughout, especially through Cinebench R20. Yet the largest success of the Ryzen 7 3700X lies just under the surface.

The Ryzen 7 3700X absolutely demolishes its predecessor in performance per watt. With a generous helping of 7nm efficiency gains, the 65W TDP of the latest chip makes for a chip that not only outperforms 2nd Gen Ryzen’s top chip, but does so without breaking a sweat at 148W total platform power in x264 v5.0 to the Ryzen 7 2700X’s 235W.

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X verdict

The shift from Ryzen 7 2700X to Ryzen 7 3700X has been a major step towards snatching the performance gaming market. AMD has ironed out the bugs, totally turned around on memory support, and put together a product that excels in the same, budget-friendly, price bracket as its predecessor.

Shaving off a couple of hundred megahertz here or there has allowed for considerable power savings, too. The 65W TDP of the Ryzen 7 3700X dramatically cuts this chip’s thirst compared to its predecessors. And while that slight saving on your electricity bill may not be convincing alone, it’s that overhead that offers overclockers a little more room to work in.

The processor still falls short of Intel in gaming at stock, however. That gap closes at higher resolutions, but the Intel i7 9700K remains out ahead in raw processor power that games love best. Yet AMD reaching near performance-parity with a cheaper product than the competition is something to behold, especially considering the aggressive pace with which it got to this point. That’s sure to win over a greater portion of the desktop market.

There is the added bonus of PCIe 4. 0 and X570 with the AMD chip. And the cooler included in the box is added value that reduces the overhead of building your system by potentially a fair wallop. On the question of value, it’s a big thumbs up for AMD and the Ryzen 7 3700X.

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

The Ryzen 7 2700X was already an Intel CPU killer, leaving the Ryzen 7 3700X needing to do very little to win over the market once again. But rather than rest on its laurels, AMD has released a fantastic generational upgrade worth shouting about.

9

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X vs Ryzen 5 5600X: Gaming Performance Compared

Towards the end of last year, AMD launched its Ryzen 5000 CPUs, snatching the gaming crown from Intel after three (2 and a half) generations of Zen. Featuring an IPC boost of 19%, higher boost clocks, and wider core complexes, we’re looking at generational gains ranging from 20-35%, especially in gaming workloads. You can read our architectural deep-dive of the Ryzen 5000 CPUs and the Zen 3 core here. We compared the inter-core and cache latency/bandwidth of Matisse and Vermeer and got some very interesting results.

In this post, we will be comparing the $299 (now $279) Ryzen 5 5600X against the now similarly priced Ryzen 7 3700X which packs two additional cores, and decide whether it’s better to opt for more cores or a higher IPC/boost clock combo for gaming.

Test Bench

  • Motherboard: ASRock X570 Taichi
  • Memory: Trident Royal Z 8GB x2 @ 3733MT/s (CL16)
  • Cooler: NZXT Kraken X73: 360mm (Special thanks to NZXT for providing the AIO cooler)
  • GPU: NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti
  • PSU: Corsair HX1000i

AMD Ryzen 5 5600X vs Ryzen 9 5900X: Specifications

Specs Ryzen 5 5600X Ryzen 5 3600X Ryzen 7 3700X Ryzen 9 5900X
Cores/Threads 6/12 6/12 8/16 12/24
Base Clock 3. 7GHz 3.8GHz 3.6GHz 3.7GHz
Boost Clock 4.6GHz 4.4GHz 4.4GHz 4.8GHz
L3 Cache 32MB 32MB 36MB 64MB
TDP 65W 95W 65W 105W
Price $299 $199 $304 $549

Out of the four processors that we’ll be testing, the Ryzen 9 5900X is the only one with a TDP of 105W. Despite using a high-end 360mm AIO cooler, the 5900X approached the 80-degree mark under heavy load. Technically, you can emulate the Ryzen 5 5600X by disabling one of the two CCXs on the 5900X but we decided to use the actual processors for the tests.

Ashes Escalation

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We tested all the games at 1080p ultra and then 720p medium to avoid any GPU bottlenecks that may otherwise affect the results. In Ashes of the Singularity at 1080, both the CPUs produced nearly identical averages and mildly different lows. This is despite the fact that this is easily one of the most CPU-intensive games on the market.

720p

Strangely, the Ryzen 5 5600X outperformed the 3700X as well as the 5900X with respect to the averages at 720p. In terms of the lows, the hex-core 5600X was once again faster than the older octa-core Ryzen part.

720p5600X

As you can see, the Ryzen 5 5600X reaches an average CPU load of 88% and a peak of 100%. The average thread utilization is also pretty high at 97%, with a minimum of 75%. The Ryzen 7 3700X, on the other hand, averaged a tad bit lower at 84%, with a minimum of 60% and a max of 100%. The clock speeds for the latter are quite a bit lower here (by 500MHz) while the GPU utilization is roughly the same. This indicates that the delta here is primarily due to the IPC/single-threaded performance deficit between the two, despite the fact that Ashes is easily on the most heavily multi-threaded titles.

3700X5900X

Assassins’ Creed Origins

1080p1080p720p720p

Assassins’ Creed Origins produces very predictable results. Going from the hex-core 3600X to the octa-core 3700X yields less than a handful of frames. In a similar fashion, going from the 5600X to the 5900X pushes you up by just over 5 FPS at 720p. For reference, the overall CPU utilization for the Ryzen 5 5600X averaged close to 70% while the 3700X averaged just over 55%.

Assassins’ Creed Valhalla

1080p1080p

At 1080p, Assassins’ Creed Valhalla runs into a GPU bottleneck with both the Ryzen 5 5600X and the 5900X posting similar figures when paired with the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti.

720p720p

At 720p, although the GPU bottlenecks are removed and the 5900X rushes past the 5600X to an impressive 124 FPS (average) and 62 FPS (0.1 percentile FPS), the overall CPU usage remains rather poor, with the latter averaging just around 25% and the former staying just under 60%.

The Division 2

1080p1080p

In The Division 2, the Ryzen 7 3700X barely outpaces the 3600X at 720p but falls behind at 1080p when it comes to the averages. The Ryzen 5 5600X is much faster than every other CPU tested, especially at lower resolutions.

720p

Once again, the CPU utilization is more or less the same across the 5600X and 3700X, but the IPC/boost clock advantage puts the former ahead of the latter.

5600X3700X5900X

Benchmarks continue on the next page…

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Related Articles

Ryzen 7 5700x vs 3700x Benchmark [39% Faster than 2080 Ti]

Nvidia RTX 3080 — 39% Faster than the RTX 2080 Ti for only $699

Welcome to the Ryzen 7 5700x vs 3700x benchmark comparison. In this review, we will take a deep look at how these two CPUs compare to one another, as well as how these hardware specs deliver in gaming and productivity performances.

2020 has certainly been one amazing year for technology and gaming hardware releases. Nvidia kicked things off with their 3000 series Ampere graphics cards.

While the lack of stock and unavailability is unfortunate, it allowed AMD to swoop in with their Big Navi Radeon 6000 Graphics cards who are certainly making Team Green very worried.

AMD were also busy making custom hardware for both the Sony PlayStation 5 (Price not available) and Microsoft XBox Series X ($499.00).

AMD didn’t stop there however, dethroning yet another titan in the microprocessor hardware industry, Team Blue – Intel, with their launch of the all new Ryzen Zen3 5000 CPU’s, which now beats the socks off Intel, at the one thing they still held dear – single threaded gaming performance.

With that said, let’s see how the Ryzen 5700X compares to the Ryzen 3700X.

Table of Contents

Ryzen 7 5700x vs 3700x

General Specifications
Speed & Performance

  • Clock Speeds
  • Cores, Threads & Bus

Cache
Memory Specs & Performance

  • Memory Specs
  • Memory Speeds

Lanes & Expansion Ports
Power & Temperatures
Benchmarks

  • PC Setup
  • 1080p Benchmarks
  • Productivity Benchmarks

Conclusion

AMD Ryzen Zen3 vs Ryzen Zen2

AMD Ryzen Zen3 vs Intel

Ryzen 7 5700x vs 3700x — General Specs

Content

  1. General characteristic
  2. Productivity
  3. Testing
  4. Conclusion

General characteristic

9056

  • 900AIE0003

    CPU TDP is 65W. However, due to the fact that the operation of PrecisionBoost 2 technology has been reconfigured in favor of maximum frequencies, and not low consumption, there is no particular economy in the Ryzen 7 3700X. A system based on this processor in computational algorithms can consume 150 or even 200 watts.

    Performance

    Let’s take a closer look at the characteristics of this model.

    Eight cores work in sixteen threads. Their base frequency is 3.6 GHz, and the dynamic frequency is 4.4 GHz. The dual-channel RAM controller guarantees DDR4-3200 mode, although this is not the limit of possibilities.

    Nevertheless, overclocking is still not at all about the Ryzen 7 3700X. We can say that the processor works almost at the limit of its capabilities even in the nominal mode due to the PrecisionBoost 2 technology, which is clearly hinted at by the observed operating temperatures. Despite active cooling, under prolonged loads the chipset warms up to 80-85°C, although you can usually see 45-65°C. The maximum frequency for all cores, which we managed to “squeeze out” during manual overclocking, turned out to be only 4.2 GHz. When the supply voltage was increased to 1.4 V, the processor worked stably at this frequency and passed stress testing, however, the temperature under load increased to 105 degrees, which can hardly be considered a normal operating mode. It makes no sense to resort to such overclocking. The increase in performance under multi-threaded load will be several percent, despite the fact that when the cores are not fully loaded, the processor will work even slower than in the nominal mode.

    Testing

    The assembly for the tests will be as follows: ASRock X570 Taichi motherboard, 2 x 8 GB G.SKILL Flare X DDR4-3600 RAM sticks, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti video card, Samsung 960 PRO 1TB SSD and Seasonic SS power supply -860XP.

    In synthetic tests and applications, the processor performs excellently.

    Let’s see how the processor behaves in games.

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    3DMark Time Spy Extreme CPU 4664
    Ultra, FullHD Ryzen 7 3700X
    Battlefield V 134
    Call of Duty Modern Warfare 171
    AC: Odyssey 101
    Apex Legends 143
    Borderlands 3 124

    as a similar configuration built on eight-core Intel processors. But still, despite noticeable improvements compared to its predecessors, the new generation of Ryzen remains a kind of compromise for gaming assemblies, but the scope of applicability of AMD processors in this role will clearly expand.

    Conclusion

    The results speak for themselves. The Ryzen 7 3700X is not so expensive compared to the cost of top-end video cards, so it is perfect for the role of a universal solution — both to play and work. In any case, you no longer need to be torn between smart and beautiful, choosing either «fast cores» or «many cores inexpensively. » There was an offer «a lot of fast cores inexpensively», which is extremely difficult to resist.

    Ryzen 7 3700X [in 15 benchmarks]

    AMD
    Ryzen 7 3700X

    • Interface
    • Core frequency
    • Video memory size
    • Memory type
    • Memory frequency
    • Maximum resolution

    Description

    AMD launched AMD Ryzen 7 3700X on May 27, 2019 at a suggested price of $329. This is a Matisse (Zen 2) architecture desktop processor primarily aimed at office systems. It has 8 cores and 16 threads and is manufactured using 7nm process technology, the maximum frequency is 4400MHz, the multiplier is unlocked.

    Compatibility is a socket processor
    AMD socket AM4
    with TDP 65W. It supports memory
    DDR4
    dual-channel.

    It provides poor benchmark performance at

    22.53%

    from the leader, which is AMD EPYC 7h22.


    Ryzen 7
    3700X

    or


    EPYC
    7h22

    General information

    Information about the type (desktop or laptop) and architecture of the Ryzen 7 3700X, as well as when sales started and cost at that time.

    • 0
    • 50
    • 100

    Features

    Ryzen 7 3700X quantitative parameters such as number of cores and threads, clock speeds, manufacturing process, cache size and multiplier lock status. They indirectly speak about the performance of the processor, but for an accurate assessment, you need to consider the results of the tests.

    0031 of 1536 (EPYC Embeded 3401)

    9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005

    9005 9005 9005 9005 9005

    9005)

    9003 9,003,19,19,19,19,19,19,1EL0003

    CASH 2nd level 512K (for nucleus) 9288 (Core 2 QUAD Q9550)

    4 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005 9005

    32 MB
    Technological process 7 nm of 5 (Apple M1)

    90,000 90,000

    AES-Ni +
    AVX +
    90,000

    90,000

    920
    Technologies supported by Ryzen 7 3700X that accelerate virtual machines are listed.

    AMD-V +

    Memory support

    Types, maximum size and channels of RAM supported by Ryzen 7 3700X. Higher memory frequency may be supported depending on the motherboard.

    )

    )0003

    RAM types DDR4
    Dual-channel
    of 5200 (Ryzen 5 7600x)
    Permissible memory volume 128 GB of 786 (Xeon E5-2670 V3)
    GPU

    Benchmark tests

    These are the results of the Ryzen 7 3700X performance tests in non-gaming benchmarks. The overall score is set from 0 to 100, where 100 corresponds to the fastest processor at the moment.


    Overall performance in tests

    This is our overall performance rating. We regularly improve our algorithms, but if you find any inconsistencies, feel free to speak up in the comments section, we usually fix problems quickly.

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    22.53

    • Passmark
    • GeekBench 5 Single-Core
    • GeekBench 5 Multi-Core
    • Cinebench 10 32-bit single-core
    • Cinebench 10 32-bit multi-core
    • 3DMark06 CPU
    • Cinebench 11.5 64-bit multi-core
    • Cinebench 15 64-bit multi-core
    • Cinebench 15 64-bit single-core
    • Cinebench 11.5 64-bit single-core
    • TrueCrypt AES
    • WinRAR 4.0
    • x264 encoding pass 2
    • x264 encoding pass 1
    Passmark

    Passmark CPU Mark is a widely used benchmark that consists of 8 different tests, including integer and floating point calculations, extended instruction tests, compression, encryption, and game physics calculations. Also includes a separate single-threaded test.

    Benchmark coverage: 68%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    22711

    GeekBench 5 Single-Core

    GeekBench 5 Single-Core is a cross-platform application designed as CPU benchmarks that independently recreate certain real world tasks that can accurately measure performance. This version uses only one processor core.

    Benchmark coverage: 37%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    1251

    GeekBench 5 Multi-Core

    GeekBench 5 Multi-Core is a cross-platform application designed as CPU benchmarks that independently recreate certain real world tasks that can accurately measure performance. This version uses all available processor cores.

    Benchmark coverage: 37%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    8395

    Cinebench 10 32-bit single-core

    Cinebench R10 is a very outdated ray tracing benchmark for processors developed by the authors of Cinema 4D, Maxon. The Single-Core version uses a single CPU thread to render a futuristic motorcycle model.

    Benchmark coverage: 20%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    5839

    Cinebench 10 32-bit multi-core

    Cinebench Release 10 Multi Core is a variant of Cinebench R10 that uses all processor threads. The possible number of threads in this version is limited to 16.

    Benchmark coverage: 19%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    40439

    3DMark06 CPU

    3DMark06 is an outdated set of benchmarks based on DirectX 9 by Futuremark. Its processor part contains two tests, one of which calculates the pathfinding of game AI, the other emulates game physics using the PhysX package.

    Benchmark coverage: 19%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    13815

    Cinebench 11.5 64-bit multi-core

    Cinebench Release 11.5 Multi Core is a variant of Cinebench R11.5 that uses all processor threads. This version supports a maximum of 64 threads.

    Benchmark coverage: 17%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    23

    Cinebench 15 64-bit multi-core

    Cinebench Release 15 Multi Core (sometimes referred to as Multi-Thread) is a variant of Cinebench R15 that uses all of the processor threads.

    Benchmark coverage: 14%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    2092

    Cinebench 15 64-bit single-core

    Cinebench R15 (Release 15) is a benchmark created by Maxon, the creator of the popular Cinema 4D 3D modeling package. It was superseded by later versions of Cinebench using more modern variants of the Cinema 4D engine. The Single Core version (sometimes referred to as Single-Thread) uses only one CPU thread to render a room full of mirror balls and complexly shaped lights.

    Benchmark coverage: 14%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    204

    Cinebench 11.5 64-bit single-core

    Cinebench R11.5 is an old Maxon development benchmark. authors of Cinema 4D. It has been superseded by later versions of Cinebench which use more modern variants of the Cinema 4D engine. The Single Core version loads one CPU thread with ray tracing, rendering a glossy room full of crystal spheres and lights.

    Benchmark coverage: 14%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    2.3

    TrueCrypt AES

    TrueCrypt is a deprecated program that was widely used to encrypt disk partitions on the fly. It contains several built-in benchmarks, one of which is TrueCrypt AES. It measures the speed of data encryption using the AES algorithm. The result of the test is the encryption speed in gigabytes per second.

    Benchmark coverage: 13%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    11

    WinRAR 4.0

    WinRAR 4.0 is an outdated version of the popular archiver. It contains an internal speed test using maximum compression by the RAR algorithm on large amounts of randomly generated data. Results are measured in kilobytes per second.

    Benchmark coverage: 12%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    7503

    x264 encoding pass 2

    x264 Pass 2 is a slower MPEG4 x264 video compression benchmark, resulting in a variable bit rate output file. This results in a better quality of the resulting video file, as a higher bit rate is used when it is needed more. The benchmark result is still measured in frames per second.

    Benchmark coverage: 12%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    115

    x264 encoding pass 1

    The x264 benchmark uses the MPEG 4 x264 compression method to encode the sample video in HD (720p). Pass 1 is a faster option that produces an output file at a constant bit rate. Its result is measured in frames per second, that is, how many frames of the source video file were encoded in one second on average.

    Benchmark coverage: 12%

    Ryzen 7 3700X
    270


    Relative capacity

    Overall performance of the Ryzen 7 3700X compared to its closest competitor in desktop processors.


    Intel Core i9-11900
    101.24

    Intel Core i9-10850K
    100.84

    AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X
    100.27

    AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
    100

    Intel Core i9-11900KB
    99.91

    Intel Core i9-10900X
    99.73

    AMD Ryzen 7 5700GE
    98.98

    Competitor from Intel

    We believe that the closest competitor of Ryzen 7 3700X from Intel is Core i9-11900KB, which is approximately equal in speed and 1 position lower in our rating.


    Core i9
    11900KB

    Compare

    Here are some of Intel’s closest competitors to the Ryzen 7 3700X:

    Intel Core i9-11900F
    101.24

    Intel Core i9-11900
    101.24

    Intel Core i9-10850K
    100.84

    AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
    100

    Intel Core i9-11900KB
    99.91

    Intel Core i9-10900X
    99.73

    Intel Core i9-9900X
    96.32

    Other processors

    Here we recommend several processors that are more or less similar in performance to the one considered.


    Core i9
    11900KB

    Compare


    Core i9
    10900X

    Compare


    Ryzen Threadripper
    1920X

    Compare


    Core i9
    10850K

    Compare


    Core i9
    11900

    Compare


    Core i9
    11900F

    Compare

    Recommended Graphics Cards

    These graphics cards are most commonly used with Ryzen 7 3700X according to our statistics:


    GeForce RTX
    2070 Super

    6. 3%


    GeForce RTX
    3060

    5.6%


    GeForce RTX
    3070

    5.4%


    GeForce RTX
    2060

    5.4%


    GeForce GTX
    1660 Super

    5.2%


    GeForce RTX
    3060 Ti

    4.6%


    GeForce GTX
    1050 Ti

    3.9%


    GeForce RTX
    2060 Super

    3.7%


    Radeon RX
    5700XT

    3.6%


    GeForce GTX
    1650

    3.2%

    User rating

    Here you can see the evaluation of the processor by users, as well as put your own rating.


    Tips and comments

    Here you can ask a question about the Ryzen 7 3700X processor, agree or disagree with our judgements, or report errors or inaccuracies on the site. 9The 00X, 3700X is a versatile QB that can make a quick short pass, pop into the field for modest gain, or even launch a long ball when needed. requires.

    When it comes to playing football — running PC games — there isn’t much difference between the 3700X and the 3900X. Actually there is no difference. When it comes to gaming, the 3700X and 3900X are effectively linked and you can safely ignore the slightly faster 3800X. That’s 1-4 percent better (according to tests at Tom’s Hardware) for an extra $70. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

    Here’s what AMD Ryzen 2nd and 3rd generation specs look like:

    The 3800X’s maximum overclock is only 100MHz faster than the 3700X, but the minimum «guaranteed» frequencies are potentially 300MHz higher. In practice, however, the 3700X generally runs well above its minimum clock speed, especially under light to medium workloads. If you do a lot of 3D rendering or video encoding, upgrading to the Ryzen 9 3900X makes sense, but for everyone else, the 3700X is a great choice. Alternatively, previous generation AMD components are now up for replacement — the Ryzen 7 2700X typically sells for $220 or less.

    I have detailed architectural updates elsewhere (Ryzen 3000 and Zen 2 architectural updates), so I’m not going to rephrase it here. Basically, Zen 2 is better, smaller, and faster than Zen+ and the original Zen architectures. How much faster? It depends on what you are doing, so let’s move on to the tests.

    All subsequent tests were performed using the latest Windows 10 May 2019 update with updated drivers and BIOS firmware. Unlike some other sites (and I’m not judging their test protocols. I just don’t), all processors are tested with high speed DDR4-3200 CL14 memory with XMP memory profiles enabled. This is the sort of overclocking that potentially helps AMD CPUs more than Intel chips, but it’s the easiest and simplest form of overclocking, and all modern CPUs can easily handle higher memory speeds. In other words, each computer is in the greatest possible equality.

    As with other Ryzen processors, I haven’t done extensive overclocking tests on the Ryzen 7 3700X. This is because it usually doesn’t help much. You’re sacrificing overclocking clock speed for higher all-core clock speeds, although with the 3700X there’s at least a little more to gain from enabling Precision Boost Overdrive. At best, it’s only 200 MHz, which means less than 5 percent improvement, and often in the 1-3 percent range. The days of huge successes due to overclocking of the processor are already behind. Intel Core i9The -9900K might get an extra 400MHz over stock, and AMD processors might get an extra 200-300MHz, which isn’t all that exciting. This is the blessing and the curse of increased competition.

    All 3G AMD components were tested on the MSI MEG X570 Godlike board (with similar results for Asus and Gigabyte boards). Memory aside, I used a Gigabyte Aorus NVMe Gen4 2TB SSD as the primary drive (another part of the AMD review kit) with a GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition graphics card.

    Ryzen 7 3700X gaming performance

    Let’s start with gaming performance. Here’s what the Ryzen 7 3700X looks like. All ten games are tested at 1080p «ultra» (generally at the highest possible settings, except for supersampled anti-aliasing), and each test is run multiple times to ensure consistent results. Minimum fps is calculated as the average fps for the bottom three percent of frame time — find the 97th percentile of frame time and sum all frame times above that divided by the number of frames. This gives a more useful metric than net minimum fps or net 97 percentile.

    Of the ten games tested, the 3700X and 3900X are pretty much tied, with the 3900X holding up by a slight 0.5% lead in frame rates. That’s within the margin of error, and that’s with an RTX 2080 Ti at 1080p; go to 1440p or 4K or upgrade to a slower GPU and the gap is almost completely gone.

    What about Intel and its Core i7-9700K and Core i9-9900K? The 9700K actually tops the overall gaming performance chart — yes, Hyper-Threading isn’t always useful for gaming. So 9The 700K is 10 percent faster than the 3700X and the 9900K is 9 percent faster. Of course, this is when running games at 1080p with the fastest GPU available. The tearing will be significantly smaller at 1440p and virtually non-existent at 4K.

    In other words, like the 3900X, AMD can’t claim the gaming performance crown and is actually outperformed by even the older i7-7700K, depending on the game. If gaming is your number one priority, you’ll still be better off with an Intel processor (not to mention the various security vulnerabilities that have been fixed over the past 18 months).

    Application performance Ryzen 7 3700X

    Hit the shower and leave the playing field behind, and the differences between the 9700K and 3700X are reversed. With the extra streams available via SMT, the 3700X is about 18 percent faster than the 9700K in multi-threaded workloads. Turn all benchmarks on and AMD is generally ahead of you by about 7 percent — and at a lower price since you’ll still need an aftermarket cooler with the 9700K.

    As I mentioned in review 3900X, it’s important to remember what these CPU tests actually mean. 3D rendering and y-cruncher are great tools to use all possible CPU resources. These are also tools that the vast majority of people will never use (3D rendering in particular). Video encoding at least has something to do with streaming performance, though I still think amateur streamers are better off using GPU encoding and professional streamers should have a dedicated streaming PC.

    Zen 2 architectural upgrades are definitely impacting CPU performance, and TSMC’s 7nm process gives AMD a manufacturing lead over Intel for the first time in…ever. Look no further than power consumption, where the 3700X maxed out at 179W for multi-threaded workloads, compared to the 9900K’s 242W or 9700K’s 208W. Currently shipping is a 10nm Intel node that could end up being similar or maybe even better than TSMC’s 7nm node, but it’s only used in laptop parts and that doesn’t seem to be changing anytime soon. Instead, there are rumors that the upcoming 10th generation 14nm Intel Comet Lake processors will bolster Intel’s desktop playoff hopes. Which seems incredibly strange, but never mind.

    Ryzen 7 3700X — an impressive processor

    AMD Ryzen processors continue to put pressure on Intel, forcing more powerful processors to become popular. With the release of the third generation Ryzen, AMD has become the death knell for HEDT platforms. I still like the idea of ​​extreme performance, and 56-core and 64-core server chips are cool, but I definitely don’t need them on my home PC. Honestly, with chips like the Ryzen 9 3900X, I don’t need HEDT processors from Intel or AMD. If you can get a great 8-core chip for 329dollars and a 12-core chip for $499, why bother with a more expensive motherboard, memory, processor, and power supply?

    The Ryzen 7 3700X is a great overall processor and probably the smart choice for most users. Why spend tons of money on a CPU and then cut back on the graphics card, storage, motherboard, and/or memory? It’s always better if you go one or two steps below the top parts. Pure performance is good, but a balanced approach is often better. There’s nothing wrong with stepping back a bit and getting a slightly less powerful piece for a much more reasonable price.

    The Ryzen 7 3700X actually has only two potential problems. First, if you are planning to buy a top-tier GPU like RTX 2080 Ti or RTX 2080 Super, and if you shoot for 144fps, Intel processors will still win in games. It depends on the game, but at 1080p ultra I’ve measured a 30% difference in frame rates, and even at 1440p high resolution, faster processors can still be favored.

    Secondly, overclocking of the latest AMD and Intel processors becomes strictly limited. On Intel you can at least play with individual core multipliers, so maybe 5.0 GHz for all cores and 5.2 GHz for 1/2 core loads. If you’re manually overclocking an AMD chip, that’s one multiplier, period. So you may lose single-threaded performance due to a small increase in multi-threaded performance. PBO (Precision Boost Overdrive) allows the CPU to exceed the default clock speed depending on thermals, although you will generally want liquid cooling, you will get a maximum of 200 MHz when you do this.

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